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Grades- Do they measure intelligence or obedience?

ProtheroProthero Posts: 237Registered User Junior Member
edited June 2010 in College Life
Grades measure obedience, compliance and how well a student can jump through a teacher’s grading-policy hoop, in my honest opinion.

Your thoughts?
Post edited by Prothero on
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Replies to: Grades- Do they measure intelligence or obedience?

  • redfedora711redfedora711 Posts: 142Registered User Junior Member
    To me ...it seems like this depends on what class it is. I know that when I took German...it was essentially "agreeing with the teacher/spitting out her opinions" on the essay prompts and other papers in order to get the grade even if it was against what you thought it should be.

    Some people are just more open and some are not...I guess it's something that we all have to live through at times.

    Science/math classes are more dependent on intelligence and ability, in my opinion.
  • collegebound_guycollegebound_guy Posts: 574Registered User Member
    maybe in a subjective course like english or literature-type course where what you do is open to interpretation by the professor. math/science, no - you need to know your stuff to get a good grade.

    and how tricky can a grading policy be? I mean, you either put the effort in or you don't, and that is a reflection in your final grade. I don't get how you come to the conclusion that grades are all about how "obediant" you are.
  • gsteingstein Posts: 1,493Registered User Senior Member
    math/science, no - you need to know your stuff to get a good grade.

    To a certain extent, yes. But there are always people out there that will study nearly 24/7, see a prof for extra help/problems, perform better under pressure, etc. that can give them an edge over others who may be just as or more intelligent.

    In my opinion, grades group people into categories of intelligence, and from there it's up to the students' obedience to distinguish themselves in said category.
  • justtotalkjusttotalk Posts: 939Registered User Member
    IMO, they measure either intelligence or obedience. You can be intelligent and get good grades without giving a damn about the TA or professor. Or you can be obedient and know practically nothing.

    Obviously, you also have the choice to be both intelligent and obedient and go above and beyond the call of duty. This is not necessary to maintain a high GPA.

    I have found that classes where only midterms/final count tend to value intelligence more than obedience while classes with lots of homework and attendance policies value obedience. I could be biased, but I also tend to find professors who base entire grades on exams are more intelligent while those with many arcane policies don't seem as intelligent. Maybe they're catering to the type of student they used to be? Although it seems hard to believe that academia let an obedient idiot slip into tenure track positions.
  • crs1909crs1909 Posts: 1,217Registered User Senior Member
    I think grades are a mixture of course/professor selection, one's skill set ie good w/ numbers or good at writing, one's work ethic/ability to keep up w/ important assignments and just plain luck.

    If you pick the right classes that go with your skill set and keep up with the work, you'll most likely end up with pretty good grades. If not, your grades might suffer.
  • r0kAng3lr0kAng3l Posts: 1,682Registered User Senior Member
    It depends on the class, honestly. I do very well in classwork. I take AP courses and honors, and I would think that those classes would obey intelligence. Yet, according to my test scores I'm kind of average (24 ACT). It also depends on your teacher. Many teachers are extremely lenient with their grades and will inflate their grades dramatically. So, there are many things to look at when it comes with GPA. Class, teacher, etc.. A student can get a 4.0 by taking all easy classes all 4 years. Yet, a kid with a 3.5 could have taken 10 AP, but tried to challenge himself.
  • crs1909crs1909 Posts: 1,217Registered User Senior Member
    ^we be talking bout dem college grades
  • r0kAng3lr0kAng3l Posts: 1,682Registered User Senior Member
    Damn, then I wouldn't see how it would change. I mean, I do think with college grades are pretty much an obedience and intelligence. Because you have to study the most of the time to get the grade you want. Yet by the end of the year, you'll gain intelligence from the obedience :). Ehh, ehh? See?
  • Whistleblower1Whistleblower1 Posts: 633- Member
    After you meet the bare minimum threshold, GPA is inversely proportional to IQ because memorizational ethic uses the right side of the brain and thinking/sensing/intuiting, critical for IQ tests, uses predominantly the left side of the brain.

    The left side of the brain is critical for both reading comp/grammar and mental arithmetic, the key items tested in SAT/IQ tests. The right side of the brain is critical to listening and memorizing. Which do you think is more cogent for helping earn a Strong GPA?

    You only have so many red blood cells to power brain activity and one side usually excels at the expense of the other.


    -WB1
  • justtotalkjusttotalk Posts: 939Registered User Member
    Yet by the end of the year, you'll gain intelligence from the obedience

    I think you'll find in college that the "obedient ones" are the ones that actually don't gain the intelligence; they're working so hard and following the textbook precisely because they can't actually understand everything so they memorize the tidbits that they can't handle.

    The more intelligent students are far more flexible. They're the ones that don't complain/care that a question on the exam didn't mimic textbook examples.
  • r0kAng3lr0kAng3l Posts: 1,682Registered User Senior Member
    Is it bad to procrastinate in college? I usually do that in high school, yet still pull out a good grade. Would that hurt me immensely during college?
  • crs1909crs1909 Posts: 1,217Registered User Senior Member
    Is it bad to procrastinate in college?

    Well, it's definitely not good.


    I think you guys are making a bunch sweeping generalizations. History =/= Engineering =/= Economics =/= English =/= Management. Some classes require memorization. Some require a bunch of group work. Some require critical reading skills. Some require constant problem set practice. Etc... Different grades reflect different things.
  • Emaheevul07Emaheevul07 Posts: 5,924Registered User Senior Member
    I am inclined to think that if you are paying for a class, the intelligent thing to do is to do what it takes to get good grades, such as being obedient/compliant/whatever. It doesn't matter how smart you are if you don't get **** done.
  • WooflesWoofles Posts: 278Registered User Junior Member
    Grades measure obedience, compliance and how well a student can jump through a teacher’s grading-policy hoop, in my honest opinion.

    Your thoughts?

    Yes. My thoughts are that you're just another C student bitter about the success of the A students in your class, so you degrade their accomplishments by comparing their hard work to being obedient, compliant and whatever else.

    I mean really... if that's what you think of the educational system, then why the hell are you in it? Stick it to the man and get out and prove that real intelligence and success doesn't require a ridiculous degree.
    A good grade doesn't necessarily correlate with intelligence level, etc. but it does correlate to effort. Lets not get that confused with being obedient... what a joke.
  • SithisSithis Posts: 637Registered User Member
    I think that grades are a reflection of some combination of the following 3 factors:

    1) "Intelligence"
    2) "Mastery" of material
    3) "Obedience"

    Of course, one could quible about the definition of any of those terms, but the point is, I think that in total they are all reflected in a grade in some way. For example, a class could be based on 30% obedience, 30% intelligence, and 40% mastery, you get the picture. It would be quite a challenge to determine the exact %s for any particular class though; however, I don't think any class allows for "0%" in any of those categories.
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