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College Admissions Statistics Class of 2021: Early and Regular Decision Acceptance Rates

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Replies to: College Admissions Statistics Class of 2021: Early and Regular Decision Acceptance Rates

  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Registered User Posts: 4,773 Senior Member
    And is there someplace to find admit rate from last year at STEM schools such as Caltech and MIT by gender?
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,422 Senior Member
    @sbjdorlo By last year do you mean the Class of 2021 or 2020?
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,422 Senior Member
    @sbjdorlo I checked using the data from Caltech's 2016-17 CDS. The data in the WaPo article uses stats for the class entering in 2014. The stats for the class entering 2016 are similar but about 0.5% less than 2014 for both men and women. So, ~5.5% admission for men, ~15.5% admission for women.

    Stats for the currently entering class are not yet released, though the incoming class is 46% female.
  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Registered User Posts: 4,773 Senior Member
    Thank you, @Ynotgo. I remember seeing some stats like that from MIT some years ago, but the admit rate was *much* higher for women at the time. I just think it's nice when students (and parents and other family members) have an accurate understanding of just how selective these schools are for certain demographics.
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,422 Senior Member
    @sbjdorlo Also note that part of the reason that the admissions rate for women is higher is that the yield is lower. I ran the number using MIT's 2016-17 CDS:

    Female admit rate: 12.8% of ~6000 applicants
    Male admit rate: 5.8% of ~13,000 applicants

    Female yield: 68%
    Male yield: 79%

    Caltech has a similar ~10% yield gap between women and men.
  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Registered User Posts: 4,773 Senior Member
    Interesting yield rate numbers. Wonder why the difference. (Could be a thesis here) Thanks again. Very helpful.
  • SAYSAY Registered User Posts: 815 Member
    The reason as everyone knows is because many girls don't want to go to school in that environment. Remember that every student has an 800 in math and that sports is of little importance. That creates a very different culture than HPYS.
  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Registered User Posts: 4,773 Senior Member
    Well, I'm glad my son's wife wanted to go to school in that environment (they met at MIT and married 8 days after they graduated). :-)
  • whatisyourquestwhatisyourquest Registered User Posts: 582 Member
    edited September 24
    ^ Yeah, I don't get it. None of the women students at MIT or Caltech scored 800 in SAT Math?* Guys don't care about sports, but girls generally do? I'm totally befuddled.

    * I guess that Caltech is meant by the post, because the mid 50% at Caltech currently is 800-800 for the SAT Math II Subject Test, but that doesn't mean that "every" student scored 800. Also, I believe that the mid 50% for MIT is currently 780-800, so definitely lots of student at MIT scored below 800 on that test.
  • SAYSAY Registered User Posts: 815 Member
    edited September 29
    This means virtually every student has a near perfect score and in any given class the majority of students will indeed have scored an 800. Do you guys have a relevant point to make?



    Caltech SAT Score Analysis (New 1600 SAT)

    The 25th percentile New SAT score is 1530, and the 75th percentile New SAT score is 1600. In other words, a 1530 on the New SAT places you below average, while a 1600 will move you up to above average.

    Here's the breakdown of new SAT scores

    Section Average 25th Percentile 75th Percentile
    Math 790 780 800

  • whatisyourquestwhatisyourquest Registered User Posts: 582 Member
    edited September 29
    "The reason as everyone knows is because many girls don't want to go to school in that environment. Remember that every student has an 800 in math and that sports is of little importance. That creates a very different culture than HPYS." #1013

    @SAY There are several relevant points.

    First, your use of the word "every" is categorically false. You focus on Caltech in #1016; and you are right that lots of students at Caltech scored 800 on SAT Math, but certainly not all. Also, your response was to #1011, which also refers to MIT. At MIT, the stats suggest that roughly half (or more) of the admitted students scored less than 800 on SAT Math. So, more proof that your word choice was poor.

    Second, you seem to be implying that the yield rate at MIT and Caltech is lower for women than men because many admitted women conclude that they don't really want to be around other brilliant students. You perhaps think that it's intimidating? If this is what you are driving at, your reasoning is similar to the Google guy that was fired. Oh boy.

    Third, your comment about the interest of women in sports was baffling. What are you trying to say? That women (more so than men) choose a university based on the quality of the sports program? MIT and Caltech have no problem matriculating men, but many women decline because the teams don't measure up?

    Fourth, I agree that MIT and Caltech have different cultures than HPYS -- note that none have the word "technology" in their name. But why then would women apply to MIT and Caltech in the first place, if culture is a big factor? Do you think that they are trophy hunting? Or that MIT and Caltech lose out to HPYS because of cross admits? In that case, what evidence is there that women are applying in large numbers to HPYS (and being admitted), in addition to MIT and Caltech?

    Fifth, regarding the MIT yield rates quoted in #1011,

    "Female yield: 68%
    Male yield: 79%"

    Although the 11% difference between the male and female yield rates is interesting, a 68% yield rate is still fantastic and is not less than the yield rates for many other outstanding universities -- including Princeton, Yale, Penn, Columbia, UChicago, Brown, etc.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2017-01-18/universities-colleges-where-students-are-eager-to-enroll
  • suzyQ7suzyQ7 Registered User Posts: 2,957 Senior Member
    edited September 29
    @whatisyourquest Throwing political correctness out the window (and admitting you will not find a more "girl power" cheerleader than myself) there is nothing wrong with saying that MITs yield is lower for women than men because many women would prefer to be in a school with a less 'geeky' environment/culture - when they have other good options . You can be a high achieving technical female and still love cheering on great sports teams or being surrounded by a more "social culture" diverse student group.

    "Although the 11% difference between the male and female yield rates is interesting..."

    Its not just interesting - its understandable - based on what I mentioned above.

    "Second, you seem to be implying that the yield rate at MIT and Caltech is lower for women than men because many admitted women conclude that they don't really want to be around other brilliant students. "

    There is nothing in @SAY post that says that. MIT has not cornered the market on brilliant students. Maybe they want to be around a more culturally diverse student group of brilliant students.
  • whatisyourquestwhatisyourquest Registered User Posts: 582 Member
    edited September 29
    "There is nothing in @SAY post that says that. MIT has not cornered the market on brilliant students."

    The point that @SAY made was regarding 800 math scores and how that culturally is undesirable for many women. I don't know how else to interpret that comment, other than the way that I did. I am not making that case, btw. Certainly, there are many brilliant students at many other universities.

    I wonder if the difference in yield rate has less to do with culture than with the fact that there is a persistent imbalance with respect to the number of men and women on campus. At both MIT and Caltech, for undergrads, the M/F composition is currently 54/46. Not horrible, but still possibly a factor: significantly more men than women.

    There doesn't seem to be published data regarding cross-admits, other than what's available on Parchment. It would be interesting to know where women who decline MIT and Caltech chose to go. In other words, why some "high-achieving technical female(s)" turn down what are arguably the best two technical universities in the world. Obviously, one can have a great undergraduate experience elsewhere and also get a great education. I'm not saying that. I just wonder why more men than women would rather matriculate at the best.
  • SAYSAY Registered User Posts: 815 Member
    edited September 29
    No one said no girls want to go to MIT only that fewer girls make that choice. The 800 in math is a metaphor for the engineering school culture. An 800 in math at MIT, CT, or even Harvey Mudd is the standard score the vast majority will have obtained. I have two girls that had 800 in math. Neither had the slightest interest in going to an engineering school. Both instead went to large D1 top ten schools. The student body composition is vastly different and attending the Rose Bowl creates a far different culture.
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