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Ivy League full price vs UofM in state tuition?

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Replies to: Ivy League full price vs UofM in state tuition?

  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,698 Senior Member
    "Columbia is a totally different environment and a great school, but if it is better than Michigan, it isn't six-figures better."

    OMG. Price is NOT an object for this kid!!

    FYI, the Parchment cross-admit data (imperfect data but still data) says that Columbia thrashes UM on cross-admits 73% to 27%. That's made even more impressive when you consider that some portion of those UM admits would be in-staters getting a deep discount on COA.

    "Michigan is top-20 in almost everything and top-10 in most things. UCLA and UVA (especially UVA) can't say that."

    Don't you be messing with Mr. Jefferson's U. Parchment says the kids like UVA (#23 ranked by student choices) more than UM (#26). And UM undergrad hasn't beaten UVA in USNWR in like 25 years. Wa-hoo-wa!!!

  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 1,609 Senior Member
    OMG. Price is NOT an object for this kid!!

    Not sure what you are talking about here. OP asked the very question of whether Columbia is worth the additional $180k. Price is clearly an object. Even if the funds are there.
  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 829 Member
    "Don't you be messing with Mr. Jefferson's U. Parchment says the kids like UVA (#23 ranked by student choices) more than UM (#26). And UM undergrad hasn't beaten UVA in USNWR in like 25 years. Wa-hoo-wa!!!"

    You need to maybe stop with parchment and usnews (and other) rankings and maybe give better advice than look at the rankings for your decision. In this case that would be a disservice, a serious one, A CS major will be a fish out of water at Columbia but will be right at home at Michigan, access to labs, research, a technology culture that's not reflected in rankings.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 51,943 Senior Member
    Has anyone noticed that the OP was a new poster, who started this one thread/one post 4 days ago and hasn’t returned?
  • PengsPhilsPengsPhils Registered User Posts: 2,928 Senior Member
    @jym626

    Forget the OP, this is serious. Someone is wrong on college confidential! (Some poster had a great profile picture adapted from XKCD about this and I'm sad it's no longer present)
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 51,943 Senior Member
    It’s a tragedy...... :P
  • payubisoft1payubisoft1 Registered User Posts: 3 New Member
    Thank you for the comments everyone! NYC definitely has that extra appeal to me but the money of course is a huge drawback. I know that Michigan has the slightly higher CS rating, but I feel like there would be more opportunities in NYC? And there also is the possibility that I may change the CS major at some point. I am not a socially awkward person (like many CS people are stereotyped as) and I could see myself going more into the business/ management side.
    Do most CS majors end up in grad school/ is that the smart move?
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 51,943 Senior Member
    People who are “not socially awkward” don’t usually go around insulting CS majors. Just sayin’...
  • Much2learnMuch2learn Registered User Posts: 4,306 Senior Member
    Many CS majors do end up in grad school, but most of them work for a few years first. Also, there is not usually a large premium for a MSE on top of a BSE, but you may learn some valuable things. MBA is possible too but there are a lot of them right now, so getting into a top program is important.


  • payubisoft1payubisoft1 Registered User Posts: 3 New Member
    Definitely not trying to insult at all!! I know many people who are going into CS who are the most outgoing people I have ever met and I know that there is a very social aspect with it. However I personally have found the stereotype to be associated with it, and I have been told that people can't see me in CS bc "I am more outgoing person" (which I definitely don't agree with). I personally could see myself in any CS job but also going a more business/ management path with it. My point is that is something that I am considering looking more into.
  • AlexandreAlexandre Super Moderator Posts: 24,084 Super Moderator
    "I personally could see myself in any CS job but also going a more business/ management path with it. My point is that is something that I am considering looking more into."

    Management is a career track. It depends on your performance at work over time, not on the college you attended. Engineering/CS majors from both universities are recruited into a variety of jobs, not all of them technical. Many go straight into consulting or banking. As for switching majors, you may do so at both Columbia and Michigan, and still go on to have an excellent education regardless since both universities are excellent across virtually all disciplines.
  • PengsPhilsPengsPhils Registered User Posts: 2,928 Senior Member
    @payubisoft1
    I know that Michigan has the slightly higher CS rating, but I feel like there would be more opportunities in NYC?

    You will be able to get a job in any city after graduation with a degree from either, and recruiters from all the big companies will be on campus. I would say Michigan offers more opportunities.
    Do most CS majors end up in grad school/ is that the smart move?

    Most CS majors do not go to grad school at all unless they are planning to go into research or academia. If you plan to work in the software/business world, you will only need a bachelors degree.
  • SincererLoveSincererLove Registered User Posts: 487 Member
    Michigan has good business school too.

    D had interviews with an ivy league alumni, who told her that there was a research showing that for people who got accepted to both U Penn, and Penn State, years later, they were roughly at the same spots in their careers.

    I quoted an excerpt of her essay on college decision...hope that helps someone.

    "First and foremost, please remember that college is not the end destination; college is not where you should be peaking. No matter what college you choose, more times than not, your happiness and success at a college is a result of self-determination. A result of you, standing up and resolving, “I will be happy and successful.”

    Perhaps, most importantly, remember that college is a personal decision, a decision that can’t be decided by your parents, friends, or for that matter, absolute strangers that think they know your best interest. It’s you that’s going to college – not your Aunt Sally or your mom. It’s you, and you better be invested in your own education."

    Best of luck!!
  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri Registered User Posts: 5,752 Senior Member
    Have you applied to either of these colleges yet? If not, you really don't have a choice to make unless you're deciding whether or not to apply early (action/decision) to one.

    You haven't posted your stats so I don't know how competitive you are for admission, but even if you're competitive I hope you plan to apply to more than an Ivy League university and one backup. What other colleges are you considering?
  • i012575i012575 Registered User Posts: 386 Member
    OP, there is very little advantage, if any, in going to an Ivy league school for CS for undergrad. I work for a VC firm in the Bay area and am very familiar with the target hiring at some of the best start-ups and established firms.

    PayPal Mafia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PayPal_Mafia
    "PayPal Mafia" is a term used to indicate a group of former PayPal employees and founders who have since founded and developed additional technology companies[1] such as Tesla Motors, LinkedIn, Palantir Technologies, SpaceX, YouTube, Yelp, and Yammer.[2] Most of the members attended Stanford University or University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign at some point in their studies. Five members, Peter Thiel, Elon Musk, Reid Hoffman, Luke Nosek and Ken Howery have become billionaires.

    Even at one of my well-known competition (KPCB) - not strictly CS related - check out where most of them did their undergrad for CS or Eng.
    http://www.kpcb.com/teams

    Similarly, if you "google" the profile of the Google Fellows, most of these high flyers did not attend an Ivy for undergrad. In fact, the most famous of them, Jeff Dean ((after Brin (UMD) and Page (UMich) of course)), attended UMinn for undergrad and UDub for his PhD.

    What the above examples have in common is that these guys/gals attended some of the toughest CS/Eng schools, whether be it is the US or abroad (my alma mater IIT as an example) and did well there.
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