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American Students Moving To Europe For Free College

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Replies to: American Students Moving To Europe For Free College

  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,999 Senior Member
    @TooOld4School: Highest Oxford tuition for International undergrads is £23K/year or so: https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-fees?wssl=1

    It's also 3 years vs. (traditionally) 4.
  • HazeGreyHazeGrey Registered User Posts: 115 Junior Member
    S heading to Oxford next year. He's in the highest tuition degree program (Maths & Comp Sci). Between tuition (23kGBP), college fee (7k GBP) and room & board (5kGBP), at current rates, that cost is $45k. As a full fare payer, that feels like a deal to me versus the US alternatives.
  • foobar1foobar1 Registered User Posts: 148 Junior Member
    The relative transparency of admissions in European and Canadian universities (academics based) make them attractive to the students that don't want to play the holistic admissions game at American universities.
  • elguapo1elguapo1 Registered User Posts: 245 Junior Member
    @Hazegrey @Foobar1.. Where have you two been hiding, it was some hard sleding this weekend. @hazegrey save me looking, is that 3 years or 4 for that course? Even so if like me you don't qualify for finaid it's still a deal.
  • HazeGreyHazeGrey Registered User Posts: 115 Junior Member
    Three for the BA, you can stay for the fourth for the MMathsCompSci.

    And agree 100% with @foobar1 on the process. As a veteran of many math competitions, he was very comfortable with the MAT/interview process versus the crap shoot of the "holistic" approach. Was proven right in the end as he was rejected at all the top tier US schools he applied to except for a courtesy WL at his mother's Ivy.
  • elguapo1elguapo1 Registered User Posts: 245 Junior Member
    And there you have it folks!!!!! Well done @hazegrey Jr. clearly a clever fellow!!!
  • jupiter98jupiter98 Registered User Posts: 247 Junior Member
    edited April 11
    Was proven right in the end as he was rejected at all the top tier US schools he applied to except for a courtesy WL at his mother's Ivy.

    This is just nuts. As elguapo1 states, the system is broken. Well, their loss :) Huge congrats to your son @hazegrey
  • foobar1foobar1 Registered User Posts: 148 Junior Member
    I think this is one of the underlying reasons for the growth of honors colleges at the flagships. There are just too many academically qualified kids for the limited number of seats at the Ivy+ schools. The honors colleges are a good option for many academically excellent students.
  • elguapo1elguapo1 Registered User Posts: 245 Junior Member
    Mods close the thread.............we got there at post #95
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,999 Senior Member
    @jupiter98:

    One reason we see this is because the US is a huge country while our elite privates range from small to tiny compared to international counterparts (both of Oxbridge take in more undergrads than the biggest Ivy/equivalent, Cornell, does). Total places at all 30 schools I have as Ivies/equivalents, when taken as a percentage of the national population, is less than what Oxbridge+LSE+Imperial offer in the UK.
    Another is, yes, that different schools look for different things and are holistic. So among the American elites, Caltech is most academically focused in admissions, with no discrimination by race, legacy, or athletic ability. Northwestern has a 3 year program (ISP) that I believe is comparable to the Cambridge Natural Science Tripos and was founded to train research scientists. But many top STEM kids don't apply to those 2 for whatever reason.
  • jupiter98jupiter98 Registered User Posts: 247 Junior Member
    edited April 11
    @PurpleTitan I know the numbers, it still does not explain admission madness here. It is unfair to the kids to be subjected to the lottery. And they dont even know how many numbers they need to pick in order to win.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,999 Senior Member
    @jupiter98, rather, what numbers to pick.

    It is indeed an opaque and maddening process to those on the outside. It's not quite a lottery because the schools know what they want; how many of what types in their social engineering experiment.
  • TooOld4SchoolTooOld4School Registered User Posts: 2,606 Senior Member
    edited April 12
    @PurpleTitan , you are not including the mandatory college fees at Oxford, which add £7K to the £23K tuition, so it comes out to about £30K. (plus room, board, books and travel) And no American college student can be admitted to without enough AP credit to have the equivalent of 1 year of college in the US, so either way (US or UK), it is a 3 year program. There are definitely many less expensive unis in the UK, and the cost of living is less for a student, but the well known ones are pricey.
  • HazeGreyHazeGrey Registered User Posts: 115 Junior Member
    I would disagree with your comment about no American student being admitted without one year's worth of AP credit. and it being a three year versus three year comparison. Oxford accepts SAT2s in lieu of APs from American students. You get no credit for those. Plus, when we looked at how US schools would recognize AP courses, many only offered only advanced standing versus full credit. With the number of APs that my son has/will have (BC Calc, Comp Sci, Physics C (both), Econ (both), USH), the best result that we could figure out for him from the schools he applied to was skipping one semester at Princeton. In my son's case, his Oxford offer was covered by AP comp sci, physics c and calc bc. That's the equivalent of five US core courses (one semester of comp sci, two semesters of physics, and two semesters of calc) which translates into one semester total at most US schools if you can get credit.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,999 Senior Member
    @HazeGrey: Depends on what schools. For instance, at UIUC (which has a CS+math major and is one of the best CS schools in the US) the max amount of credit-hours you could get from those APs is 28, which is near the 30/32 credit-hours a student there would take each year: https://admissions.illinois.edu/Apply/Freshman/college-credit-AP
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