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aspergers ivy league?

12lyncje12lyncje Posts: 130Registered User Junior Member
edited January 2012 in College Admissions
do you guys think kids with aspergers are common at ivy league colleges like harvard, yale, or brown? do colleges want to "recruit" these kinds of kids so they can be unique to the campus community? thanks!
Post edited by 12lyncje on
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Replies to: aspergers ivy league?

  • phurikuphuriku Posts: 2,748Registered User Senior Member
    No. Don't even mention it on your application. You'll basically be put in the auto-reject pile, even at MIT or Caltech, where Asperger's students congregate.
  • born2dance94born2dance94 Posts: 1,646Registered User Senior Member
    I know an aspie at Brown. Fortunately he actually created a great niche for himself there, with a close group of friends and a girlfriend. He really seemed to come out of his shell.

    As for "recruiting" them, I don't think so, but you never know.
  • twoplusthreetwoplusthree Posts: 33Registered User Junior Member
    If you can spin Asperger's into something that was an obstacle, and you were able to overcome it and do well, it would make for a great essay, and that could help you a lot.
  • born2dance94born2dance94 Posts: 1,646Registered User Senior Member
    If you can spin Asperger's into something that was an obstacle
    I don't think there is any "spin" necessary. Asperger's is undeniably an obstacle, and doing well despite it is telling enough to colleges without having to turn it into a sob story or journey of overcoming some uphill battle. Just be honest. I don't think any adcom would ever take Asperger's lightly; it is automatically assumed to be an obstacle.
  • twoplusthreetwoplusthree Posts: 33Registered User Junior Member
    But doesn't how affected you are matter, because if you have a very mild form, but are high functioning, then you couldn't really write about it. You could say although you gained an interest, maybe you had some other obstacles, like social problems right?
  • born2dance94born2dance94 Posts: 1,646Registered User Senior Member
    Asperger's is typical pretty high functioning. But anyone who knows anything about the Autism Spectrum knows that it is definitely an obstacle. It doesn't always affect grades, but it certainly affects a person's entire life, especially how they interact with people, which is a big part of learning. No need to turn it into a pity party. S/he should be proud of being a smart kid who did well, not capitalize on the Asp like it was a sob story. It definitely should be mentioned, perhaps s/he can even write the common app essay about it or write a separate essay in 'Additional Info' (because it is a part of who you are), but "spinning" into a sad "obstacle" is almost like saying it is something to be ashamed of, a horrible obstacle s/he faced.

    I don't know, maybe that's just my opinion, but I think it should A) Be addressed but B) in a positive way. It is a part of who you are, not a sob story in the making.
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11,544Registered User Senior Member
    So is there no spectrum with regard to how MUCH of an obstacle? Say from minimal to severe?
  • born2dance94born2dance94 Posts: 1,646Registered User Senior Member
    There is, but the OP seems to have pretty good stats. So I think it is better to view it in a positive light, something that s/he embraces as what makes the OP who s/he is. Turning it into a sad sob story is not the answer. Like I said, that gives such a negative connotation.

    The best essays dealing with so-called "obstacles" are the ones which embrace it instead of turning it into a chance to gain pity points from adcoms. Showing that someone is proud of what others might see as an impediment and being successful despite that is a lot stronger than giving in to the preconceived notions of it being horrible and "overcoming" it like it was a horrendous obstacle.

    By the way, the OP seems to have already applied places, so I'm guessing s/he is asking for either or both of the following reasons:
    1) To see if s/he will feel welcome in that atmosphere/ knowing other kids have gone through it
    2) To see how adcoms might view the application now that it's been sent in/could it possibly be a "hook" even?
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11,544Registered User Senior Member
    ^That makes sense.

    Not sure if this is relevant, but this is the proposed severity criteria for the new "Autism Spectrum Disorder" that might replace Aspergers in DSM 5.

    Proposed Revision | APA DSM-5
  • twoplusthreetwoplusthree Posts: 33Registered User Junior Member
    "But anyone who knows anything about the Autism Spectrum knows that it is definitely an obstacle."
    Later in your post...
    "spinning" into a sad "obstacle" is almost like saying it is something to be ashamed of, a horrible obstacle s/he faced.

    So is it an obstacle or not?

    And how can you "embrace" it?
  • xquiksilverxxquiksilverx Posts: 463Registered User Member
    It is an obstacle, but the essay shouldn't necessarily deal with it as such. The essay should embrace it by talking about how, for example, they've come to know that as hard as it can be, it's a part of who they are and has shaped who they've become, etc. Alternatively, the OP could ask his/her guidance counselor to write about in his/her recommendation.
  • born2dance94born2dance94 Posts: 1,646Registered User Senior Member
    It is an obstacle, no doubt. But not one that should be viewed in a negative light nor "spun" to make a depressing story. So a positive obstacle, not a sad one.
  • danasdanas Posts: 1,781Registered User Senior Member
    I know someone who attended Brown with this condition. I know he made it the topic of his admissions essay. As I remember, he discussed it in a humorous way.
  • born2dance94born2dance94 Posts: 1,646Registered User Senior Member
    It would seem Brown is a good atmosphere for aspie kids. Everyone there is a bit quirky, so everyone can find a niche.
  • 12lyncje12lyncje Posts: 130Registered User Junior Member
    thank you guys so much for your discussion! haha i just want to mention a few things.
    1. I have already applied to all my colleges including ivies
    2. i mentioned aspergers in my essay; i dont want to talk about the specifics but i will say that I mentioned the struggles with socialization but was lucky to have the intelligence and curiosity to pursue science/medicine --> volunteer in hospital --> learn about medicine/hospital setting while making conversation and bettering social skills by speaking with doctors and patients.
    3 did that sound good?
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