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"Strength Training" or "Law and Society" Senior Year

Mooshie123Mooshie123 Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
edited May 16 in College Admissions
Ok, so here is the situation. I am currently a junior in high school and I am creating my schedule for my senior year. Because I have an internship at a court house for half the day for every day that school year, I will only have 4 classes my senior year. I am planning on taking English 101, Statistics 101, and AP Human Geography for three of them. I am also planning on taking AP micro economics online. Now I have only one block to fill but the options I have for that block are not good. I can either choose between a strength training class and a merit/unweighted law class that was described as "The easiest class you will take in High School". Although I do run track and plan to run in college, if I were to enroll in the Strength Training Class instead of the Law Class, how would that affect my application, especially because I do want to pursue a career in law. The only reason why I do not want to take the law class is because I am worried that it will be too boring and I will hate it.

With regards to academics, I am not the best student but I am also not a bad student. I scored a 1380 on my first SAT without much studying (retaking in June) and excluding AB Calculus which I received a C in, I have gotten an A in every single course I've taken (AP US History, AP Biology, AP Political Science, AP Psychology, etc.).

The main school which I would wish to get into is William and Mary.
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Replies to: "Strength Training" or "Law and Society" Senior Year

  • lvyBaelvyBae Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
    If you want to pursue a career in law, wouldn't you want to take law classes to test the waters? From my experience as a current high school/college runner, it might not be necessary to have a strength training class blocked out in addition to the sport. Stay focused on your training, use track as a motivation to know that something less boring comes after law class, and I think you should be fine.

    From an admissions standpoint, I think you should also consider how much track weighs on your application. Unless you think that the strength training class will make you a significantly better athlete/candidate for recruiting, etc., you might want to consider another class. From my experience, doing strength training classes didn't help as much, and you should have a training plan over the summer/pre-season anyways.

    My coach always emphasized that hard work was the reward. If I were in your shoes and interested in law, I might take that class, knowing that I had a chance to work hard -- and do what I love -- on the track afterwards.

  • Mooshie123Mooshie123 Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
    Thanks for the advice. The reason why I am not very interested in the law class is because my internship is in a court house, so I am unsure whether or not the class will be worth it if I am already getting first hand experience from the internship
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 60,947 Senior Member
    The way you describe the "law and society" course makes it sound like some of the courses I remember in high school that were nominally academic elective social studies courses, but were taught at a relatively low level (even by high school standards) so that marginal (C- / D+) students could pass to earn the required social studies credits to graduate high school. Is that actually the case?
  • CheddarcheeseMNCheddarcheeseMN Registered User Posts: 2,325 Senior Member
    edited May 18
    Given that you already are working at a court house, I agree with the OP that the law and society class doesn't necessarily have a great value added to the transcript. For me, the big issue would be if the gym class meant that I would have to go to the court house all sweaty afterwards. Is there a third choice? How much foreign language did you complete?
  • Mooshie123Mooshie123 Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
    I'm not positive if that is the way the class is structured but my guidance counselor described it as "The easiest class you will take in high school" but considering that every student has to pass 3 mandatory history classes and that is that class is not one of them it may just be an easy class
  • Mooshie123Mooshie123 Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
    The coach for the class said that I could have some extra time to shower so I will not be going there sweaty. I may be somewhat tired after but I am a relatively good athlete so I won't be like passing out. The third option is sign language, but I already have 4 years of Spanish and it is unweighted.
  • sushirittosushiritto Registered User Posts: 777 Member
    Being involved in "strength training" myself, I'd be curious to know what the curriculum is and what your event is for track and the strength training class will forward your track training.

    Ultimately, to me, it sounds like "six of one, half dozen of the other." Potentially, you might feel either class is a waste of time. And you do have the option of engaging a coach or doing strength training after school as well.
  • Mooshie123Mooshie123 Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
    I have marching band during the fall season so strength training would be part of my training for both indoor and outdoor track. This season I have run 200s quite a bit, but my main event is the 400. I want to try for the 800 but it's not a huge priority.
  • i_wanna_be_Browni_wanna_be_Brown Registered User Posts: 7,725 Senior Member
    I don't know what kind of courthouse exactly you'll be at or what the syllabus is for the class, but there's a lot to the law that doesn't happen in a courthouse so I wouldn't assume that a high school class called "law and society" is a waste just because you also happen to be interning at a courthouse.
  • HannaHanna Registered User Posts: 14,048 Senior Member
    edited May 18
    "I am unsure whether or not the class will be worth it if I am already getting first hand experience from the internship""

    I'm going to put this in the mildest possible terms. There is several lifetimes' worth of material to learn in the field of law. No judge at that courthouse has stopped learning. By the way, when you've had three years of law school, passed the bar exam, and you're practicing as a lawyer, you'll need 40 hours a year of continuing legal education, because even the most eminent law firm partners and law school professors don't know everything. Not even close.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 29,781 Senior Member
    It sounds like Law&Society aligns with your interests and would be a nice complement to what you'll be doing at the courthouse. It'll likely shed some light onto the things you see or hear. And even if it's the easiest HS class ever, it's still more academic than Strength training.
  • sushirittosushiritto Registered User Posts: 777 Member
    ^^^That may or may not be true depending on the strength training class. Besides the physical part of the class, hopefully the other 50% of the class will have human anatomy and Kinesiology aspects to it and potentially help with his track interest for both high school and college.

  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 60,947 Senior Member
    edited May 18
    sushiritto wrote:
    Besides the physical part of the class, hopefully the other 50% of the class will have human anatomy and Kinesiology aspects to it and potentially help with his track interest for both high school and college.

    One would hope that high school PE courses would include something other than "go lift some weights" or "go play some sport" such as practical instruction on such concepts as exercise intensity, duration, and recovery planning, injury prevention and recovery, etc. that could be useful life skills and knowledge. But is that actually done in high school PE courses these days? (Didn't see any of that when I was in high school.)
  • Mooshie123Mooshie123 Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
    No, the course is only strength training. The freshman PE class which our whole school was required to take covered some human anatomy and health related things. The strength training class is really only used by athletes who are looking to train during the off season.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 29,781 Senior Member
    Definitely Law&Society then.
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