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Does being in the IB Program help?

UltimateFrisbeeUltimateFrisbee Posts: 722Registered User Member
edited February 2006 in College Admissions
Does it help get you into more prestigious colleges since so much fewer students in America take IB classes compared to AP classes, so the colleges would want more IB students.
Post edited by UltimateFrisbee on
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Replies to: Does being in the IB Program help?

  • dufus3709dufus3709 Posts: 3,052Registered User Senior Member
    The number one thing is to take the most challenging curriculum possible. The consensus everywhere, though, is that IB and AP are about equal in terms of college admissions. Some high schools offer one or the other, or both, or neither. The adcoms will look at your hs profile. If IB and/or AP are not offered, it doesn't hurt you; but if they are offered, you pretty much have to take them. A 4.0 gpa without advanced courses in a hs that offers them is a very bad thing.
  • JoggerBlue82JoggerBlue82 Posts: 96Registered User Junior Member
    "A 4.0 gpa without advanced courses in a hs that offers them is a very bad thing"
    i hate how people take easy classes just to get a higher gpa. there are at least 5 people in national honor society at my school who have never taken an honors or ap class while there are people who do take ap classes but don't have a gpa that is high enough to be in nhs. it's not fair to them because they work so much harder.
  • commonsense34commonsense34 Posts: 83Registered User Junior Member
    "A 4.0 gpa without advanced courses in a hs that offers them is a very bad thing"
    i hate how people take easy classes just to get a higher gpa. there are at least 5 people in national honor society at my school who have never taken an honors or ap class while there are people who do take ap classes but don't have a gpa that is high enough to be in nhs. it's not fair to them because they work so much harder.

    Well than maybe they shouldn't be taking AP classes if they can't do well in them.And getting a 4.0 and taking no Ap or honors classes isn't a bad thing to do if you plan on going to an instate school which is still a great school,Like Uva,Ucla,Um,etc.
  • GospyGospy Posts: 669Registered User Member
    It's tough to get into instate schools without AP/honors. Last year UCLA took 410/7960 (5.15%) of students with less than 8 semesters of honors classes in 10th-11th grade. I'm gonna guess some of those are athletes.
  • maden10maden10 Posts: 304Registered User Junior Member
    DUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUDE, IB better help, or else, i'm gonnnnnnnnaaa,..jsdjhsjfsdhfksdjhsj.....!!!!!!
  • hazmathazmat Posts: 8,435User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    A gentle reminder to you that some of the top high schools in the US don't have AP.IB and get very nice numbers of students into the most selective colleges.
  • dufus3709dufus3709 Posts: 3,052Registered User Senior Member
    I said, though, that they only expect AP courses on your transcript "if they are offered".
    A 4.0 gpa without advanced courses in a hs that offers them is a very bad thing.

    Perhaps using the words "bad thing" may have triggered a response by some. Certainly having a 4.0 without IB/AP at a high school that offers them would not be a good thing at the extremely elite colleges. It won't keep anybody out of college, though.

    Also, as commonsense34 pointed out, large public universities are more numbers driven. I am not sure if I would put UNC-CH and UVA in that category. I have no idea what the UC schools do.
  • warblersrulewarblersrule Posts: 8,698Super Moderator Senior Member
    It depends a great deal on what colleges you're looking at. Universities in Florida go out of their way to attract IB students, as do a number of other universities. Duke makes note if you're in IB, and U Chicago seems to be fond of IB'ers as well. Others, like Caltech, say that they don't care what program you're in as long as it's challenging.

    Keep in mind, though, that if IB is offered at your school, many colleges would expect you to have taken it.

    dufus- If you're an in-state student and are doing well in IB, you're going to be accepted at UNC Chapel Hill.
  • Sephiroth226Sephiroth226 Posts: 687Registered User Member
    All I can say is that IB is a pain in the ass, but my teachers are excellent. I just hope my 3.5 looks reasonable with my courseload this year and every year.

    7 IB this year with 2 AP (3.4ish)
    6IB last year with 1 AP and 2 other (3.5ish)
    10th had 2 AP and the rest Pre-AP (toughest non-AP, 3.6 this year).

    4 HL, 3 SL, 5 AP or about a total of 16 AP's in terms of semesters.
  • chemaddict17chemaddict17 Posts: 423Registered User Member
    hmmm... when my ib coordinator makes speeches to try to get ppl to do IB, he always repeats the phrase "that's not to say that these people wouldn't have gotten into a fine university regardless"... and that's one of the more important things about IB - most ppl that decide to do IB (unless u go to a school where ur forced to do it) are motivated enough that they would have found something rigorous to do instead and would have been accepted to a fine university.. one thing IB isn't good for is taking it and not doing well, thinking that it'll get u into college easier.
  • maden10maden10 Posts: 304Registered User Junior Member
    when u say not doing well, what exactly do you mean? would a 3.45 be not doing well? like do you mean getting a couple of c's here and there.
  • Going The DistanceGoing The Distance Posts: 312User Awaiting Email Confirmation Member
    IB is more to prepare you for college than to get into college.
  • kpusa1981kpusa1981 Posts: 111Registered User Junior Member
    Study concludes that Florida high school AICE program graduates at the University of Florida achieve higher average GPA (3.46) than AP, IB and Dual Enrolled students

    University of Florida Director of Admissions, Bill Kolb, addressed faculty concerns about whether students given advanced college credits for freshman level courses through their participation in acceleration mechanism programs such as the Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE), Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB) and Dual Enrollment (DE) were performing as well at the University as those students who were taking the freshman level courses at the University before moving on to sophomore level courses. His study divided first year college students according to acceleration program participation and compared their average end of freshman year grade point averages (GPAs). The students from these acceleration programs were not only taking freshman level college courses, but sophomore level college courses during their first year as a result of earning advanced college credits. Acceleration group students had been compared twice before the Florida AICE program graduates arrived on campus. The first time he found that IB students (3.08) outperformed AP (3.02), DE (2.65) and non-acceleration program students (2.60). The second study found that AP students (3.12) had a higher end of freshman year GPA than IB (3.10), DE (2.75) and non-acceleration program students (2.63). When he reviewed the performance of Florida High School AICE program students he found that their average end of freshman year GPA was 3.46 – exceeding each of the other groups. Evidence that the AICE program not only prepares students for acceptance into universities, but to be successful once they’re there.

    What do you IBer's think about this?
  • hazmathazmat Posts: 8,435User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    Very informative and adds to the discussion.
  • dufus3709dufus3709 Posts: 3,052Registered User Senior Member
    The minor difference between AP and IB is almost certainly just statistical noise. I hate it when writers say something like "IB students (3.08) outperformed AP (3.02)." Wow, they outperformed them by 0.06. Like to run an ANOVA (analysis of variance) test on that. However, the 3.0 for AP/IB is probably significant over the 2.6 for non-AP/IB. I suspect the causal relationship is that the AP/IB students are more studious, but who knows. The really interesting thing is that AICE outperformed AP/IB by 3.4 versus 3.0. If AICE is a better program, then that would be important. However, statistics can be funny. Something like this that is just reported in a newspaper can be misleading, and probably needs to be looked at more. Two obvious things are the size of the statistical sample for the AICE participants and if there were any other factors differentiating the AICE group. For example, was AICE only offered at extremely competitive magnet schools when AP/IB was offered at a large number of public schools. Basically not enough info, but I'm sure somebody is looking at it.
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