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does a withdrawal from a course look bad?

mangoluverinmangoluverin Posts: 27Registered User New Member
edited March 2008 in College Life
i am a freshman, and there is this course that I am taking that is going to kill my gpa. I want to withdraw from it, but a withdrawal will be placed on my transcript. i need a high enough gpa to get into certain fields like ibanking, but i also plan on going to grad school, and so i am concerned with how a withdrawal will look on my transcript to grad school admissions. any perspective would be appreciated.
Post edited by mangoluverin on

Replies to: does a withdrawal from a course look bad?

  • alethiometeralethiometer Posts: 275Registered User Junior Member
    If it's just your freshman year, it shouldn't have too much of an effect, if any, but just try to keep the number of withdrawals to a minimum, ie have this be the only one. If your grade won't be all that bad, then consider following through with it in case you need to withdraw from another, worse, class later.
  • nontraditionalnontraditional Posts: 519Registered User Member
    It won't look especially bad. Like alethiometer said, a pattern of withdrawals will look bad, but a single withdrawal or even a few withdrawals with a good reason ("I broke my leg over Christmas break and until January I didn't realize how many of the elevators on my campus are completely unreliable" is a whole lot different from "Eventually I realized that going to class was completely incompatible with my rum-soaked lifestyle") isn't too bad.

    However, if it's something you've got to take or if it's a class of a type you've got to take, you're going to want to prepare to do better the next time around. And if it's in a class in your major or in a subject that the faculty at your grad school take seriously, that's especially true.

    If it's a class your major requires, then depending on your definition of "kill" (there are people who can't bear to see their transcripts marred by a B and people who can't bear to see their transcripts marred by a D, and that's two totally different things) and the likelihood that you'll do better on a second attempt, it might be better to make a less-than-ideal grade in your freshman year and then move on to do better in subsequent years.

    Everybody makes mistakes, but what you're shooting for is to learn from them the first time you make them and to make fewer as your academic career progresses.
  • ticklemepinkticklemepink Posts: 2,764Registered User Senior Member
    They don't usually look too much on freshman grades because you're still adjusting- remember how adcoms ignore your freshman year grades? Same idea.

    But really try not to make it a habit. Do one for your freshman year but ONLY one in the rest of college. Absolutely not any more unless you have an amazing reason for it. I have 2 Ws- one was a fifth class and another was an administrative mistake that couldn't be fixed.

    Also what does it mean it'll kill your GPA? You're probably much better off biting into a C than a W because the adcoms in grad school will notice that and recalculate your GPA based on what grades/classes they think is important.
  • krnpsychopathkrnpsychopath Posts: 1,288Registered User Member
    i dont mean to hijack your thread but I have a question too

    I currently have a F in a class required for my major. If I take the class to the very end am I still allowed to retake the class?
    If allowed will my grade be the average of the two or the second grade?
  • mangoluverinmangoluverin Posts: 27Registered User New Member
    this is a psych course that am just taking. its not in my major, (astrophysics) and it isnt fulfilling any grad requirements for me. i probably am going to get a b in the course, but i think thts a good grade. the issue is i want to get into ibanking or sth, and these jobs have a 3.5 cutoff gpa. will ibanking firms look at transcripts, or will they look at only my gpa? and later on down the line if i want to go to business school, will this withdrawal hurt me? right now i am thinking of just taking the course and seeing if i cant pull up my grade or sth...
  • ticklemepinkticklemepink Posts: 2,764Registered User Senior Member
    You'll only pretty much list your GPA on the resume. Honestly, a 3.5 mostly a mix of As and Bs. So with that B you'll be fine!!! :)
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