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Columbia Engineering

SeniorOhBoySeniorOhBoy Posts: 97Registered User Junior Member
edited April 2012 in Columbia University
How good is SEAS? I haven't been able to get any solid opinions on this. If anyone knows anything in particular about biomedical or chemical engineering at Columbia that would be nice too.
Post edited by SeniorOhBoy on

Replies to: Columbia Engineering

  • SeniorOhBoySeniorOhBoy Posts: 97Registered User Junior Member
    Does nobody know any general things about SEAS? Like how competitive a degree is in the job market or further education. Research, internships, anything?
  • twang10twang10 Posts: 141Registered User Junior Member
    I would like to know this too
  • actprep54actprep54 Posts: 91Registered User Junior Member
    I would like to know too. Is Columbia any good for Computer Science? Do graduates get jobs in traditional tech fields like Google? Also, exactly what jobs do they do in Wall Street (quant, trading, analyst, IB)?
  • broken_symlinkbroken_symlink Posts: 690Registered User Member
    Columbia is good enough for CS that you will be able to get a job at Google. My friend had two interviews for a summer internship at Google. He and another one of my friends will be interning at Amazon this summer. I also know of someone who interviewed at Microsoft.

    Even I had a CS interview at a smaller company in the city and I am a computer engineering major.
  • tirakontirakon Posts: 27Registered User New Member
    I know *many* people who've gotten internships at great CS companies. Among my friends, there were 3 interning at google, a couple at microsoft, one at foursquare, and another at amazon. And, by the way, I'm an English major who doesn't know very many comp sci people.
  • SeniorOhBoySeniorOhBoy Posts: 97Registered User Junior Member
    Do either of you guys know anything about competitiveness of non CS majors? (normal engineering degrees like civil, chemical, whatever)
  • isabelwhatxisabelwhatx Posts: 154Registered User Junior Member
    SEAS is not your typical engineering school. It is still overwhelmingly engineering, but you are still attending Columbia, and they try as hard as they can to give you a rounded education. Moreso in the College than in the Engineering school, but still-- they do. For instance, I am majoring in Applied Physics but also minoring in Music, something completely unrelated to engineering.

    It is no MIT in terms of hard engineering. If you want that, Columbia is not the place for you. Columbia Engineering IS the place for someone who enjoys engineering, but also enjoys other things.

    To give a good idea of internship opportunities, I'm a freshman and I have a paid internship at Bloomberg this summer. When you go to Columbia, a lot of doors open.
  • actprep54actprep54 Posts: 91Registered User Junior Member
    I think the question here is: Just because SEAS is an atypical engineering school, does it mean that SEAS doesn't provide students with adequate engineering opportunities in internships and research? I read that a third of Columbia Engineering's graduates go to traditional engineering jobs. So I don't think going to SEAS will cut off any job options in engineering.

    Is SEAS in any way inferior to a typical engineering school?
  • SeniorOhBoySeniorOhBoy Posts: 97Registered User Junior Member
    If SEAS is atypical as you say in that they try to make you well rounded, would that be in my favor if I want to go to med school?
  • kintang1112kintang1112 Posts: 3Registered User New Member
    Hi, actpre. I am wondering that if a third of Columbia Engineering's graduates go to traditional engineering jobs, where the other two third students go?
  • beard taxbeard tax Posts: 247Registered User Junior Member
    ~1/3 go into the financial services
    ~1/3 go to graduate school

    However, many students pursue masters because they can't find jobs so the graduate school numbers are inflated.

    Probably 20% of the graduating class hasn't found a job but wants one. Another ~10% is actually pursuing academia.
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