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Public Ivy Leagues

chris2k5chris2k5 Posts: 896Registered User Member
edited March 2013 in College Search & Selection
What are the public Ivy League schools? Anyone got a list?
Post edited by chris2k5 on
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Replies to: Public Ivy Leagues

  • principalviolaprincipalviola Posts: 2,418- Senior Member
    College of William & Mary (Williamsburg, Virginia)
    Miami University (Oxford, Ohio)
    Cal Berk
    Cal LA
    University of Michigan (Ann Arbor)
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    University of Texas at Austin
    University of Colorado at Boulder
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    New College of the University of South Florida (Now New College of Florida)
    Pennsylvania State University at University Park
    University of Pittsburgh
    State University of New York at Binghamton
    University of Washington at Seattle
    University of Wisconsin–Madison

    University of Vermont (Burlington)
    University of Virginia (Charlottesville)
  • vociferousvociferous Posts: 1,410Registered User Senior Member
    I think that is a pretty generous list. I hardly think the New College or SUNY Binghamton are public Ivy's as much as I value public universities

    My list is:

    Berkeley
    UCLA
    Michigan
    UNC-Chapel Hill
    Virginia
    Wisconsin
  • Here_to_HelpHere_to_Help Posts: 734Registered User Member
    According to Wikipedia:
    Moll, who earned his Master of Divinity degree from Yale University in 1959,[3] was an admissions officer at Yale, and the director of admissions at Bowdoin College, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Vassar College.[3][4][5] He traveled the nation examining higher education and in particular, identified eight public institutions (the same as the number of Ivy League members) which he thought had the look and feel of an Ivy League university. In addition to academic excellence, other factors considered by Moll included those that were visually like an Ivy League, aged as an Ivy League, had traditions like an Ivy League, and so forth.
    The original eight Public Ivies list by Moll (1985):

    * College of William & Mary (Williamsburg, Virginia)
    * Miami University (Oxford, Ohio)
    * University of California[6]
    * University of Michigan (Ann Arbor)
    * University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    * University of Texas at Austin
    * University of Vermont (Burlington)
    * University of Virginia (Charlottesville)

    Moll also offered in the same book "a list of worthy runners-up" and brief summaries of them:

    * University of Colorado at Boulder
    * Georgia Institute of Technology
    * University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    * New College of the University of South Florida (Now New College of Florida)
    * Pennsylvania State University at University Park
    * University of Pittsburgh
    * State University of New York at Binghamton
    * University of Washington at Seattle
    * University of Wisconsin–Madison

    "Public Ivy is a term coined by Richard Moll in his 1985 book Public Ivys: A Guide to America's best public undergraduate colleges and universities to refer to universities which "provide an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price."[1] Public Ivies are considered, according to the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, to be capable of "successfully competing with the Ivy League schools in academic rigor... attracting superstar faculty and in competing for the best and brightest students of all races.""

    I really think that size and attention to undergraduate teaching wise, some of the larger research oriented universities start moving away from the "public ivy" feel.
  • swish14swish14 Posts: 1,325Registered User Senior Member
    W&M is the quintessential Public Ivy.
  • AT9AT9 Posts: 681Registered User Member
    Here is the complete list in no particular order (from Wikipedia):

    William and Mary
    Penn State University
    Rutgers University
    SUNY Binghamton
    University of Connecticut
    Universty of Delaware
    University of Maryland
    University of North Carolina
    University of Virginia
    University of New Hampshire
    University of Arizona
    University of California- Berkeley
    University of California- Los Angeles
    University of California- San Diego
    University of California- Davis
    University of California- Santa Barbara
    University of California- Irvine
    University of Colorado at Boulder
    University of Washington
    Indiana University
    Miami University
    Michigan State University
    Ohio State University
    University of Illinois
    University of Iowa
    University of Michigan
    University of Minnesota
    University of Wisconsin- Madison
    University of Florida
    University of Georgia
    University of Texas- Austin

    31 schools in all.
  • RoaringMiceRoaringMice Posts: 233Registered User Junior Member
    To me, a public Ivy would mean a school that's a public uni, which ranks with the top unis in the US, and which has a prestigious name. Thus I'd pick:

    - Cornell (which, oddly enough, has some majors that NY residents get state school tuition for, and thus literally is a "public Ivy")
    - UC Berkeley
    - U Virginia
    - UCLA
    - U Michigan Ann Arbor
    - UNC Chapel Hill
    - UC San Diego
    - U Illinois Urbana
    - U Wisconsin Madison
    - Georgia Tech
    - William & Mary
    - West Point
    - Annapolis
    - US Air Force Academy


    I'd also add two more narrowly focused schools:

    - Mass Art (one of the top art schools in the US)
    - The Fashion Institute of Technology (one of the top 2 fashion schools in the world)
  • AT9AT9 Posts: 681Registered User Member
    ^ I agree with you for the most part, but I'd also expand that list a little bit to about 20 schools total.... I'd probably add UT-Austin, U of Florida, U of Washington, Penn State, U of Minnesota, and Ohio State to that list.

    And I'd leave out the art and fashion schools haha.
  • Cuse0507Cuse0507 Posts: 4,519Registered User Senior Member
    I would limit the list to the top 7 or 8 public schools; there aren't 20 schools in the Ivy League, so why should the "Public Ivy" league have a million schools in it?

    My picks:

    Michican
    UVA
    UNC-Chapel Hill
    UC-B
    W&M
    +Service Academies
  • principalviolaprincipalviola Posts: 2,418- Senior Member
    ^True...

    North Carolina
    Cal
    College of William and Mary
    Virginia
    Navy
    Army
  • AT9AT9 Posts: 681Registered User Member
    "I would limit the list to the top 7 or 8 public schools; there aren't 20 schools in the Ivy League, so why should the "Public Ivy" league have a million schools in it?"

    True, but the list wasn't just referring to the real Ivy league, it was also referring to Ivy-caliber schools (WUStL, Duke, Chicago, Stanford, Rice, etc...). So yeah, there aren't 20 schools in the actual Ivy league, but there are roughly 20 schools that could theoretically be in the Ivy league based on their quality. That's why I would say about 15-20, but not 7-8 or 30+.
  • UCBChemEGradUCBChemEGrad Posts: 10,048Registered User Senior Member
    Just use 8 of the UCs (sorry Merced, you're an expansion candidate; and UCSF you're just all medical)...all are close regionally, and could participate together in sports.

    UC Berkeley = Harvard (complain it focuses too much on grad vs. undergrad)
    UCLA = Princeton (most preppy like Pton)
    UC San Diego = Yale (good poli sci)
    UC Santa Barbara = Penn (good social life)
    UC Davis = Cornell (agricultural school counterpart)
    UC Irvine = Columbia (Irvine = NYC of master planned communities)
    UC Santa Cruz = Brown (most granola, i guess)
    UC Riverside = Dartmouth (isolated...only thing to do is drink)

    :D
  • FindAPlaceFindAPlace Posts: 4,706Registered User Senior Member
    UCBChemEGrad:

    Interesting way of comparing UCs to Ivies.

    Question for you that we didn't have answered on our tour of Berkeley: What makes Chemistry so awesome there that they've managed to create an entire college that is one department?
  • Sparkeye7Sparkeye7 Posts: 2,408Registered User Senior Member
    These are 'my' Top-20 Public Ivies (In no particular order)

    1. Indiana University
    2. Miami University - Oxford
    3. Michigan State University
    4. Ohio State University
    5. Penn State University
    6. Purdue University
    7. University of California- Berkeley
    8. University of California- Los Angeles
    9. University of Illinois
    10. University of Iowa
    11. University of Michigan
    12. University of Minnesota
    13. University of Wisconsin- Madison
    14. University of Florida
    15. University of Georgia
    16. University of Texas- Austin
    17. University of Maryland
    18. University of North Carolina
    19. University of Virginia
    20. University of Washington
  • UCBChemEGradUCBChemEGrad Posts: 10,048Registered User Senior Member
    Question for you that we didn't have answered on our tour of Berkeley: What makes Chemistry so awesome there that they've managed to create an entire college that is one department?
    FindAPlace,

    Berkeley's College of Chemistry also contains the Department of Chemical Engineering. It offers 3 majors: chemistry, chemical engineering and chemical biology. The chemical biology major is pretty new - it's Berkeley's undergrad biochemistry major. So, it doesn't just have chemistry.

    Berkeley is renowned in chemistry - mostly due to its contribution in chemistry research discoveries (plutonium was identified in Gilman Hall (chemical engineering building), Robert Oppenheimer started the Manhattan project, Berkeleium is on the periodic table)...it's the history of these discoveries that has built its reputation and attracted new scientists and students to study chemistry at Berkeley.

    The College of Chemistry is pretty small and has sort of a self-contained mini-campus that is quite unique. The newest building - across the street (Stanley Hall) is supposed to be a collaborative learning place...incorporating research teams from chemistry, biology and engineering disciplines.
  • simpson98simpson98 Posts: 749Registered User Member
    My top 8 (in no particular order):

    UC Berkeley
    UVA
    UNC Chapel Hill
    William and Mary
    UCLA
    UMich Ann Arbor
    UW Madison
    U Illinois Urbana Champaign

    As exclusive as the service academies are, they're still not universities as they really only offer limited studies. If we're just doing public schools in general, then I'd take out UW and UIllinois and insert West Point and Annapolis, but they're hugely different in terms of structure and environment.
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