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What does school/class rank really mean?

alkaline_nerdalkaline_nerd Posts: 4Registered User New Member
edited December 2008 in College Confidential Cafe
I'm in Delhi, and have taken up commerce/economics in grade 11 and grade 12. so when i write my rank, do I write rank out of the 115 who've taken commerce, or the total (115 commerce, and 130 science students) ?
Post edited by alkaline_nerd on

Replies to: What does school/class rank really mean?

  • ajwchinajwchin Posts: 378Registered User Junior Member
    I don't know what you mean, over there do you have to choose a particular "path of study" so to speak?

    Here your class rank is just out of everyone in your class; i.e. junior or senior or whichever one you are.
  • JBVirtuosoJBVirtuoso Posts: 4,579Registered User Senior Member
    I'm certainly not an expert on this, but I think your class rank would be your position amongst all of the students in your grade, regardless of study.
  • alkaline_nerdalkaline_nerd Posts: 4Registered User New Member
    all the applicants in the form are required to give their rank . Logically one must be just compared to those who are studying alike courses/subjects, and not to people who have different subjects. But what does everyone write their rank as, while filling their application forms?
  • rockermcrrockermcr Posts: 14,670Registered User Senior Member
    That's a tough question to answer. In North America, students don't generally follow specific streams of study, so the class rank is generally given in terms of the entire student body. I really don't know how this would apply to your case. Ask a counselor, maybe?
  • JBVirtuosoJBVirtuoso Posts: 4,579Registered User Senior Member
    Maybe you should email or call the admissions office of a top US university with a high percentage of international students. They probably know how to treat this sort of information, so they might have an answer for you.
  • AeroEngineer3141AeroEngineer3141 Posts: 3,607Registered User Senior Member
    It seems logical that your particular class rank would be out of students in your (commerce) class, not out of everyone. This is assuming that science students don't take commerce classes, and vice versa.

    If you did it out of your entire class, you'd have 130 students added to the rank who have never received a grade in the class. The guy with the lowest grade in commerce (115/115) would end up being 115/245. Which isn't right.
  • lil_killer129lil_killer129 Posts: 4,706Registered User Senior Member
    If you did it out of your entire class, you'd have 130 students added to the rank who have never received a grade in the class. The guy with the lowest grade in commerce (115/115) would end up being 115/245. Which isn't right.
    This doesn't make sense. The guy with the lowest grade in commerce will not necessarily be higher than every single kid in science. In fact, it's hardly possible... That guy will probably be like 240/245 or something like that if both commerce and science are put together.
  • JBVirtuosoJBVirtuoso Posts: 4,579Registered User Senior Member
    By "class", we don't mean individual courses. "Class" refers to all the students in that grade. The science students would have their own GPAs that would be used for ranking. I would guess that the GPAs of commerce and science students would be somewhat comparable.

    While it may not seem fair that you'll have to rank with the science students, we really have a version of this in the US as well. While we aren't required to specialize in high school, students do take either challenging courses (if they plan to go to college) or non-challenging courses (if they don't plan to go to college). However, all the students in a given grade are ranked together, regardless of what classes they took. This means that it's possible to take the easiest classes, get a 4.0, and be ranked number one in the class. Fortunately, that really doesn't happen that often, but it's possible.
  • bluebird123bluebird123 Posts: 148Registered User Junior Member
    This is definitely at tough question. IMO, you should write your rank out of everyone in your grade from your school, regardless of their subject. But, why don't you write both ranks? Explain why you included both in your application.
  • JBVirtuosoJBVirtuoso Posts: 4,579Registered User Senior Member
    Isn't it technically the guidance counselor (or some equivalent) who writes the rank anyway?
  • Qualia26Qualia26 Posts: 32Registered User New Member
    When you actually look at the dang thing, rank is difficult to gauge because not only does it include good students with the highest rankings, but also those taking easy classes to get the easy grades.

    I think many colleges realise this, so it's not weighted as much as say, your tests.
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