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Best laptop for Computer Science major!

ahmad716ahmad716 Posts: 1Registered User New Member
edited September 2012 in College Computers
Hi guys!
I'm getting into college in a month, and I was wondering which laptop is the best for my major?
I prefer a 13 inch with a good battery life and mid-low weight, nevertheless I'm open to take any suggestions you have!
Thanks a heap.
Post edited by ahmad716 on
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Replies to: Best laptop for Computer Science major!

  • vonlostvonlost Posts: 13,708Super Moderator Senior Member
    Whatever you get, be sure it runs BSD Unix.
  • adelaalanadelaalan Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    Lenovo and asus, apple, dell, hp are good
  • Cj3810Cj3810 Posts: 3Registered User New Member
    I admittedly don't know much about computer science and i'm in high school, but I work at bestbuy. I assume that you would want something that runs really well and brand doesn't matter as much as long as you get the right specs. I don't know about Mac but if pc look for something with an i7 processor. It goes i3, i5, then i7 with i7 being the best. Personally I like asus but anything would work with the right insides. Someone that knows computer science probably knows better than me but I home that helps a little
  • turbo93turbo93 Posts: 2,358Registered User Senior Member
    Find out if you're going to be using VMware to run virtual machines. If so, an i5 or i7, 8gb memory, and SSD, probably Lenovo in my experience (my daughter just dropped her T420 on carpeted floor, battery came out, no damage. I was blown away....

    Writing code on 13" is asking for trouble. 14" would be minimum in my view. As far as brand see what everyone else is using, and what software they use. If it's the usual tried and true stuff (Eclipse, Java, VS2010) then pretty much anything will do, if it's some off the wall software stick with what they know works.
  • TechhexiumTechhexium Posts: 624Registered User Member
    Don't insist on spending too much though except for gaming. Any mid-range computer nowadays can run virtual machines so you can run windows and unix at the same time. Personally I wouldn't settle for anything less than a Intel Core i5, and you can get such a decent laptop for $600-$700.
  • 4kidsdad4kidsdad Posts: 2,748Registered User Senior Member
    I don't think you need a powerfull laptop. All the works will be done on the computers / servers at school / department. You just need a laptop to login remotely.
  • OperaDadOperaDad Posts: 2,474Registered User Senior Member
    Find out what deals your school offers. Buy one of those. That will really help with problems if you need help from their IT dept. If you really want a small screen (for portability), buy an external monitor and keyboard for when you are in your dorm.
  • salim19salim19 Posts: 94Registered User Junior Member
    Do not buy a mac !!! Ill tell you why. I am a computer science major and I work with over 9 different computer science languages. First of all you must realize that specs dont really matter in your case. You are not looking for cpu power simply because you are running a basic program. One thing I do recommend is having a minimum of 4gb ram simply because all the visual basic compilers are take so much ram, and as a computer programmer you will face debugging processes that will require a good amount of ram. Another thing that you should know, is that if youre seriously a computer science major, youre not gonna be using you computer less than 5 hours a day, so dont buy something that breaks quickly, simply because sometimes youll get ****ed ans smack the computer, or youll stop being careful with it, and lets not forget almost all your school work will be on your laptop. You want something reliable, thus I would say go with either lenovo or asus. Lastly the reason i started with dont buy a mac, is simply OSX is not a good operating system to use for programming unless you are programming for iProducts. What I did was buy a nice lenovo t420 a year ago, this thing is running windows 7, Ubuntu, Fedora, Red Hat, and OSX. Its an amazing machine, which I occasionally drop, and mistreat, but it never gives up. And if something happens to if lenovo will cover it. You can literally smash the whole computer then ask them to replace it they will. Bottom line I say buy lenovo thinkpad series.
  • vonlostvonlost Posts: 13,708Super Moderator Senior Member
    Mac Air is light, has great battery life, is fast (no HD to seek), rugged (no HD to crash, solid aluminum), runs MacOS X and Windows legally with no hacking or warranty void. Do get 4GB RAM and as much SSD as you can afford.

    Send short emails to profs asking what they use.
  • salim19salim19 Posts: 94Registered User Junior Member
    Well the problem with the air is that its too weak to run windows and too expensive for what youre getting from it. and trust me the "solid aluminum" could be bent with the touch of a finger.
  • vonlostvonlost Posts: 13,708Super Moderator Senior Member
    If you're interested in an Air, go to your nearest Apple store and check out the "flimsy" aluminum. :)
  • bl4ke360bl4ke360 Posts: 679Registered User Member
    Everyone I know that has a macbook has a dent somewhere on it. I don't think it's a coincidence. Aluminum is guaranteed to dent even at the slightest hit.
  • vonlostvonlost Posts: 13,708Super Moderator Senior Member
    That explains why Apple, Samsung, Acer, Asus, Vizio and HP aluminum laptops don't sell. ;)
  • bl4ke360bl4ke360 Posts: 679Registered User Member
    Sales numbers aren't going to fix product defects
  • vonlostvonlost Posts: 13,708Super Moderator Senior Member
    There's hope for non-aluminum:
    Intel claims new plastic chassis will rival aluminum in quality, price
    June 4, 2012, 12:00 PM EST

    Intel has announced what it considers to be a breakthrough in structural design for Ultrabooks and possibly other portables. The chip maker claims it has engineered a plastic chassis which rivals the solid aluminum unibody case designs made popular by Apple -- a continuous aluminum frame machined from a solid block of metal.

    The new plastic chassis are expected to be a fraction of the cost and "equivalent in quality" to existing die-cast and machined aluminum frames.
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