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Why is out of state tuition so high?

blackpen2008blackpen2008 Posts: 1,359Registered User Senior Member
edited August 2007 in College Admissions
For top public universities such as USC or UMich, why is OOS tuition almost double that of in state tuition? When a student is admitted, it costs the university the same regardless of where the student is from. Do universities receive state aid for in state students or is it something else? Any ideas?
Post edited by blackpen2008 on
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Replies to: Why is out of state tuition so high?

  • runforfun529runforfun529 Posts: 2,135Registered User Member
    Yeah. State Universities get money from the state in order to run. So, basically, the tax dollars the residents are paying to go fund the university, so in state students get cheaper tuition. Although, I do agree, it's getting pretty ridiculous for OOS at top Publics.
  • bpayne1bpayne1 Posts: 243Registered User Junior Member
    USC is the University of Southern California, which is a private school. If you mean the University of South Carolina call it South Carolina, because to call it USC is an insult to the Trojans
  • SCorBustSCorBust Posts: 196Registered User Junior Member
    listen to bpayne on this one
  • RootBeerCaesarRootBeerCaesar Posts: 1,377Registered User Senior Member
    They gotta make money somehow, and what better way than to leech it off poor OOS'ers?
  • blackpen2008blackpen2008 Posts: 1,359Registered User Senior Member
    It won't let me edit my post.
    Say for UMich
    Even the state of Michigan gives so much money per in state student, it's no where near how much extra it cost just for tuition to attend as an OOS student
    In state: $10,000
    OOS: $30,000
    Is there something I'm missing here?
  • blackpen2008blackpen2008 Posts: 1,359Registered User Senior Member
    The worst thing is even if you get a $20,000 scholarship, you're still where the in state students started.
  • JBVirtuosoJBVirtuoso Posts: 4,579Registered User Senior Member
    I think all tuitions are high, across the board. I don't know of too many budgets that can handle even $20k/year for in-state. That's one big chunk of money that's just gone.
  • UCDAlum82UCDAlum82 Posts: 1,065Registered User Senior Member
    In state tuitions are paid for by the taxpayers of that state. For instance the fine people of Michigan pay taxes so students living in their state will be able to afford a great university education and likely stay in their state. It does cost about $50K a year to educate a student. If the states are willing to pitch in for some of that money, they'd prefer they pitch in for students in their own state. So don't look at it as OOS tuition. Look at it as tuition, but people who live in that state all got a scholarship from the state.
  • More CowbellMore Cowbell Posts: 118Registered User Junior Member
    Some states are lowering the cost for out of state students; Minnesota is one (and I know that for at least one of their schools, Bemidji State, tuition is the same for in state and out of state). There are also consortiums of states that offer lower tuition to each other. It pays to do some looking around.
  • sakkysakky Posts: 14,759- Senior Member
    Do universities receive state aid for in state students or is it something else? Any ideas?

    The simple and idealistic answer is what was stated above by others: that state taxpayers fund state universities with the express goal of providing cheaper education for them.

    The darker, more realistic answer is that OOS residents obviously have no vote in state matters. So it's very easy to stick them with the bill.
  • barronsbarrons Posts: 23,547Registered User Senior Member
    Nobody forces any OOS students to attend. If they believe it is not a good value they all have their own state schools to choose from. It's market driven just like private schools with whom they compete to some extent for the OOS students. I could pay $40,000 to go to BU or $30,000 to go to Wisconsin OOS. For many the choice comes down to other factors.
  • RootBeerCaesarRootBeerCaesar Posts: 1,377Registered User Senior Member
    sucks though for ppl who want a low tution but high value college, but have a crappy state school system. (Cough SUNY Cough)
  • sakkysakky Posts: 14,759- Senior Member
    sucks though for ppl who want a low tution but high value college, but have a crappy state school system. (Cough SUNY Cough)

    Well, you could go to one of the statutory colleges at Cornell.
  • kat41911kat41911 Posts: 502Registered User Member
    sakky: Unfortunately, tuition at Cornell's contract colleges is more than 4 times regular SUNY tuition.
  • sakkysakky Posts: 14,759- Senior Member
    sakky: Unfortunately, tuition at Cornell's contract colleges is more than 4 times regular SUNY tuition.

    Yeah, but it's still cheaper than non-statutory Cornell tuition.

    Look, if you just want a low tuition, high value college, then perhaps you should consider those dirt-cheap private schools. For example, Cooper Union charges precisely zero tuition to all of its students. That's right - zero-. Of course, you still have to pay living costs, but hey, it's still zero tuition for all students. How many public state schools can say the same? Similarly, Olin College also offers free tuition to all of its students.

    You could also consider attending a military academy, which not only offers free tuition but also pays you a stipend. Hence, this is basically "negative tuition". While obviously you will then assume a military commitment after graduation, some of them are not particularly onerous. For example, graduates of the US Merchant Marine Academy can fulfill their commitment by working in the civilian maritime industry and maintaining a Reserve commitment for 8 years.

    For example, I know one woman who graduated from USMMA and then took jobs at various engineering companies like Siemens designing ship engines. It was a job that she liked and was probably going to end up doing anyway regardless of which school she went to. But USMMA gave her a completely free ride + stipend. Hence, she didn't have to pay to get the degree that got her the job she wanted - instead, she got paid .
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