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What is a "good" GPA in college?

sabrinaygsabrinayg Posts: 15Registered User New Member
edited May 2013 in Business Major
On a 4.0 scale, is 3.5 is considered as a remarkable GPA?
Thanks.
Post edited by sabrinayg on
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Replies to: What is a "good" GPA in college?

  • norris212norris212 Posts: 456Registered User Member
    Usually above a 3.0 is considered "good". Depending on the school, the average gpa is usually in the 2.7-3.0 range. 3.5 is considered very good and I'm guessing that would probably be in the top 15% or so.
  • sabrinaygsabrinayg Posts: 15Registered User New Member
    Thank you, norris212. By the way, does the companies look at the major GPAs more than overall GPAs?
  • workingATbig4workingATbig4 Posts: 317Registered User Member
    This question can't really be answer until you provide your major. No offense but, no, a 3.5 GPA isn't remarkable.
  • derekallen2009derekallen2009 Posts: 437Registered User Member
    My own personal standard...3.4 is Minimum. 3.65+ is Good. 3.75+ is Strong. 3.85+ is I'm the Man.
  • taxguytaxguy Posts: 6,561Registered User Senior Member
    What is good depends on your goals. For example, if you goal is an ivy league grad or professional school, anything under 3.7+ is not good. If your goal is Med school, a 3.6 should be minimum.
    If your goal is to get a job out of college, a 3.25 used to be terrific 25 years ago. However, with grade inflation, this same GPA doesn't usually does NOT put you in the top 25%. Thus, a very good gpa is one that puts you in the top 25%,which is usually at least a 3.5 and could be as much as a 3.6 in some schools. I would generally agree with derekallen2009's analysis if getting a job out of school is your main goal.

    .
  • sabrinaygsabrinayg Posts: 15Registered User New Member
    workingATbig4: No, not offensive at all. That's not my GPA. I heard people saying "3.5 GPA is good enough", but it seems like in my school a lot of people are above it. So I don't know.. I am new.

    derekallen2009, taxguy: Thank you for your explanation. :)
  • sp1212sp1212 Posts: 795Registered User Member
    I will admit I had a lower GPA then a lot of my friends... although I was way past them in terms of credit hours.
  • WhatdidyouWhatdidyou Posts: 539Registered User Member
    in no way is a business major getting a 3.5 gpa remarkable. personally, anything below that, and I wouldnt be suprised if you couldnt get a job...

    sp1212, so? credit hours dont mean anything, gpa stands for grade point AVERAGE. if your friends had taken more credits, they would probably still have higher gpa's.

    norris212, no recruiter would compliment you on your gpa if it was a 3.0. because the average gpa of the students they are interviewing is MUCH higher, mostly.
  • sp1212sp1212 Posts: 795Registered User Member
    LOL wow who the hell is this jerk coming out of nowhere...


    No, It meant I took more hours per semester and harder classes early on.. and just so you know a harder courseload can take a negative effect on GPA.
  • sp1212sp1212 Posts: 795Registered User Member
    AND HONESTLY, learn the concept of an AVERAGE before you try to explain it to someone else, you sound goddamn stupid. Another misinformed kid revealed...
  • MSFHQsiteMSFHQsite Posts: 315Registered User Member
  • norris212norris212 Posts: 456Registered User Member
    Whatdidyou, I never said a recruiter would compliment you if you had a 3.0. All I said is above a 3.0 is considered a "good" gpa because it's better than average. And yes, the average gpa of students getting interviewed is going to be higher than a 3.0, but only because lower gpa applicants were already filtered out; it's not like they're selecting students at random to interview...
  • ryhend88ryhend88 Posts: 31Registered User Junior Member
    HAH

    I swear people on forums can be so funny, especially when talking about GPAs. I know plenty of people finding GREAT jobs with sub 3.0 gpas.

    I have also noticed, that people getting 3.5 plus GPAs tend to be lacking... other life skills, that is, they tend not to be well-rounded individuals. I don't like many of them, nope, not one bit. Of course there are exceptions!
  • WhatdidyouWhatdidyou Posts: 539Registered User Member
    spsp, wasnt trying to be a jerk. if that is what you meant, you should have said it the first time, you said nothing about taking harder classes..and i do know what an average is. if you think i referred to it wrong, then it is you that doesnt understand what an average is.

    norris, I was just pointing out that a recruiter typically does not consider a 3.0 gpa "good" nor a 3.5 "remarkable."

    ryhen88, idk. the top jobs tend to only interview students w/ high gpas, and dont even consider people with sub 3.0 gpas. I guess the recruiters at your school must be different. lol. the recruiters dont agree with you about prefering people with sub 3.5 gpas. if only.
  • workingATbig4workingATbig4 Posts: 317Registered User Member
    Ryhend. That has to be the most GENERALIZED statement I have read on this forum. You just group people's personality by their GPA?

    You would say that about people with 3.5+ gpa since yours is a low 3.1. Got news for you, I don't know ANY accounting majors that got meaningful work experience right out of college with sub 3.3 GPAs. And what world do you live in that people with sub 3.0 GPAs get good jobs? I haven't seen a college grad job posting without the requirement 3.0+ GPA.

    The resume thread you posted asked for people to give you chances at accounting firms...

    Big 4- 0% - All job postings require 3.3-3.5+ GPA
    Mid-Tier - 5%
    Small - 5%

    Small and mid tier tend to have 3.7+ GPA requirements. Good luck with your ****ty GPA and your "well-rounded personality".
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