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Anyone Know The Grading Curve For AP Chem?

ihopeipass08ihopeipass08 Posts: 88Registered User Junior Member
edited May 2007 in AP Tests Preparation
Can someone tell me what the grading curve on the AP Chem exam has been for tests as recently as possible?
Post edited by ihopeipass08 on
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Replies to: Anyone Know The Grading Curve For AP Chem?

  • lobgentlobgent Posts: 548Registered User Member
    In the past, ~60% was a 5. The AP format has changed, though, so the curve may change, depending on how the removal of alternative questions this year affects student performance.
  • august's_chopinaugust's_chopin Posts: 312Registered User Member
    should be easier this time since it's a new format
  • SunPenguinSunPenguin Posts: 261Registered User Junior Member
    Princeton Review actually claimed that the curve is at 50%. 60% seemed a bit high?
  • avantgardenavantgarden Posts: 212Registered User Junior Member
    My teacher says that about 75% right on the whole exam will get you a five, safely. About 50-55% correct is a four, according to him. Unless I'm forgetting and he was talking about a three, which hopefully can't be the case.

    Princeton Review (which is a little outdated since this year's changes to the exam), claims that you can skip every third M.C. and get a five. It insists that the curve is really generous.
  • SunPenguinSunPenguin Posts: 261Registered User Junior Member
    well, 75% correct - penalty i suppose.
  • gmac525gmac525 Posts: 139Registered User Junior Member
    if you get 100 percent you can get a 5
  • Ashraf EassaAshraf Eassa Posts: 1,432Registered User Senior Member
    ^^ I don't know. I think they're adding an extra-credit section so that one needs a 105%+ to get a '5'.
  • gfaithgfaith Posts: 175Registered User Junior Member
    Typical cutoffs
    5 - 65%
    4 - 50-55%
    3 - 35%
    It varies a little from year to year, but the percentage of students who score 5's is a fairly consistent 15-17%.

    Note, however, that if you are trying to self-score old practice tests, not only do you have to deduct 1/4 point for wrong MC answers, but you also should realize that each FR question is individually weighted. For example, in the 2002 test (the last released exam with a full scoring rubric), FR#1 had 10 points maximum with a multiplier of 1.76 for a total of 17.6 points possible. Compare that to FR#4 which had 15 points maximum with a multiplier of 0.88 for a total of 13.2 points maximum. Even though question 1 had fewer points, it was worth more in the final score. Unless you know the multipliers, its hard to get an accurate idea of your percentage.
  • SunPenguinSunPenguin Posts: 261Registered User Junior Member
    65%? man that's a tough curve...
  • gfaithgfaith Posts: 175Registered User Junior Member
    Just had a chance to look up the actual scores for the 2002 exam - after the weighting factors are applied
    5 - 66.9%
    4 - 53.1%
    3 - 38.1%
    In 2002, 14.8% of students received a 5.
  • kimu08kimu08 Posts: 227Registered User Junior Member
    I'm a little in the dark because of my teacher, but do you think this year's exam will be a little easier because of the new format? This IS the "guinea pig" year, if you will, so do you think this new exam will be easier the first year?
  • crosscurrentcrosscurrent Posts: 547Registered User Member
    107/160 for a 5
  • omarr2321omarr2321 Posts: 348Registered User Member
    is that for sure? my chem teacher said its 50-55% or higher, and he said that the new part of the chem test will take place of the older version of reaction predictions
  • gfaithgfaith Posts: 175Registered User Junior Member
    Yes, that's for sure. 107/160 is the actual cut score from 2002. As for "the new part of the chem test will take the place of the older version of reaction predictions" ... the new part is still reaction predictions. The difference is (a) you aren't given any choice of reactions (b) you have to balance them and (c) you have to answer a quesiton about the reaction.
  • omarr2321omarr2321 Posts: 348Registered User Member
    i took the 1999 ap test today, the first 34 multiple choice questions i got 16 right!

    i should open up my barrons ap chem book
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