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Replies to: Article: "The hardest test of freshman year? Survival."

  • HarvestMoon1HarvestMoon1 Registered User Posts: 5,911 Senior Member
    I found this statistic surprising:
    In 2015, only a little more than half of students who enrolled in college in 2009 made it to graduation, with the largest percentage leaving after their freshman year, according to the National Student Clearinghouse.
  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 585 Member
    @ordinarylives I agree -- My kids freshman experiences by the colleges are a far cry from the drop and figure it out that I had in the 1981. My current husband and I took a TON of criticism from folks (you wouldn't believe how much) when we left our respective home states, got married and brought our children to a completely different state and started a new life when they were ages 14, 15, 17 and 18 -- everyone had to make a new way, find new friends, start a new school. You would have thought by what people said to us we were sending them to juvenile hall or something. IMO it made them resilient- they all know now that it takes a bit of time but it can and will happen and all so far are having (or have had) a great college experience. (and everyone fared just fine in HS as well)
  • MarianMarian Registered User Posts: 12,492 Senior Member
    edited September 13
    @frabgot, good point.

    The dropout rates at highly selective colleges are low.

    At my own alma mater, which is tied for 14th on US News's National Universities list, 97% of freshmen return for a second year and 94% graduate within six years.

    I think that probably at least 99% of them should have been there in the first place.
  • ProudpatriotProudpatriot Registered User Posts: 1,479 Senior Member
    "After a decade of building luxury dorms with private bedrooms, bathrooms and kitchens, a few colleges are beginning to move back to the basics"

    Where are all these posh colleges? I sent three kids off to college. They also attended summer camps where they stayed in dorms in colleges all over the country. All of their dorms were old and crappy. Where are these places?

    In all seriousness the reason so many kids drop out of college is that too many of them are going to college.
  • momofthreeboysmomofthreeboys Registered User Posts: 15,200 Senior Member
    Yup the 50 percent figure has been around a long time but it feels that unless a kid is failing high school off to college they go and if they haven't even blown their own nose in their life off to college they go.
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 11,106 Senior Member
    edited September 13
    Yet colleges that have become more selective in the past decade and now have high retention and graduation rates are denigrated as "gaming" the system and seeking to climb the rankings.

    Someone who has a 900 SAT and a 2.5 high school GPA should likely not be going to college. Yet there are many state directional and struggling private colleges that will admit them and take their tuition.
  • Much2learnMuch2learn Registered User Posts: 4,297 Senior Member
    edited September 14
    Our high school does a good job of telling students and parents that going to a top college does not really matter, which is good for them to learn.

    However, they do a poor job of teaching them that working to achieve a solid gpa and test score still matters because there is a significant correlation between them and the student's odds of completing college. Students and parent should understand that better and earlier.

    If it even encouraged them to improve their gpa by 0.1 and their ACT by one point, in aggregate, that would have a positive impact on graduation rates.
  • wis75wis75 Registered User Posts: 12,247 Senior Member
    Agree that not all students who go to college should. Years ago not as many chose a four year college.

    I disagree with the article stating freshmen have too many choices. Before a student starts in the fall s/he has a defined list of classes picked out with the help of an advisor.

    I also do not think college freshmen need the support level the article does. Those who are independent will thrive at many schools where there are large lectures. Others should be at other schools. We do not need to continue treating college students like the children they were.

    The part the author has right is the high school experience preparing students for adulthood. Less coddling, more decision making on the part of the student (less interference from parents in deciding classes is one thing).
  • Much2learnMuch2learn Registered User Posts: 4,297 Senior Member
    @wis75 "(less interference from parents in deciding classes is one thing)."

    I am interested in your experience with this. In my experience, parents being involved is a positive thing in most cases. Sure some take it way too far, but most parents are reasonable. The kids that seem to have the most difficulty are the ones with largely disengaged parents. Is your experience different from that?
  • luckymama64luckymama64 Registered User Posts: 177 Junior Member
    Having dropped my freshman daughter off to college about a month ago, this really hits home for us. Her school does a really good job of getting the students oriented before classes start, but the thing she finds disconcerting is the amount of time she has on her hands! We live a pretty structured life, and kids have a pretty regimented existence: school, home, sleep, start over. With only two classes a day, she has a ton of time on her hands--and no one to say, "Hey, why don't you do . . . now?" We suggested getting a planner and making an attempt to schedule her days. Are there any other tips?
  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 585 Member
    @luckymama64 I guess being a student athlete my daughter is not having the 'time on my hands' experience at all!
  • cobratcobrat Registered User Posts: 12,285 Senior Member
    We live a pretty structured life, and kids have a pretty regimented existence: school, home, sleep, start over. With only two classes a day, she has a ton of time on her hands--and no one to say, "Hey, why don't you do . . . now?" We suggested getting a planner and making an attempt to schedule her days. Are there any other tips?

    This really depends on the individual personality of the student as well as their experience during the K-12 stage.

    Some students require or enjoy a heavily regimented existence or having others direct how they spend most/all of their time.

    Others with more independent and/or creative inclinations tend to strongly chafe at and hate being subjected to the same.

    And most students tend to fall somewhere on the spectrum in between those extremes.
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