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Cornell's Yield Increases to 52.9%

mathstarftwmathstarftw Posts: 315Registered User Member
edited June 2012 in Cornell University
http://mathacle.com/college/Yield_to_Admit_Ratio_Class_of_2016.pdf

Looks like most top colleges this year posted some impressive gains in yield rate.
Post edited by mathstarftw on

Replies to: Cornell's Yield Increases to 52.9%

  • alias95alias95 Posts: 82Registered User Junior Member
  • melody10511melody10511 Posts: 274- Junior Member
    I was wondering though, does low yield rate mean more vacancy? I mean, schools admit students according to their class capacity right? So does it mean Cornell can admit at most 2800 more students for the freshman class?

    I'm sure schools take yield rate into account when choosing admits, but IF all the admits decide to enroll, will the schools be able to provide all the financial aid and housing for them?
  • mathstarftwmathstarftw Posts: 315Registered User Member
    Just to keep in mind, yield in for class of 2015 was 51.3% and the year before that was around 49%
  • memphismommemphismom Posts: 1,019Registered User Member
    melody - no - that is a very difficult task for the university - there is limited housing - and all freshmen are housed together on north campus - so the admissions office has to try to determine what % of the accepted will actually enroll...when that number starts changing - it makes their task harder...and ends up[ with the university some years being "over-enrolled" meaning housing gets really tight.
  • melody10511melody10511 Posts: 274- Junior Member
    Oh alright. That's pretty sad on the university's part I guess, admitting students knowing at least one in two of them will not attend.
  • memphismommemphismom Posts: 1,019Registered User Member
    actually, no. The yield got better.
  • applejackapplejack Posts: 1,478Registered User Senior Member
    Oh alright. That's pretty sad on the university's part I guess, admitting students knowing at least one in two of them will not attend.
    Why is that sad? Every university has to do that based on their expected yield and the qualified candidates they encounter. If they only accepted half the number of students they actually do, they'd only have about half their class full and that would be a financial disaster for the university. They can't predict who will accept their offer of admission so I don't see how they could operate any other way.
  • ColeneColene Posts: 959- Member
    This number is already better than that of many schools, as shown by math
  • SaugusSaugus Posts: 3,886Registered User Senior Member
    ^
    And the chart posted earlier in the thread. Surprising that Penn's is so high while Chicago's is so low. Expected Dartmouth to be higher as well.
  • OldMoneyOldMoney Posts: 62Registered User Junior Member
    I don't trust that chart fully since Chicago reported a 47% yield if I recall correctly.
    Surprising that Penn's is so high while Chicago's is so low.

    Penn's has historically been high since they use ED aggressively. It fills nearly half of its class every year through ED, meaning they have nearly a 100% yield for those applicants; that explains how it has a higher yield than even Princeton most years.

    What I find curious is why Cornell actually used its waitlist this year if its yield went up.
  • TskDbxTskDbx Posts: 371Registered User Member
    What I find curious is why Cornell actually used its waitlist this year if its yield went up.
    You also have to take into account the lower acceptance rate this year, so there are fewer students to actually matriculate initially.
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