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How long do I need to live in a state to be considered for in-state pay?

no4pointOno4pointO Posts: 18Registered User New Member
edited August 2010 in College Admissions
I live in California right now, but UMichigan is my dream school.
I have cousins in Michigan that could be considered my guardians on the app, but I wanted to know when should i move there to have enough time to be considered for in-state pay.
Post edited by no4pointO on

Replies to: How long do I need to live in a state to be considered for in-state pay?

  • RoxSoxRoxSox Posts: 2,179Registered User Senior Member
    It depends on the state and possibly if you could be claimed on their taxes (which might be tough). For me, I live in Florida, but my dad, who I don't normally live with, put me on his taxes in Wisconsin, enabling me to be considered a resident there. Often you may have to live there a year before you can be considered a resident (one year without being in college)
  • SikorskySikorsky Posts: 5,851Registered User Senior Member
    It does indeed vary by state, but generally, if you move to a state for the purpose of going to college, you're never going to be considered a resident for purposes of tuition. This tends to be true especially of states with well regarded public universities.

    This makes sense for a couple of reasons.

    First of all, the university already has you paying the higher rate. Why would they deliberately take less money for providing the same service?

    Second, and more important IMO, is a point about fairness. State universities are funded in part by the taxpayers of the state in order to educate residents of that state. Your family's taxes have been supporting public colleges and universities in California, and for this reason, you qualify for resident tuition there. You and your family have not been supporting public colleges and universities in Michigan all along. Why should you be entitled to the discounted tuition that Michigan taxpayers get?
  • drusbadrusba Posts: 7,871Registered User Senior Member
    Michigan presumes your residency is that of your parents and unless you are independent finacially from them you will have difficult time establishing residence. Also it lists as one of the the factors that will not establish residency is staying with other relatives while in Michigan.
  • memakememake Posts: 558Registered User Member
    In general, the way to become an in-state resident is to move to the target state, get a job and support yourself (including paying rent) from the proceeds of that job for a year, not be a deduction on any out-of-target-state parent's taxes, and not be enrolled at the target-state's public university for the year. In other words, to do this legally you have to take a year off from your college plans, and during that year you have to be able to support yourself from a legit job (with W-2's showing you earned enough to support yourself) in your new state. Variations exist, but most states have rules pretty similar to this.
  • SikorskySikorsky Posts: 5,851Registered User Senior Member
    ...and to do all that stuff above BEFORE YOU APPLY to your target university.
  • worried_momworried_mom Posts: 2,205Registered User Senior Member
    Here are the specifics regarding residency qualifications, taken directly from the UMich website:
    Residency - Office of the Registrar
    2. Dependent Students

    For University of Michigan residency classification purposes, you are presumed to be a dependent of your parents if you are 24 years of age or younger and (1) have been primarily involved in educational pursuits, or (2) have not been financially self-supporting through employment.

    a. Residents

    i. Dependent Student — Parents/Parents-in-law in Michigan If your parents/parents-in-law are domiciled in Michigan as defined by University Residency Classification Guidelines, you are presumed to be eligible for resident classification as long as you can demonstrate establishment of a Michigan domicile and severance of out-of-state ties.

    ii. Dependent Student of Divorced Parents/Parents-in-law — One Parent/Parent-in-law in Michigan If your parents/parents-in-law are divorced and one parent/parent-in-law is domiciled in Michigan as defined by University Residency Classification Guidelines, you are presumed to be eligible for resident classification as long as you can demonstrate establishment of a Michigan domicile and severance of out-of-state ties.

    iii. Dependent Resident Student Who Remains in Michigan When Parents Leave the State. If you are a student living in Michigan with your parents and permanently domiciled in the state as defined by University Residency Classification Guidelines, you are presumed to retain resident status eligibility if your parents leave the state provided: (1) you have completed at least your junior year of high school prior to your parents' departure, (2) you remain in Michigan, enrolled full-time in high school or an institution of higher education, and (3) you have not taken steps to establish a domicile outside Michigan or any other action inconsistent with maintaining a domicile in Michigan.

    b. Nonresidents

    The University presumes you are a nonresident if you are a dependent student and your parents are domiciled outside the state of Michigan. (See exception under a-i and a-ii for married dependent students whose parents-in-law are domiciled in Michigan.)

    Cousins who live in Michigan are not your parents.
  • T26E4T26E4 Posts: 16,927Registered User Senior Member
    Sorry No4point: You wanna go to your dream school which has been funded by my MI propoerty taxes? Great. It's a wonderful school and Ann Arbor is great. But you need to pay OOS fees.

    Same thing if my kids wanted to go to a UC school. I'd have to pay OOS fees because your parents' taxes support them.

    Make the moral choice and don't start off this era of your life being a cheat.
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