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Federal investigators highlighted comments “associated with Asian stereotypes” at Princeton

Dave_BerryDave_Berry CC Admissions Expert Posts: 2,280 Senior Member
"... The documents that have yet to be released include the actual application files, the full comments from admissions officers, and — perhaps most important to those accusing Princeton of discrimination — detailed data about how many students of each racial group applied and were admitted, as well as their academic credentials." ...

Much more detailed article than most others about this investigation.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/mollyhensleyclancy/asians-very-familiar-profiles-princeton?utm_term=.yuMdWRegy#.bxkENy51D

Replies to: Federal investigators highlighted comments “associated with Asian stereotypes” at Princeton

  • prof2dadprof2dad Registered User Posts: 687 Member
    "Admissions officers were only asked once about a time when they explicitly mentioned an applicant's Asian background as a positive — a half-Korean, half-Hispanic applicant that the officer called a "neat blend.""

    How interesting! I am wondering whether there is another blend as neat as a half-Korean, half-Hispanic.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 62,091 Senior Member
    edited May 19
    prof2dad wrote:
    How interesting! I am wondering whether there is another blend as neat as a half-Korean, half-Hispanic.

    Not sure what you mean by "neat", but I have encountered people with all of the following ancestral combinations that some may see at more "unusual" (compared to white + one non-white race/ethnicity).

    * Latino + Asian.
    * Latino + other Latino ethnicity.
    * Asian + Black.
    * Asian + Black + White.
    * Asian + other Asian ethnicity.
    * Pacific Islander + Latino.
    * Pacific Islander + Latino + White.
    * Pacific Islander + Asian.
    * Pacific Islander + Asian + Black.
    * Pacific Islander + Asian + Latino.
    * Native American + Asian + White.
  • prof2dadprof2dad Registered User Posts: 687 Member
    "Not sure what you mean by "neat""

    I do not know what does it mean by neat in the context of racial blend. I simply followed the admission officer at Princeton and used the same word for the sake of curiosity. :D
  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 817 Member
    neat means someone that can contribute to the college based on their race or ethnicity.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,999 Senior Member
    I've encountered Latinos who were Asian. Also Africans who were Caucasian.
  • crimsonmom2019crimsonmom2019 Registered User Posts: 123 Junior Member
    Of interest to me are the comments about lack of 'cultural flavor in app' as it relates to URMs. Would seem to indicate that simply checking the box doesn't get an applicant as far as we might assume.
  • AnxMom2021AnxMom2021 Registered User Posts: 21 New Member
    Isn't it time to wipe out that checkbox section off the application for college? Recent news of racial division, all lives matter, BLM, LGBTQ, etc, why are applications for jobs, DMV, etc still contain that section. I am Asian myself, but I have relatives who are 1/4 Asian, 1/4 Caucasian, 1/4 Hispanic, 1/4 South American Black. So which checkbox should they check?
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 62,091 Senior Member
    AnxMom2021 wrote:
    I have relatives who are 1/4 Asian, 1/4 Caucasian, 1/4 Hispanic, 1/4 South American Black. So which checkbox should they check?

    They can check all that apply if they want.
  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 817 Member
    they should check the more than one race or don't want to identify
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,142 Senior Member
    edited May 21
    Here we go again with the complaints against affirm action.

    Note: "The investigators concluded that Princeton did not discriminate based on race or judge candidates solely by their race, instead using it as one piece in a broader picture of applicants."

    "...the investigation concluded years ago..."

    The group complaining is interesting. They assert discrimination, they are absolutely certain, because Asian American kids get rejected, then point to their own articles as proof.

    And what the heck makes anyone think “very familiar profiles,” “standard premeds,” or “difficult to pluck out” are used to refer only to Asian Americans?

    Most kids are very similar, nothing makes them stand out. Think about it. We see it all the time on chance me threads. Same old/same old. Any background.


    Adding. "Neat blend" refers to the perspective(s) the kid may bring to campus. It would need to be backed up by other expectations the applicant meets. While so many fuss over stats, rank, some dippy leadership titles, how many hours they vol'd at the cat shelter, the adcoms are trying to build a community that is academically able *and* vibrant.

  • Snowball CitySnowball City Registered User Posts: 1,263 Senior Member
    I don't have a fully formed opinion yet but something about preferring URM students who have "flavor bothers me. It smacks of placing an additional burden on that population. They wouldn't have the same freedom of choice of topics to write about for the application if they have to prove they are somehow authentic in however the reader perceives it. As if there is only one way of experiencing being a minority, as you fall on a sliding scale of How xx Are You.

    Neither of my kids wrote in their CA essays about being Latina. The ED kid's supplement didn't. The RD kid's supplements included a couple that asked about community and identity.

    Both had high scores from a rural part of a flyover state. Perhaps that factored more into their acceptances.
  • crimsonmom2019crimsonmom2019 Registered User Posts: 123 Junior Member
    ^^^ A post that makes me go hmmm...thank you for doing so.

    My kid did not write about being black but did write about how being black where he was often the only one or one of a very few shaped his thoughts about himself. High scores from a top independent school with activities and essay that had "flavor" would seem to have worked in his favor. While I hadn't thought about the additional burden on the front end, perhaps it lightens the burden on the back end? That it really isn't you simply get to check a box and get in which has created heated discussion here on CC (s/he doesn't even identify as XXX but checked the box to get in) and in many high school communities.

    Again, things that me go hmmm.....
  • DolemiteDolemite Registered User Posts: 1,550 Senior Member
    Neat blend could have referred to a cultural blend.

    Schools are looking for cultural diversity along with other institutional needs and not check boxes. My D could have checked the Native American box but she has absolutely no contact with the tribe so I advised her not to do so. She did check Hispanic because she's immersed in Hispanic culture including the language. Even though she didn't write about it every chance she had one of her Personal Narrative attributes is Global Citizen so she did write about it some depending on the essay.

  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 1,570 Senior Member
    If nothing else, it indicates how opaque the admissions process is. It's like making a cooking dish, with all the right ingredients added in the correct proportions. South Korean or white isn't very appealing on its own, but if you're 25% South Korean, 25% Hispanic, 25% Rwandan, and 25% European, you could be a super neat blend for the Ivy adcoms.
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