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Will Admission Officials Google Me?

Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone CC Admissions Expert Posts: 3,591 Senior Member
Question: If you Google my name you will see a Wikipedia article about my life, and the company I started is mentioned in many news reports. Do admission officials search the Internet to know about the student?

WHAT DID "THE DEAN" SAY?

See: http://www.collegeconfidential.com/dean/will-admission-officials-google-me/

Replies to: Will Admission Officials Google Me?

  • TopoloverTopolover Registered User Posts: 142 Junior Member
    Who cares if they do? So long as you're not on America's Most Wanted....
  • dizzlebraindizzlebrain Registered User Posts: 44 Junior Member
    I find it shocking that it's still rumored that they'll look you up. Admissions reps I've had could barely answer emails on time.
  • dizzlebraindizzlebrain Registered User Posts: 44 Junior Member
    I seriously doubt they'll take the time. But like the person above said if you keep your stuff private and you aren't on America's most wanted.
  • EmpireappleEmpireapple Registered User Posts: 441 Member
    I have wondered about this but because there is someone else around a similar age with my son's exact name. So far he has not done anything awful but at a simple search, one might think his open Instagram and activity is my son when it is not. I hope admissions and perspective employers take the time to realize duplicate names, even of ones that aren't especially common exist.
  • TopoloverTopolover Registered User Posts: 142 Junior Member
    As I found out this semester, there are instructors that have, literally, nothing better to do than poke around about their students. No it's not right, but you're not going to stop it. So long as they are not sharing personal or educational stuff about you, FERPA is not violated. Nothing about health related stuff and generally speaking HIPAA and ADA are not violated. Though ADA can pop it's head up on occassion.

    But as I said, "who cares?" It just shows you what the moral integrity of the person is when they snoop.
  • Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone CC Admissions Expert Posts: 3,591 Senior Member
    edited September 2016
    I hope admissions and perspective employers take the time to realize duplicate names, even of ones that aren't especially common exist.

    I've been amazed by how many seemingly unusual names are shared, sometimes even by multiple people of roughly the same age and from roughly the same place. I do think that most college folks are careful about this, and--given that such a small number of them will resort to Google in the first place--it's probably not a major concern, but--even so--it might be of SOME concern.

    While I think that it's unnecessary for the typical student to tell admission officers, "I'm not Freddie P. Huffnagle from Springfield High, I'm Freddie P. Huffnagle from Bloomfield High," there are probably isolated cases where a namesake has racked up some public misdeeds. So, in these rare instances, it might be worthwhile to alert admission officers to potential mistaken identity.
    Post edited by Sally_Rubenstone on
  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 Registered User Posts: 4,064 Senior Member
    It just shows you what the moral integrity of the person is when they snoop

    Looking at publicly available websites is not snooping. Colleges may not google you- but a fair few employers will. Those that do are not beginners- they know that many names are common (how do you think the late Senator Edward Kennedy ended up on a TSA watch list?!).

    I know people whose job is to trawl social media sites and news sites to research prospective hires. I also know somebody whose provisional job offer from a top-level company was rescinded when they saw what was publicly available on his social media platforms. They told him that if he couldn't keep his private life more private than that they didn't feel confident trusting him with their clients private information.

    Use privacy settings. Googling somebody is not snooping, and if you think that what you put out into the world is private, you need to think again.

  • cameo43cameo43 Registered User Posts: 1,267 Senior Member
    At one of my kid's college interviews this past summer, the interviewer mentioned one of her musical performances, which is on YouTube. We were both very surprised... so, yes, I'd have to say that this can and does happen.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 23,774 Senior Member
    edited September 2016
    Sally, I think your Ask the Dean response is spot on.

    Kids should worry less about being googled and more about what worries them about being googled. And an adcom isn't going to just google "Freddie P Huffnagle" and page through all the accountants in Australia, FB entries and etc. The'd likely enter "Freddie P Huffnagle" and "Bloomfield High" and the name of the activity or organization or whatever. Hone in.

    I once googled a kid's high school for the right reasons and the hs didn't even have the activity he mentioned working on for 3 years or winning state attention for. Nor did any in his community. Oops.
  • TopoloverTopolover Registered User Posts: 142 Junior Member
    While you are correct, it gives the kids something to think about when they post stupid crap online, there are the cases where the ability to snoop, though not illegal, could still be wrong. I know that from my work as a political activist this has caused me some grief. You would think if it's not illegal, who'd care? But if you so much as disagree with the personal beliefs of someone else, this can cause you a great deal of difficulty (as I have found out, personally). That's immoral and unethical, but not illegal, thus "who cares".
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