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The Problem of Universals

JakorJakor Registered User Posts: 914 Member
edited December 2008 in College Confidential Cafe
Nominalist or realist? (or other?)

Nominalist - 1
Realist - 0
Post edited by Jakor on

Replies to: The Problem of Universals

  • JBVirtuosoJBVirtuoso Registered User Posts: 4,579 Senior Member
    Maybe some explicit term-defining would be of good order here.
  • JakorJakor Registered User Posts: 914 Member
    Nominalist- rejects the idea of universals (individual cases and particular exhibitionism of some trait may exist, but the trait cannot be tangibly defined by a universal definition; partially because universals are often relative (hot vs. cold, for example) and are defined upon a spectrum)
    Realist- accepts the idea of universals (universals are real and are the entities which one describes (eg. classification of objects))

    Sorry if my explanation is rambly. Wiki probably explains it better.
  • JBVirtuosoJBVirtuoso Registered User Posts: 4,579 Senior Member
    I guess I'll go with nominalist.

    Nominalist - 2
    Realist - 0
  • Russell7Russell7 - Posts: 1,414 Senior Member
    i lean toward nominalism as well
  • secretchordssecretchords Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    I'd say realist, simply because I've always been taken in with the argument of 'is my red your red'

    Of course, there is a significant chance that I completely interpreted the definitions wrong and now look like a complete fool.
This discussion has been closed.