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what jobs can you do with only a bachelor's in math?

mathematikmathematik Posts: 15Registered User New Member
edited March 2013 in College Life
I want to know what jobs the average math major with only a bachelor's degree in math can do. I don't plan on going back to school for a degree or to take additional courses. All I've got is a bachelor's degree and 5 years of experience doing quality assurance. Perhaps it's time to accept that my dreams were just dreams and aim for jobs that don't require a college degree?

Put yourself in my shoes. I'm still living on a budget, I still live with roommates, and I still drive a $5000 car. There is nothing wrong with being poor (at least that's what other poor people have told me) but when the job you have saps all the life left in you and you don't see financial rewards it's impossible not to question your purpose.
Post edited by mathematik on
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Replies to: what jobs can you do with only a bachelor's in math?

  • pandempandem Posts: 1,364Registered User Senior Member
  • mathematikmathematik Posts: 15Registered User New Member
    pandem, it's funny how when I search for jobs on job finding websites nothing comes up. I have never found a job listed on those sites where a person with my background was in demand.

    So, in theory, there are many jobs math majors can do. But when you search for those jobs, nothing comes up, or they require a lot more than a math degree.
  • pandempandem Posts: 1,364Registered User Senior Member
    Hmm... you're probably in the same position as every other non-tech major then. It's a tough economy. You have 4 options:

    1) Apply to jobs that aren't related to a math major
    2) Look harder and longer for those jobs that do relate
    3) Go back to school
    4) Start a business or something small
  • October47October47 Posts: 1,021Registered User Member
    Well, what jobs did you want to do in school? What were your dreams?
  • pandempandem Posts: 1,364Registered User Senior Member
    Also, broaden your search. Businesses always need math-smart people and aren't always advertising for an 'analyst.'
  • mathematikmathematik Posts: 15Registered User New Member
    October47, I did not have in mind any job in particular.

    pandem, if businesses aren't advertising for positions then where do I find those businesses and what positions do I apply for?
  • pandempandem Posts: 1,364Registered User Senior Member
    I couldn't tell you. I really don't know. You're in the job force now -- it's up to you. Nothing is guaranteed.

    Maybe Monster.com? Plenty of jobs only require a degree -- where do all the liberal arts majors go?
  • QKiainQKiain Posts: 61Registered User Junior Member
    mathematik - you probably won't see a lot of positions that require a math degree, but that doesn't matter.

    Anyone involved in quantifying performance uses math, so you're def qualified. Look for jobs related to statistics, modeling (not the victoria secret kind, we all wish), finance, etc.
  • mathematikmathematik Posts: 15Registered User New Member
    QKiain, thanks for the advice, but I have spent hours on job finding websites sifting through ads and I have never found a job for which I met most of the requirements. If it's a programming job, they say that degrees similar to computer sciences will be considered, but they want you to have extensive technical knowledge. If it's a financial job, they want you to have a degree in finance. If it's an accounting job, they want you to have a degree in accounting. And that's just the entry level jobs.

    Can you find an ad for a relevant job for which I am qualified and prove me wrong?
  • yg7s7yg7s7 Posts: 876Registered User Member
    This is why I didn't major in math, even though I would've enjoyed it. While many lucrative jobs like Engineering, Computer Science, Investment Banking and etc. are quantitative and math-heavy, I feel like math major itself ironically does not teach specific skills, unless you majored in Applied Mathematics or something. Just my $0.02

    But I'm surprised no one has mentioned becoming an Actuary yet?
  • October47October47 Posts: 1,021Registered User Member
    Quite honestly then this is a question that should have been asked & answered while you were in college. I know it's too late to turn back the clock now, but it's hard lesson many students learn too late.

    In this case I would say take a look at anything- anything- you want to do and see how you can get there. I read this book called You majored in what?! by Katharine Brooks that's about "mapping your future" and how to figure out how to get yourself unstuck from the impossibility of finding a job. I would suggest reading books like this that can help you figure out what kind of skills you have and what your major could be useful for.

    If you really don't think there's anything you want to do with a math degree then maybe it is time to start looking into other careers you might be interested in. Might as well change early rather than go through life being miserable and wondering why you never did.
  • mathematikmathematik Posts: 15Registered User New Member
    "Quite honestly then this is a question that should have been asked & answered while you were in college. I know it's too late to turn back the clock now, but it's hard lesson many students learn too late. "


    I asked the question while I was in college and the answer I received is the same answer I received on this forum: there are a lot of jobs you can do with a degree in math.

    To this day I haven't been able to find one of those jobs. Not even postings for those jobs. It's either teacher or actuary. Need I say that I am not interested in either job?
  • lkf725lkf725 Posts: 4,781Registered User Senior Member
    I wonder if, despite the economic situation, you may possibly be experiencing problems related to you resume, search techniques and interview skills. Yeah, it's really tough out there now, but try to be certain that you are not your own worst enemy. Good luck!
  • mathematikmathematik Posts: 15Registered User New Member
    "I wonder if, despite the economic situation, you may possibly be experiencing problems related to you resume, search techniques and interview skills. Yeah, it's really tough out there now, but try to be certain that you are not your own worst enemy. Good luck! "

    I really need help because, I admit, I don't know what or where the jobs are.

    Where are those jobs? Where are the job listings?
  • pandempandem Posts: 1,364Registered User Senior Member
    You need to look. You're a big boy now. You can start with a google search.

    Let me google that for you
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