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Anyone have ideas on a good match school (outside of Texas)?

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Replies to: Anyone have ideas on a good match school (outside of Texas)?

  • AroundHereAroundHere Registered User Posts: 1,931 Senior Member
    Hopkins is also on the collegeresults.org "dishonor" roll for having less than 15% Pell students -- which means there may be less economic diversity than other schools.
  • CrewDadCrewDad Registered User Posts: 1,478 Senior Member
    edited September 10
    @theminkim,
    I agree with gearmom that you seriously should consider looking at Brown. Fabulous university with an open curriculum. D2 came very close to applying ED. I've always been very impressed by Brown students and alumni.
    Providence is an exciting and vibrant city. Ease and cost of travel is an important consideration. Airfare from Dallas to Providence is very reasonable, and there are numerous flights per day. Leaning toward a match school, Vassar is extremely diverse, has very few core requirements, outstanding pre-med advising, as well as a new $125 million science facility.
    Brown and Vassar have a significant number of cross-applications. Wesleyan is another LAC worth investigating.

  • gearmomgearmom Registered User Posts: 1,501 Senior Member
    @AroundHere I was a Pell Grant recipient. I didn't know that was a thing until I came here. When I was in college I just thought it was a state grant sponsored by our senator, Senator Pell.

    Brown ED for the match. No guts, no glory. ;-)
  • gearmomgearmom Registered User Posts: 1,501 Senior Member
    edited September 10
    Well since @CrewDad is talking up Brown let me feed the fire and say, it's in a vibrant city. Federal Hill would be your ethnic Italian district. Authentic and good quality. A college town with PC, RISD, Brown. Artsy. An easy hourish train ride to Boston. An inexpensive bus ride to NYC. You can visit Newport. Take a ferry to Martha's Vineyard. Students won't be cut throat.
  • culaccinoculaccino Registered User Posts: 50 Junior Member
    @AroundHere noted. Thanks for letting me know!
    @crewdad thank you for the recommendation! I'm not sure how I feel about LACs however. I'm lucky to have my writing skills near my math/science skills, but I have little interest in the former. Is there a way I could see if LACs are right for me? I took a few generic quizzes but they didn't really answer my questions.
  • culaccinoculaccino Registered User Posts: 50 Junior Member
    @gearmom ED? Yikes I'm not sure about that..I feel like I would have to visit before making that decision, but I don't think there's time.
  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 6,947 Senior Member
    edited September 10
    Is there a way I could see if LACs are right for me?
    LACs tend to be colleges by the historical derivation of the word. That is, they gather students inclined toward academic pursuits in primarily residential, undergraduate-focused environments. They can be top-notch for neuroscience, psychology and pre-med, particularly if you value direct instruction and mentoring from senior faculty. Most activities, such as organizations, clubs and sports, will be highly participatory and generally accessible. They may be, and often are, in beautiful and snowy locations.
  • PengsPhilsPengsPhils Registered User Posts: 2,842 Senior Member
    This is a great thread with great help and suggestions and you seem to have a fine list going.

    In the start of this thread, there was some discussion about racial diversity versus integration. I just wanted to add that simply looking for the most integrated cities will often lead to cities with a lack of diversity as well, and finding both a diverse and integrated city is a pretty big challenge.

    https://priceonomics.com/the-most-and-least-segregated-cities-in-america/

    From my time spent living/visiting in a few of these, I've come to find that neighborhood segregation is more nuanced than just where people live. It's a big factor, but there's a big difference between a city where people regularly visit their own neighborhoods and one where it may not be considered safe. For example, Chicago is a textbook case of a true divide with the south side.

    Looking to find the balance between those two metrics will likely lead to a good combination of diverse and integrated.

    Good luck!
  • gearmomgearmom Registered User Posts: 1,501 Senior Member
    @theminkim ED, I think would have pushed you into match/high match territory, IMO. If you are out of time then you are out of time. You could try RD and revisit for grad school if need be. There would be an integrated diversity that you asked for.

    Maybe I'm missing something here. You didn't provide an expanded and detailed EC list but it seemed to me that you had leadership, took initiative, many volunteer hours. You stats can't get better. Some great recs and a solid essay and I just don't see how you wouldn't have been a peer candidate.

    Some of the matches are drifting into safety territory IMO.
  • culaccinoculaccino Registered User Posts: 50 Junior Member
    @merc81 so it seems LACs are the way to go...are there advantages that only universities can offer? I heard there is a strong writing-based curriculum in LACs, and I'm not sure I could do that.

    @phengsphils it's disappointing, but true that so many diverse cities are also very segregated. I'm looking into Boston--it seems to have a good-ish mix going, good schools, and a major airport (I'm a fan of plane spotting haha).

    @gearmom thank you for the compliment! I chose to have a more streamlined set of ECs that match what I'm passionate about. It's just that so many people tell me to be cautious--many of the very selective schools view thousands of applicants with stellar stats, and it seems that the people who stand out are national winners, publish papers, etc. I'm just not on that level. Also, I'm often an ORM since I'm Asian. I will definitely still be applying to top schools however.
  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 6,947 Senior Member
    edited September 10
    [Are] there advantages that only universities can offer?
    That's a great question, and honestly tough for me to address since I tend to post more frequently on smaller colleges. This thread has been an exception, and I've tried to adhere as closely as possible to criteria you have indicated (thus far) as being important to you.

    I heard there is a strong writing-based curriculum in LACs, and I'm not sure I could do that.
    Based on your writing on this thread, you would do fine. A strong writing curriculum, in any event, will be designed to enhance the writing of every student, but will not expect sterling writing from all students upon matriculation. Over time, however, you would learn to write with ease and confidence -- an important skill, and one that would make future academic and career endeavors easier, rather than harder.
  • apple23apple23 Registered User Posts: 323 Member
    edited September 10
    With respect to the emphasis on clear written communication at certain colleges, this quality is not unique to LACs:

    https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/rankings/writing-programs

    Brown, for instance, might have no fewer expectations in this area than Kenyon or Hamilton.
  • culaccinoculaccino Registered User Posts: 50 Junior Member
    I see, thanks for the information! I think I'll talk to my guidance counselor more about this.
  • AroundHereAroundHere Registered User Posts: 1,931 Senior Member
    Re: post 85

    The big advantage of a research university is its breadth of offerings. I have one child attending a LAC and a rising senior who is filling her college list with medium to large research universities. The biggest driver for my senior is her established interests in niche areas of science that aren't offered at smaller schools.

    The big difference is the personal attention at the LACs. We're trying to compensate for the lack of personal attention by looking at honors colleges at the bigger schools. We are already dealing with big school bureaucracy during the application and school visit process. The bigger schools have everything you need but it's up to the student to know what they want and be proactive and persistent to get it. If you don't make appointments and ask, the advisors and professors won't seek you out.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 61,522 Senior Member
    PengsPhils wrote:
    In the start of this thread, there was some discussion about racial diversity versus integration. I just wanted to add that simply looking for the most integrated cities will often lead to cities with a lack of diversity as well, and finding both a diverse and integrated city is a pretty big challenge.

    https://priceonomics.com/the-most-and-least-segregated-cities-in-america/

    This seems to come up with mostly the same conclusion as https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-most-diverse-cities-are-often-the-most-segregated/ -- that some diverse cities like Chicago are highly segregated at the neighborhood level, but other diverse cities like Oakland are much less segregated at the neighborhood level.

    Along with Chicago, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Washington, and Baltimore are highlighted in both articles as diverse but segregated.
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