Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community polls, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

Non-Teenage Activities

flower161flower161 Posts: 532Registered User Member
edited June 2011 in College Admissions
Recently, I read the book "How to Make Colleges Want You" by Mike Moyer. (Side Note: the book was really useful into learning on how to get an edge for college admissions so i recommend it to everyone +) )

For one of the chapters, the author talks about one major aspect into getting an edge: Non-Teenage Activities or NTA's for short. Basically, an NTA is anything that the average teenager would not do but would be more likely to be done by an adult. Examples they had in the book are becoming a TV/radio personality, volunteering at a medical clinic in Africa, and starting a business. I actually tried starting a business, but it turned into an epic fail.

Although the book gave advice on getting your own NTA, i'm still stuck at a dead end. So, i'm wondering if anyone else has ideas of NTAs because i think its a great idea that i dont want to give up on just yet.
Post edited by flower161 on

Replies to: Non-Teenage Activities

  • Seahawks506Seahawks506 Posts: 2,526Registered User Senior Member
    The NTA idea is interesting, but you tend to get yourself into an "NTA" because of what you love to do.
  • kameronsmithkameronsmith Posts: 1,691Registered User Senior Member
    It's easy enough to spin a failed business into a business. Just go with that.
  • flower161flower161 Posts: 532Registered User Member
    Thanks!! I'll definetly think about my business and if its something i really want to do and go from there =)
  • M's MomM's Mom Posts: 4,562Registered User Senior Member
    One great NTA is to work at a nonprofit whose mission you care about in a positions of increasing responsibility over time and in various functional capacities. For example, if you have computer skills, most nonprofits are in need of someone to help them manage their IT infrastructure (assuming they have any...). If you write well, help them with their newsletter, grant-writing, marketing materials. Are you a decent researcher? Find out if they have any questions about their client population that they would like to have answered and discuss how you could collect the data and analyse it for them.

    The possibilities here for a creative and intelligent high school student (or adult) are limited only by your time and ability. You will learn a great deal and, if you do a good job, get the kind of letter of recommendation that will make you really stand out from all the indistinguishable math team/newspaper editor/ key club presidents.
  • stressedoutttstressedouttt Posts: 4,081Registered User Senior Member
    I think that joining a non- proft and gaining a high position there would be more impressive than starting your own...
  • flower161flower161 Posts: 532Registered User Member
    Thanks guys i might try the non-profit thing if the business doesnt work again
Sign In or Register to comment.