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College Admissions Statistics Class of 2021: Early and Regular Decision Acceptance Rates

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Replies to: College Admissions Statistics Class of 2021: Early and Regular Decision Acceptance Rates

  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 9,371 Senior Member
    So having both is useful.
  • collegemomjamcollegemomjam Registered User Posts: 1,000 Member
    Comparing yields and overall admissions rates for colleges has never been less reliable based on all of the games many of the schools are playing with all of their different application options, making it easier than ever to apply, and varying levels of "solicitation".

    I remember a few years ago when my older daughter was applying to colleges (class of 2019) she kept getting emails from U Penn AFTER their application deadline telling her there was still time and that they extended their deadline to 1/10. Now do we really think that U Penn NEEDED my daughter to apply to give them enough choices to have a great class? Or do we think they wanted some more applications so they could try to get their admit rate under 10%??? Granted this is not a yield example, but it is an example of the game playing that is going on. I guess they are all trying to keep their high ranks.

    You really need to peel back the onion on some of these stats to decipher your chances of admission and the true yields. Comparing the Yield of a school with ED I and ED II to a school like UVA that has unrestricted EA is truly like comparing apples to oranges.
  • collegemomjamcollegemomjam Registered User Posts: 1,000 Member
    And as for the U Penn solicitation example, do we really think a school like U Penn would admit my daughter who would clearly only be applying as an after thought because U Penn told her they extended their deadline? I'd love to see the acceptance rate of the kids that fell for that trick and applied after 1/1 that year. Probably close to 0%.
  • CariñoCariño Registered User Posts: 122 Junior Member
    @collegemomjam I think it's like comparing apples, oranges, grapes and lemons. Every school has its own way to go through the application process, and we can not compare the outcomes of all of them as comparing one unique variable. It just doesn't make sense.
    - EA Restricted, RD
    - EA Unrestricted, RD
    - EA, ED1. ED2, RD
    - ED, RD
    Maybe another one?
  • collegemomjamcollegemomjam Registered User Posts: 1,000 Member
    @carino very well said....and you probably are missing some others...lol. Not to mention the intangibles like which schools are doing more mailings, waiving application fees, not requiring you send test scores,....lots and lots of variables! I'm glad my daughter is done. I have a son who is a freshman in HS....I wonder what things will be like when it is his turn in a few years!
  • CariñoCariño Registered User Posts: 122 Junior Member
    @collegemomjam
    My daughter is graduating from HS this week and going to UChicago (accepted in EA), and my seventh-grade son was a witness to the whole application process. His prediction is that by the time he is applying to college the admission rates will be negative :):)
  • collegemomjamcollegemomjam Registered User Posts: 1,000 Member
    Good luck to your daughter! My next door neighbor is at U Chicago and is thriving. He loves it and is doing very, very well. Handling the academics just fine and has made great friends from all over the country from all different backgrounds. My daughter is off to Georgetown in the fall, after weighing all of her options. My other daughter is at Boston College and just finished her sophomore year. 2 down, one to go. I'm hoping it's a bit easier for my son as the bubble has burst a little, but it all depends on how high you are aiming. Not sure it will ever get easier at the top schools. Good luck and I have enjoyed your posts!
  • CariñoCariño Registered User Posts: 122 Junior Member
    @collegemomjam Congratulations! Great schools and amazing cities!
    Thank you so much for your information about UChicago. Greatly appreciated! My daughter will love to hear that.
    Good luck to your son in HS and beyond!
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,310 Senior Member
    @spayurpets I got the number of applications from Caltech via email. This is overall, so EA and RD are not broken out.

    For class of 2021:
    Number of admits (not counting waitlist admits): 525
    Number of applications: 7339
    Admit rate: 7.15%

    Applications were up by 484 from 6855 (7%) in last year's Common Data Set.
    Admission rate was down significantly from 8.07% last year, though waitlist admits will bring this year's admit rate up a bit.

    If people want the EA vs RD rates, the person who gave me this data seems willing to provide more information.
  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 9,371 Senior Member
    Seems most of the schools with the lowest admit rates don't do ED at all, only EA or SCEA. A couple of exceptions in the top ten but overall, they don't play that particular game.
  • collegemomjamcollegemomjam Registered User Posts: 1,000 Member
    SCEA is a bit different thought because they know they are your first choice. But not the same commitment from an ED school.
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,310 Senior Member
    Somewhere IIRC there is an MIT blog that says they don't believe ED is moral because of its unfairness to low-income students. I expect Caltech feels the same way or at least is happy to do the same thing as MIT in this area. Until this year, I thought UChicago was the same.
  • collegemomjamcollegemomjam Registered User Posts: 1,000 Member
    That's a good point and is probably true. I mean, you can back out of ED if you convince them you cannot afford it, but I'm sure ED applicants with financial needs are a little more trigger shy because they need a school that they can afford. And sometimes applying to the EA schools gives them more opportunities for need and merit based aid. I wish the schools all had the same policy....let's just pick one and all go with it. Would make things a lot easier.
  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 9,371 Senior Member
    While students can back out of ED "if it isn't affordable" they can't compare, and some really need to compare. The difference between a $3k family contribution (I don't think any school expects less than that even to the very poorest students as they expect them to work summers and on-campus as well) and a $7k contribution can be critical to a family earning $20/k year. Can they round up work, loans,etc to cover the $7k/year? Maybe. Is it much better if it's $3k/year? Of course.
  • Dorothy28Dorothy28 Registered User Posts: 31 Junior Member
    Not sure if you're still interested in yield rates, but I know Bowdoin just came out today. 13.4 % admit/ 52% yield I think.

    http://community.bowdoin.edu/news/2017/05/record-setting-number-of-applicants-diverse-and-aided-students-for-class-of-2021/
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