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Replies to: Educational Attainment in America -- interactive data visualization

  • eiholieiholi Registered User Posts: 312 Member
    edited March 18
    The map is beautiful and mega data is so powerful. I can see that more educated people are in/around cities, big and small. Thanks @marvin100 for sharing.

    The other day I watched James Flynn on TED talking about the Flynn Effect: we are about 30 IQ points smarter than our grandparents solely due to education (mainly on logic and taking hypotheticals seriously which are key parts on the IQ test). Education is so important (and we don't need to go to Ivy Plus only).

    (If someone merges this education map and election voting map, please share.)
  • marvin100marvin100 Registered User Posts: 9,014 Senior Member
    edited March 18
    One of the things that this map reveals is that many cities and towns have very, very discrete divisions between educated and uneducated populations--often a single street, and that street often corresponds with ethnic/racial demographics.

    Check out Austin Blvd. in Chicago, the crazy little UWS "peninsula" extending into Harlem in NYC, Palo Alto proper vs. East Palo Alto (divided by Highway 101), Philadelphia (you don't need me to point it out--it's obvious), and so many other cities.

    We still are very, very segregated.
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