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Best Pre-Pharmacy schools?

corey91corey91 Posts: 902Registered User Member
edited November 2010 in College Search & Selection
Any one have any recommendations that are on the east coast?
Post edited by corey91 on

Replies to: Best Pre-Pharmacy schools?

  • Polo08816Polo08816 Posts: 890Registered User Member
    Forget pre-pharmacy. Apply to a 6 year PharmD program straight out of HS. It'll save you time and money.
  • SingDanceRunLifeSingDanceRunLife Posts: 1,787Registered User Senior Member
    What Polo said. There are lots of schools on the East Coast with 6 year pharmacy programs. SUNY Buffalo, Albany College of Pharmacy and University of Rhode Island are three that I know of off the top of my head. (I have a friend who's going into pharmacy).
  • corey91corey91 Posts: 902Registered User Member
    I have been looking at the PharmD schools but they all have prerequisite college classes for admittance? I assumed that I would have to attend a "regular" college first to take those classes.
  • SingDanceRunLifeSingDanceRunLife Posts: 1,787Registered User Senior Member
    Some you do and some you don't. I know that at Buffalo you have to take prereqs and then apply, but at Albany you don't.
  • NeonzeusNeonzeus Posts: 1,234Registered User Senior Member
    My kid has been happy at Buffalo and will be a pharmacy student there next year. The prepharm advisor was very helpful. Buffalo is adding some new prereqs for its pharmacy program, which may make the program closer to a 3+4 instead of a 2+4.

    More schools are moving to make their programs grad programs, and the prereqs vary widely. Some schools require a year of calculus based physics, some require macro or micro-economics, some require anatomy or microbiology, etc. Meeting different prereqs if you plan on applying to several schools is tough. If you might be applying to several schools, you need to be very focused when taking electives to make sure they meet prereqs. You may also end up taking some summer school credits. This is a key reason why 0-6 programs or guaranteed admission programs are so desirable - especially since competition is stiff for openings through general applications. There are fewer and fewer 0-6 programs. Duquesne, for example, used to offer one but doesn't anymore. You probably have to go to each pharmacy school that you're considering to determine what it's prereqs are.
  • Polo08816Polo08816 Posts: 890Registered User Member
    ^ Congrats. If you have any questions about the 1st professional year that are general to most schools feel free to ask me questions.
  • sk8rmomsk8rmom Posts: 5,746Registered User Senior Member
    Forget pre-pharmacy. Apply to a 6 year PharmD program straight out of HS. It'll save you time and money.

    Polo, that may or may not be true, but I wouldn't recommend applying exclusively to 6 year programs. There are only nine 0-6 schools left (MCPHS, USP, Rutgers, URI, ONU, Findlay, St John's, STLCOP, Northeastern). Costs vary, especially for Rutgers and URI (instate vs. OOS), but of the three on this list that my D was accepted to this year, all of them would have required substantial outlays of cash/loans, even with merit scholarships and grants. For example, USP's top merit award is only $7K (if I remember correctly) and their COA is over $41K/year. Afaik, none of these school come close to meeting need, and most gap considerably. It may not be worth it, or even possible, for many kids to spend an extra $10-20K/year for a guaranteed seat from the starting gate. Also, three of these (USP, MCPHS, and STLCOP) are pretty specialized schools and their choice majors are fairly limited. The high attrition rate of most of the 0-6's must mean, for some, that they really didn't know if pharmacy was their niche or not. Imho, that's an expensive and somewhat limiting way to find out...especially if you have to transfer out to find what you're looking for.

    Corey, aside from the 0-6 schools, I think you should also look at some schools that offer early assurance options but are technically 2+4. Last time I looked, these include:
    Butler University
    Campbell University
    Drake University
    Ferris State University
    Harding University
    Howard University
    Mercer University
    Midwestern University-Chicago
    Nova Southeastern University
    Ohio State
    Oregon State
    Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Shenandoah University
    Sullivan University
    Albany College of Pharmacy
    University at Buffalo
    University of Colorado Denver
    University of Houston
    University of Kentucky
    University of Mississippi
    University of Nebraska Medical Center
    University of New Mexico
    University of Pittsburgh
    University of Toledo
    Virginia Commonwealth University
    Wayne State University
    Wilkes

    There are also some new PharmD programs starting up at existing colleges with early assurance (I think D'Youville in Buffalo is one) that may be worth a look if they're experienced in the health/life sciences and have recruited experienced faculty/administrators.

    Obviously, not all of these are on the east coast, and some give preference to instate students but looking at the public options, if any, available in your state may be illuminating. There may be others as well, such as Duquesne and St John Fischer, who don't have formal early assurance options but do give preference to their own pre-pharm students.

    This combined approach gave my D a choice of 8 schools with PharmD programs and allowed her to compare FA awards and other factors (ie. type of program, size, location, facilities, faculty). She ultimately chose a school she likes that fits her needs, with no/low loans, and that will allow her a broad range of other choices if she finds that pharmacy is not her true calling. It seems like a win for now, time will tell...Good luck!
  • Green_Apple5Green_Apple5 Posts: 282Registered User Junior Member
    University of New England in Maine has a 6-year pharmacy program.
  • sk8rmomsk8rmom Posts: 5,746Registered User Senior Member
    Green Apple, that's the new east coast school I couldn't think of earlier! Fyi, UNE is not an AACP accredited PharmD school. They will start their first PharmD class this year, and that class must graduate before they become fully accredited.

    Most schools that have a PharmD program also offer pre-pharmacy, including UNE. That's not a 0-6, it's a 2+4, meaning you must take additional steps (generally PCAT and some sort of interivew and reapplication process) after you finish your first 2 years (or more) of pre-pharmacy.
  • early_collegeearly_college Posts: 2,846Registered User Senior Member
    How about UGA and USC? I know they have good pharmacy programs. UGA would be great for instate.
  • Polo08816Polo08816 Posts: 890Registered User Member
    sk8rmom wrote:
    Polo, that may or may not be true, but I wouldn't recommend applying exclusively to 6 year programs. There are only nine 0-6 schools left (MCPHS, USP, Rutgers, URI, ONU, Findlay, St John's, STLCOP, Northeastern). Costs vary, especially for Rutgers and URI (instate vs. OOS), but of the three on this list that my D was accepted to this year, all of them would have required substantial outlays of cash/loans, even with merit scholarships and grants. For example, USP's top merit award is only $7K (if I remember correctly) and their COA is over $41K/year. Afaik, none of these school come close to meeting need, and most gap considerably. It may not be worth it, or even possible, for many kids to spend an extra $10-20K/year for a guaranteed seat from the starting gate. Also, three of these (USP, MCPHS, and STLCOP) are pretty specialized schools and their choice majors are fairly limited. The high attrition rate of most of the 0-6's must mean, for some, that they really didn't know if pharmacy was their niche or not. Imho, that's an expensive and somewhat limiting way to find out...especially if you have to transfer out to find what you're looking for.
    You bring up very good points.
    To be honest, I'm not familiar with the true costs of each program. It's been a while since I was admitted and I was considering only Rutgers pharmacy and no other pharmacy program at the time. Also I'm in a situation where I pay very very little for school each semester so I can't comment on the costs of each program for others.
    I think the OP should have defined more clearly what he/she meant by pre-pharmacy. I took it as 4 years of undergrad and then 4 years of pharmacy school for a total of 8 years. I did not take pre-pharmacy as 2+4 or 0+6 programs.
  • sunshinedadsunshinedad Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    Any PharmD program colleges straight out HS in the west area .Please help Thanks!
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