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US Student Chances BrockU, UWindsor, UWO, York

FlaPanthersFlaPanthers Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
edited October 2013 in Canada
Hello CC Canada,

I am currently a Junior in HS living in Florida, I would like to live in Canada for the rest of my life once I am out of HS. I have been looking around at various Uni's in Canada and would like to know my chances in those Uni's as an International Student.

UW GPA:3.79
PSAT (Multiplied x10 to match an SAT score): 1440 (plan to take SAT in winter)
Top 20% of Class

Course Load has been 4 AP Classes 2 Dual Enrollment and the rest Honors, I have not taken a single Standard class. Also I have taken 3 years of Spanish, not sure if that matters though.

Lots of EC's (I will list if needed but I know that Canadian Uni's don't look at them)

The programs I would be interested in would be either Sports Management (or Kinesiology with Sports Management focus where just Sports Management isn't offered) or a standard Business degree.
Post edited by FlaPanthers on

Replies to: US Student Chances BrockU, UWindsor, UWO, York

  • RudimentaryPeniRudimentaryPeni Registered User Posts: 14 New Member
    U windsor : safety it has like a 77% acceptance rate
  • alwaysamomalwaysamom Registered User Posts: 11,440 Senior Member
    Do you have dual citizenship? If not, having attended a Canadian university will not allow you to remain in Canada for the rest of your life. Upon graduation, you would have to go through the usual immigration process.
  • CatriaCatria Registered User Posts: 11,349 Senior Member
    York Schulich: Aim for 27+/1850+
    Brock U: Safety (SAT enters the fray when one has a ~3.0 GPA)
    U Windsor: Safety (aim for 1700+/24+)

    You can even aim for UBC Sauder or McGill Desautels (for the latter, French will help you should you want internships while there) if you somehow get 29+/2000+...
  • FlaPanthersFlaPanthers Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
    I understand that I will have to go through standard immigration; It is just through research that I have found it helps to have a Canadian degree when applying to jobs. I was just kind of stating that it is my intent to live in Canada post HS graduation.
  • JessicaalianeJessicaaliane Registered User Posts: 33 Junior Member
    I would like to ask how are you planning to pay for the tuition fee?
  • NamelesStatisticNamelesStatistic Registered User Posts: 558 Member
    Something tells me that a university educated American who has lived in Canada as a student for several years already will not have a particularly difficult time getting permanent resident status, or even eventually citizenship if you so desire. You being a hockey fan wont hurt your chances either ;)

    Here is some info on the status of foreign students in Canada after graduation. You don't exactly have to go through standard immigration. Instead you can apply for a "Post Graduate Work Visa" Which will allow you to stay in the country for a term of time equivalent to the amount of time you previously spent as a student.

    Stay in Canada after graduation
  • NamelesStatisticNamelesStatistic Registered User Posts: 558 Member
    By the way if you are in a tight financial situation the the University of Windsor, which you list, might be a good idea because it offers a cheap "American neighbour fee" tuition fee rate which I believe is $5000 per semester.

    McGill, Toronto, UBC or even UWO are more prestigious, but they are much more expensive.
  • alwaysamomalwaysamom Registered User Posts: 11,440 Senior Member
    Something tells me that a university educated American who has lived in Canada as a student for several years already will not have a particularly difficult time getting permanent resident status, or even eventually citizenship if you so desire.

    Of course, it's possible to proceed at some point after graduation to applying for permanent residence but it is very time consuming. The current wait times for any type of immigration related activity are ridiculously long. Difficulty isn't the issue, timing can be. The larger difficulty may be in finding a Canadian employer willing to take you on when your status in Canada isn't permanent. With the current employment difficulties for new grads, this isn't an issue that should be ignored.
  • NamelesStatisticNamelesStatistic Registered User Posts: 558 Member
    @alwaysamom
    I am not saying it should be, however as I said above, the best option is to get something called a "Post Graduate Work Visa" which assuming the OP takes a full bachelors degree will cover up to 4 years of residence in Canada after the OP graduates.
    That gives the OP 4 years after graduation to go through immigration and get full permanent residence status. The wait time may be long, but I doubt it will be anywhere near 4 years. The main gist of the part of my comment you reposed was that the OP's application would not likely be turned down by immigration.
  • alwaysamomalwaysamom Registered User Posts: 11,440 Senior Member
    I agree, it's unlike that it would be turned down. The PGWV, by the way, would be for three years, which is the maximum, even with a four year degree.

    Good luck to you, Flapanthers. As an America who ended up in Canada, I can tell you that your plan is a good one.
  • NamelesStatisticNamelesStatistic Registered User Posts: 558 Member
    @alwaysamom and Flapanthers
    Good to know the PGWV is capped at 3 years, I thought it went to four. Still, 3 years should be more than enough time to get permanent residence status. I have a few friends who are foreign students and have recently graduated from undergrads and even those who have not moved on to graduate school or professional school have not had trouble staying in the country. Canada is pretty open to accepting former students who previously choose to study at a Canadian university (It really makes sense, since these people are already living in Canada, and have an advanced education, which we know is of good quality, therefore these former students really are the ideal immigrants).
This discussion has been closed.