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Info about Carnegie Mellon (Mostly Tepper)

AcceptedAlreadyAcceptedAlready Posts: 2,634Registered User Senior Member
As a Tepper student I feel like I am most qualified to speak about my school though I tried to cover material that any applicant/prospective student might like to know.

Carnegie Mellon University was officially created upon the merge of the Carnegie Institute with the Mellon College in 1967. This makes the university the youngest in the current ranking of the Top 25 Universities in the nation. The business school went under the name of the School of Industrial Management until 2004 when David. A. Tepper (a wealthy hedge fund alumni) donated the second largest sum to a business school in the history of academia. Since then the school has been known as the Tepper School of Business or the David. A. Tepper School of Business. The university in its short life span has already produced six nobel laureautes in Economics and has risen to be one of the top undergrad business schools in the nation. The Tepper Business School boasts the highest median base salary upon graduation (tied with Wharton + MIT at $55,000). The school has evolved from its more technical roots and now employs both technological and soft skills to its education.

Carnegie Mellon has always been the forefront of technological advances and its students enjoy such luxuries during their years at the university. One example is the smart ID card which holds CampusXpress credits, school information, personal I.D., meal plan information including DineX and meal blocks, status of enrollment, and more. Carnegie Mellon also created the first wireless network with an ID (nicknamed Andrew). Carnegie Mellon is also the first university to employ Esuds, a laundry service that emails and notifies the student upon dryer/washer completion and allows the student to check the availibility of dryers/washers online without ever leaving the dorm room.

Carnegie Mellon has been consistently ranked highly and noticed for its amazing job network and post-graduate success. Examples include being "Recruiter's Favorite School", the nation's 6th "Most Improved School", Princeton Review's "Best Jobs", and last year's Newsweek's sole title holder of "Hottest College for a Job".

The school has enjoyed a huge rise in application number and prestige over its short life span and for 2006 the university overall received a 20% increase in applications (from 15,000+ applications to 18,000+ applications for only over a thousand spots). The 20% increase is the second highest increase of applications in the Top 25 after John Hopkins' 23% increase. The Tepper Business School has enjoyed more than a 50% jump in applications for 2006 and consequently reduced its acceptance rate to a low 19.23%.

For 2004-2005, the median base salary not including bonuses was $55,000 (tied #1 with Wharton). The school sent most of its students to IBM (5 students), JP Morgan (5 students), Lehman Brothers (4 students), Merrill Lynch (4 students), CGI-AMS (3 students), and other top companies. It should also be noted that all five students that went to IBM were hired as consultants. These five consultants range from managerial consultants to financial consultants and are regarded as the top of their respective titles. With "mode" companies such as these, only the Wharton School of Business can rival Carnegie Mellon's incredulous job network (as quoted by Newsweek's Article that listed Carnegie Mellon as a "New Ivy".).

The post-grad survey for the 2005-2006 class was even more impressive. This is thanks to the school's connections with firms like Lehman Brothers, Merill Lynch, JP Morgan, Duestche Bank, and Goldman Sachs (as well as CMU's campus in New York City itself). That is why a look at the postgrad surveys for 2005-2006 shows these companies as the "mode" companies (the ones that recruit the most grads) for CMU. http://www.studentaffairs.cmu.edu/ca.../salary/ba.pdf The median salary for 2005-2006 (base salary) remains at $55,000.

Location: CMU's campus is a secluded traditional green-college campus on top of a hill that is 5 minutes away from downtown Pittsburgh. At most times during the day and during party nights, downtown Pitt streets are crowded with cars and people on the sidewalks. This is because Pittsburgh is the nation's 2nd largest college city (after Boston of course). Upitt, Duquesne, CMU, Carlow, etc. all contribute to the city atmosphere if one walks downtown. Tall/huge buildings loom everywhere downtown as do countless bridges. There are electric streetcars and even homeless people. I believe CMU has the best of both worlds location-wise and while you got the college-town world captured, you are also just a few minues away from the city world.

Take a look at these pictures:
http://incline.pghfree.net/images/trianglenight.JPG
http://photographs.mccumber.us/540/b...ttsburgh03.jpg
http://www.downtownpittsburgh.com/Co...px?pid=0&cid=1
http://z.about.com/d/pittsburgh/1/0/...rgh_2-1024.jpg
[url]http://www.pittsburgh-pennsylvania-h..._picture_1.gif[/url]

Social life: Most people here are social but also very intelligent. Only a minority of the student body stays in their dorms all day and play World of Warcraft (though many social people also dabble in such activities). There are parties to be found every weekend (multiple, in fact) and there are always parties down at Upitt and the other numerous bars/clubs in the city of Pittsburgh. The student body is very diverse and the male to female ratio (while favoring the former), is becoming more equal. Workload during freshman year and the first semester of sophomore year is actually quite easy. Many students join frats/clubs during their first semesters. Most students tend to brag and exaggerate about how hard their classes are which generates most of the reputation with respect to the academics. However, this reputation also contributes to CMU's strong post-grad success as top recruiters and companies flock to CMU's campus during job fairs. For most students, the workload only gets "hard" during the junior year (and with certain classes such as Physics II and Operating Systems). Of course this depends on the individual and on the school (Comp Sci has a reputation for getting it harder while HSS/Tepper have a reputation for an easy workload).

Improvements: The application increase and the increasing strength in CMU's already sterling job networking has created new opportunities. The city of Pittsburgh recently acquired a young capable new mayor who is focused on restoring Pittsburgh to its former glory. New busineses are investing in the city including Google (who started a regional headquarters and hired a CMU professor to head it). A new Gates building (mostly funded by the Gates foundation) is also under construction at CMU and the Tepper School of Business is seeing improvements in funding, giving, and infrastructure.
Post edited by AcceptedAlready on
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Replies to: Info about Carnegie Mellon (Mostly Tepper)

  • HopeIGetIn89HopeIGetIn89 Posts: 35Registered User Junior Member
    i thought it was informative and helpful
  • laughingstock123laughingstock123 Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    Do you know if admission is more competitive for international students (who lives in the US)? What do they usually look for?
    My overall gpa is average but with an upward trend. Is that going to affect my chances?
  • Optimistic?Optimistic? Posts: 25Registered User New Member
    I applied to CMU Tepper, and I am worried about the social scene. CMU as a whole does not seem very social and "cool." What is your take on this? Also, Tepper has 100 student in every entering class, is it big enough to make the program successful and good? What kinds of careers do tepper undergraduates come out with? What types of majors within tepper are most popular? How much of the curriculum is liberal arts and how much of it is business.
  • homesizzlehomesizzle Posts: 63Registered User Junior Member
    Nice.

    I'm actually joining Tepper as an MBA student this fall.

    What kind of relationship does the undergrad portion share with the graduate portion?

    Do you get to interact with the mba students?
  • lfecollegeguylfecollegeguy Posts: 540Registered User Member
    Question: Do you know if admission is more competitive for international students (who lives in the US)? What do they usually look for?
    My overall gpa is average but with an upward trend. Is that going to affect my chances?

    Answer: Admission is definitely more competitive for international applicants. They look for a strong ability in soft core skills (strong verbal skills, communication skills, leadership, teamworking, etc) as well as strong quant skills. Upward trends in GPA definitely help and CMU does not count freshmen gpa.


    Question:I applied to CMU Tepper, and I am worried about the social scene. CMU as a whole does not seem very social and "cool." What is your take on this? Also, Tepper has 100 student in every entering class, is it big enough to make the program successful and good? What kinds of careers do tepper undergraduates come out with? What types of majors within tepper are most popular? How much of the curriculum is liberal arts and how much of it is business.


    Answer: Carnegie Mellon is a very diverse crowd. Though it is known for being nerdy and you will see many examples of this, the crowd has gotten a lot better over the years and there are many social events and parties to go to during the weekend (mostly) and also the weekdays. It is pretty greek and organization oriented as far as parties go but they are still enjoyable and in recent years CMU definitely has more outgoing students. The Tepper Business School is successful not because of its numbers, and in fact may be partly so because of it. It is selective and does not rely fully on alumni for jobs (though they do help a lot). Tepper's strength is in its already strong reputation in the business world. For example, compare US news MBA rating of Tepper vs. the Wall Street Journal rating (#5 overall,#2 finance, etc). The Wall Street Journal ranking definitely rates Tepper higher on average and this is because this ranking focuses on RECRUITER opinions. Thus, the reputation of Tepper is its main selling point and the school has no need to expand its class size or rely on "handing out diplomas" in order to get more alumni.


    Question: "What kind of relationship does the undergrad portion share with the graduate portion?

    Do you get to interact with the mba students?"


    Answer: The undergraduate business students definitely use the MBA building a lot. Most of the relationships are built through TAs or meeting each other in the building but as far as I know there is not much interaction between the two age groups as some of the MBA students I've seen are in their 30s. You can definitely interact with the MBA/undergrad students but you may seem a little creepy unless you are within a 3-5 year difference or you go to an undergrad party and you don't look like you are 30.




    Hope that helped, more questions will be answered to the best of my ability. Tepper is becoming more selective every year so I'm not that good at chances so don't blame me if I say your chances are good and you don't get in. The acceptance rate last I checked was around 13-15% and it may only get more selective.
  • cmu2011cmu2011 Posts: 4Registered User New Member
    Question: "What kind of relationship does the undergrad portion share with the graduate portion?

    Do you get to interact with the mba students?"


    Answer: Some undergrad business clubs do try and interact with mba students for networking and mentorship purposes.
  • thisoldmanthisoldman Posts: 1,045Registered User Member
    "What kind of relationship does the undergrad portion share with the graduate portion?

    S had a entrepreneur class as a senior in HCI with MBA's. He was just turning 21 and of course the MBA'rs were older. Worked out fine. Couple of parties. He also had a senior ME entrepreneur class at the same time. He was real busy that last semester.

    As a unpaid intern/gofer for his advisor/mentor, he did special projects for her and her grad students. Unpaid but a few credits each semester.

    His Fringe Club had the range of classes. The upperclass people mentoring the lowerclass people.
  • lfecollegeguylfecollegeguy Posts: 540Registered User Member
  • khuang311khuang311 Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    do you kind of feel Tepper is neglected by CMU in general because of it's size (and it's popular SCS)? Also, in general how big are the classes.. I mean, since there are only 100 entering freshman, most of your classes are gonna be with the same people right?
  • RacinReaverRacinReaver Posts: 6,598Registered User Senior Member
    Don't worry, Tepper isn't ignored by CMU. The rest of us see you throwing frisbees around and actually having fun when it's not a weekend. :p
  • lfecollegeguylfecollegeguy Posts: 540Registered User Member
    Yes most classes are with the same people, but that builds a good network of friends and no.. Tepper gets enough attention from CMU. Also from the student body it is the school most likely to have its students wear its T-shirts and namebrand than other schools (though I'm not sure what this means).
  • Atomicbomb22Atomicbomb22 Posts: 399Registered User Member
    I've got a question. Hopefully you can answer :)


    How would you compare the opportunities of a finance degree from nyu stern vs one from tepper? I'm still deciding between the two, but honestly I'm leaning towards stern at the moment. Any insight will be helpful.

    Thanks in advance.
  • lfecollegeguylfecollegeguy Posts: 540Registered User Member
    Both are about the same, Stern has its location while Tepper has more individual focus, bit more diversity from finance (since at the moment I-banking is not doing so well) and is less tooth-and-nail as Stern.

    It basically just depends on you, if you want compare the postgrad salaries and modes. Tepper's is here http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/current-students/current-business-undergrads/career-center/surveys-and-employment-statistics/download.aspx?id=1414

    Median: 60k.
  • ILoveMyKidsILoveMyKids Posts: 71Registered User Junior Member
    Could you please compare Tepper with Goizueta? That's the choice DS is trying to make. We've been told to be wary of Tepper because it's too math-oriented, too computational. DS is more interested in an overall business education - particularly in entrepreneurship and management. Which school would be a better choice for him?
  • lfecollegeguylfecollegeguy Posts: 540Registered User Member
    Wharton is definitely first. After that, I would say Tepper (CMU), Sloan (MIT), Ross (Umich), Stern (NYU) are all about equal and this is true if you check the postgrad surveys. In fact, the #1 highest median salary from a Ugrad business school last year was Sloan/Tepper/Wharton.

    I would put schools like Emory's Goizueta a tier below that. This is my personal opinion from having friends in top Wall Street companies (alumni) and also from the post-grad employment surveys. You can see that Emory's mode companies isn't quite as accomplished. That isn't to say it isn't a great school, but Emory is definitely more known for pre-med and med (and of course, Coca Cola!!).


    Tepper is definitely more soft-core skill focused in recent years and honestly you can ask any Carnegie Mellon student which two schools are the least computational and easiest and they will say HSS/Tepper.

    If you do a Marketing or Management track, Tepper is not hard at all compared to the Math/CS/Engineering schools. In fact, I would say its quite easy to do very well and only go up to Multivariable (which is about as easy as my High School's AP Calc classes). In fact, I got an A in the math requirements in Tepper and a B+ in my high school BC Calc course so I'm sure your son will be fine.



    Good luck to you and your son!
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