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Not wanting to go to an HBCU

OhboiOhboi Posts: 1,119Registered User Senior Member
OK, so is it wrong of me not to want to go to an HBCU? My mother acts like it is. I have nothing against the, but my main reason for not wanted to go to one is because of the lack of diversity. I understand the whole thing about being around successful people of your own race, but I want to go beyond that.

Are there any other AA's on here that feel the same way?
Post edited by Ohboi on
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Replies to: Not wanting to go to an HBCU

  • sparknerd2010sparknerd2010 Posts: 97Registered User Junior Member
    I completely understand the desire for diversity. When I was younger I attended a predominately white church and a mostly AA elementary school, so I never experienced diversity until middle school. I love it and I don't want to go back. I have a friend on the other hand who is only applying to HBCU's b/c she has attended predominately white schools her entire life.
  • EntertainerEntertainer Posts: 767Registered User Member
    Now that I am in college I realize the term diversity" means nothing at all. It is just a term to attract students to colleges. To me diversity is supposed to mean, that people of different, races, cultures, and backgrounds are interacting/communicating with one another, but when you look at the overall picture, black people hang out with black people, white with white, Asian with Asian, and Hispanic with Hispanic. Although there are some that integrate, most don't. People are going to make friends with people that are similar to them. Although some people take risks and befriend others of different races, most don't (according to what I have observed).

    Personally I don't like the idea of HBCU's, I would rather have a college with a diverse population than a college that doesn't. However, you must know yourself. If you only have specific kinds of friends, going to a college with a lot of diversity won't mean much, unless you take the initiative to meet other people of different races, backgrounds, cultures, etc.
  • Mare_CrisiumMare_Crisium Posts: 381Registered User Member
    I can understand how you feel. I have NO HBCUs on my list, and my father is heart-broken (he had hoped I would attend Howard) but I've gone to a predominately white school, with a substantial number of international asian students and I enjoy the atmosphere. I like having a mix of friends and being able to interact and learn about other peoples cultures. Similar to what Entertainer said, it all depends on how you're going to act when you go to a college. Major, Dorm mates, clubs, all those things affect how diverse your actually experience will be in the end.
  • OhboiOhboi Posts: 1,119Registered User Senior Member
    I am the type of person that interacts with all different kinds of people. I do agree that diversity doesn't mean anything when ppl only hang out with their racial group anyway. I'm longing to go to NYU, where hopefully people are much more open-minded.
  • JunieJunie Posts: 392Registered User Junior Member
    i didnt either. im happy nobody is forcing me to. but honestly, i like to get along with all types of people. its more fun.
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11,520Registered User Senior Member
    Next weekend I am doing "family day" with my daughter at Duke, then taking her to homecoming at my alma mater, Howard University. It's ALL good.

    Mare_Crisium; tell your dad to PM me....
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11,520Registered User Senior Member
    "diversity" means nothing at all. It is just a term to attract students to colleges. To me diversity is supposed to mean, that people of different, races, cultures, and backgrounds are interacting/communicating with one another, but when you look at the overall picture , black people hang out with black people, white with white, Asian with Asian, and Hispanic with Hispanic. Although there are some that integrate, most don't. People are going to make friends with people that are similar to them. Although some people take risks and befriend others of different races, most don't"....

    I think you are wrong, although I will acknowledge this is as a parent paying "full pay" at a private ( think just a minute please, about how we got here...). My daughter would probably agree. I think I will give my daughter, and you, the benefit of the doubt, but I will add that to me, it doesn't mean "nothing", until you have achieved a threshold of maybe 8 percent.

    And to me, with kids applying from California ( and I've lived in DC, LA, and NY), I'm thinking anything above 4 percent is unusual, and a big deal....
  • SilvermoonlockSilvermoonlock Posts: 469Registered User Junior Member
    I usually do the defend the HBCU thing. I am tired of it now. You have to do what you feel is best for you. HBCUs are not for everyone and PWIs are not for everyone. If you research HBCUs, you willl see HBCU does not equal all Black.

    My daughter attended a 99.9% white high school, being the only Black in her graduating class and was tired of being the minority. She is in her 2nd year at Howard in the Honors Program and is loving every minute of it.

    Howard is diverse, but it is far from being 100% Black. When we picked her up at the end of freshman year, several graduations were going on, including the Medical School, Nursing School and School of Dentistry. There was a huge mix of people, clearly not all Black. Her friends are from all over the country and all over the world. She has research opportunities, planning on going to Ecuador this summer (so far away).

    I am not advocating anyone to go or even consider Howard, but I do ask that you become knowledgeable about it before making a sweeping generalization about it.

    Actually, that advice is good for any school you want to attend. Make sure the reality measures up to your expectations.

    Hey Shrinkrap, say Hello to my kid! :)
  • OhboiOhboi Posts: 1,119Registered User Senior Member
    I know they're not ALL black. It wouldn't be legal for them to only admit black students.

    "HBCUs are not for everyone and PWIs are not for everyone. If you research HBCUs, you willl see HBCU does not equal all Black."
    I absolutely agree with this statement. This is why I don't appreciate my mother trying to make me feel in the wrong for not wanting to go to one. It's just not for me, and she doesn't get that.
  • siattamsiattam Posts: 11Registered User New Member
    nope, i'm black and although there are alot of nice HBCU's i lovveeeeeeeeee diversity. i know HBCU's aren't all black, but um yea not for me
  • HarambeeHarambee Posts: 2,604Registered User Senior Member
  • bandgeek05bandgeek05 Posts: 253Registered User Junior Member
    Until I began seriously researching schools, I had never heard of PWIs. As I develop my short list of colleges and universities, I'm finding that what scares me about HBCUs is that with the exception of schools like Morehouse or Spellman, Historically Black status is the only thing that defines them. The greatest thing I have to offer isn't cocoa skin and I don't want employers to have the chance to think PWI or HBCU when my resume is on their desk.
  • anowlinanowlin Posts: 3Registered User New Member
    I have gone to a predominantly white school since I was 4.
    I am black. I am mixed. I am hispanic.
    My grandmother really wanted me to consider an HBCU, but to me, it's simply not for me. I feel that in a society where I am a minority, I should know how to deal with being a minority. Granted, some choose to stay in the "comfort zone" of homogeneous race, but, having been the minority all my life, I know that I have grown stronger because of it, and excelled in that way. While I don't think it is bad to have hbcu's or wrong to go to them at all, it intrigues me how you don't see that many whites thinking about going to them. But, I also think that if the ultimate goal is integration, this makes that harder. Not that they aren't a place to cohesively grow with people who are similar to you, and yes that is okay, and often necessary, but how about figuring out a way to do so within the context of being a minority.
  • Mouse121992Mouse121992 Posts: 208Registered User Junior Member
    I totally agree with Anowlin. My education from the "gifted" program in my school district has very few blacks, with a decrease every year. But, I'm learning that I have to work harder than them to have a secure job in the real world. Also, I know that my peers respect me and I have definitely become a stronger person as a result. HBCU's are nice for certain people, but the real world is not a reflection of that. Might as well get used to it.
  • corysmithcorysmith Posts: 142Registered User Junior Member
    I went to a predominantly white school all my life, including CC now. I've never based my school choice only on race. Though I have to admit, usually I was the only black student in my AP classes in high school and while it wasn't super uncomfortable I rather would have at least half the class be black or at least spanish or something. Especially when sometimes when some of my 'friends'/associates kind of pushed their limits as to what was okay to say as a joke or not. I had to mean mug some folks who crossed the line, but it wasn't often.

    I have thought about going to an HBCU but they all seem too closed off for me for different reasons, mostly distance/financial reasons. When I was a HS sophmore though, I did want to go to Howard, but like I said, distance/financial and medical reasons erased that option.
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