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online recruiting questionaires

wishivywishivy Posts: 14Registered User New Member
edited January 2013 in Athletic Recruits
Do coaches usually respond to those?

Is it a good first step towards contacting college coaches or should you email them personally?
Post edited by wishivy on
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Replies to: online recruiting questionaires

  • SteveMASteveMA Posts: 6,079Registered User Senior Member
    Yes and no. We have had the most luck just emailing the coaches directly.
  • wishivywishivy Posts: 14Registered User New Member
    But if they write back is it because they are at least somehow interested?
    What if they tell you they look forward to hearing from you soon and that they'll answer you any question, what should you tell more than you have in the actual questionnaire and how should you address the actual problem (if they want you on their team)?
  • hangNtherehangNthere Posts: 71Registered User Junior Member
    Whenever my children initiated contact, they started with online recruiting forms. In most cases, we received prompt responses from college coaches. How quickly a coach gets back to you may have more to do with the coach than the athletes qualifications. A couple of the weaker teams took months to follow up and some the the best programs in the country contacted them in as little as a few hours.

    I view these forms as a means to introduce yourself and nothing more. Once a dialogue is started, I would answer a coach's questions as promptly and directly as possible.
  • wishivywishivy Posts: 14Registered User New Member
    i see, thanks
  • stalkermamastalkermama Posts: 585Registered User Member
    Every school and coach is different. Some coaches take a day to respond some take 3 weeks. Its the craziest thing.You don't know if you are being rejected,stalled or the coach is a bad communicator. Just when you think its all over they say they love you. Then you don't hear from them. What's up with this.There should be a better system.
  • efirestone14efirestone14 Posts: 110Registered User Junior Member
    After filling out an online recruiting questionnaire, email the coach to let them know that you are interested and that you filled out an online questionnaire. Being proactive is key to getting attention from college coaches.
  • stalkermamastalkermama Posts: 585Registered User Member
    I think the online forms were a waste to tell you the truth. Direct email with complete stats were fine.
  • lilmomlilmom Posts: 2,978Registered User Senior Member
    D did both online questionnaires and email. Emailing directly was far more successful.
  • GolfFatherGolfFather Posts: 1,519Registered User Senior Member
    stalkermama and lilmom's posts are very interesting and surprising to me. I would have thought the online form creates more of a permanent record / database and initiates a more formal workflow and a trackable process for eventual contact with the freshman/novice coach. As opposed to e-mails which can so easily just get lost and buried in one’s mailbox.

    The online form (at least for rowers) asks a million questions. I’m sure my D would rather not have to fill one out if we can avoid it.

    Ya know, I wonder what the online forms look like for other sports. Should take a look just out of curiosity.
  • varskavarska Posts: 1,193Registered User Senior Member
    I think a lot of coaches delegate the handling of the recruiting forms - and it's done with varying degrees of competency. Direct email to the coach proved much more effective in our case.
  • imafanimafan Posts: 252Registered User Junior Member
    D did submitted online forms to a wide range of schools starting Junior year. It amazed us that most of those schools did reach out to her after July 1 -- some she had even forgotten she had filled out. However, she also did berecruited, personal emails, and more. You cannot rely on only one method of contact.
  • hangNtherehangNthere Posts: 71Registered User Junior Member
    Recruiting forms are more useful for swimming, track and other sports where past performance can be quantified. Since many online recruiting forms ask the same questions, it only took my youngest daughter about an hour to cut and paste answers into a dozen forms. She also sent follow up emails with additional information and kept coaches updated throughout the year. Every school responded eventually and I believe ten offered Junior Days, Official Visits or both.
  • SchokoladeSchokolade Posts: 1,111Registered User Senior Member
    GolfFather wrote--
    The online form (at least for rowers) asks a million questions. I’m sure my D would rather not have to fill one out if we can avoid it.

    I don't doubt that that is true! However, my son and I found for tennis that the tennis questionnaires tended to ask the same questions, so he saved his answers and was able to cut and paste them. I would be careful not to encourage my child to think that legitimate questions asked by a coach were somehow not worth his or her time to answer.

    My son completed the questionnaire for each college in which he was interested, then emailed each coach to say that he had done so.
  • imafanimafan Posts: 252Registered User Junior Member
    The online form (at least for rowers) asks a million questions. I’m sure my D would rather not have to fill one out if we can avoid it.

    This response puzzles me. Every D1 school in every sport has an online questionnaire. Seriously? Kids would avoid this because it's a pain in the a**?? Coaches are doing these for kicks?

    There's not a D1 coach in the country that's interested in anyone who is looking for shortcuts or not willing to make a 3 minute time investment.

    It's not that hard. Seriously.
  • snowbeltmomsnowbeltmom Posts: 104Registered User Junior Member
    My son is a sophomore, and his sport is tennis. He has his top college choices listed on tennis recruiting along with the SAT II's and AP score results that he took last year.

    He can see which coaches are following his tournament results. Should he also be contacting these coaches directly to show even more interest? If the answer is yes, when should he start? He is our oldest, and the high school tennis coach has never had a player play in college, so he is not going to be any help at all in this process.
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