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What is the grading scale?

emoryguy980emoryguy980 Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
edited May 2011 in Emory University
At Emory what is considered an A, an A-, B+, and a B. Thanks!
Post edited by emoryguy980 on

Replies to: What is the grading scale?

  • bernie12bernie12 Posts: 2,604Registered User Senior Member
    4.0,3.7,3.3,3.0 respectively.
  • emoryguy980emoryguy980 Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
    Okay thanks but what is an A like is it a 95-100? What is an A-? Like as in numerically? What grade range is considered a 4.0, 3.7...
  • collegestu816collegestu816 Posts: 206Registered User Junior Member
    On Emory's standard, suggested grading scale it's:

    A 93-100 4.0
    A- 90-92 3.7
    B+ 87-89 3.3
    B 83-86 3.0
    B- 80-82 2.7
    C+ 77-79 2.3
    C 73-76 2.0
    C- 70-72 1.7
    D+ 67-69 1.3
    D 60-66 1.0
    F <60 0

    However all professors are free to curve the class, either up or down, in their own choice by changing these suggested cutoffs to something different, so this scale would only apply to profs who decide not to curve. Also note that emory doesn't give A+s or D-s. However, the conversion of letter grades to the 4.0 scale (to calculate GPA) will always be fixed.
  • emoryguy980emoryguy980 Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
    Wow seriously? Professors can curve grades? What if I had a 96 in the class, I could get a A- if they curved the grades down? Do they let you know if they will curve
  • collegestu816collegestu816 Posts: 206Registered User Junior Member
    Wow seriously? Professors can curve grades? What if I had a 96 in the class, I could get a A- if they curved the grades down?

    yes in principle that could happen, although getting an A- w/ a 96 is a bit extreme for almost any class, but i have seen a 95 or 96 as the minimum required cutoff for an A before....And besides, profs will more often curve up than curve down.
    Do they let you know if they will curve

    Most profs will tell you if they will curve or not, BUT for those that do curve only some of them will tell u the exact cutoffs for the curve or how exactly their curving formula is carried out. Others are more vague and secret about it and may try to dodge or refuse to tell everyone what their cutoffs when asked (mostly to avoid controversy) or may only say what a general target class average they're aiming for and nothing else. Some may never even mention it at all...In the last 2 cases ur best bet is to ask past students or look on LL's Class Comments.

    And to make grading even more confusing, some profs will change their grading scale during the middle of the semester, (which btw screwed me over last semester in my human phys class since the prof changed from making 90-100 = A, 80-89 = B,... back to emory's standard grading scale, and i had like 91 in the class...)
  • bernie12bernie12 Posts: 2,604Registered User Senior Member
    Yeah, generally they let you know. However, curving down grades is rare. Some profs. have an adjusted scale. Like Soria makes an A a 95, and many humanities profs. make it a 94 (same trend for B and C). Only place where grades are curved down is in the B-School as far as I know. Honestly they need that because their grades are insanely high (some not too challenging classes). I mean seriously, picture this. They can give 35% A grades in core classes in the B-School. The work in some of them is so easy that a 96% is an A- (basically, upwards to 15% of the class got above 96). That goes to show how many people have those grades. Not many legit science courses hit over 25-30% A-grades. Trust me, grades will generally be curved up in science courses.
    CollegeStu: The grades were pretty high in Human Phys., weren't they? Is that a possible reason they did that?
  • collegestu816collegestu816 Posts: 206Registered User Junior Member
    sort of, but not really (test averages were around 76-80 but the prof dropped ur lowest test grade and added up to 4% for EC papers and another 2% for attendance to ur final grade), though the only reason was that the bio department wouldn't let the prof (who was a part time/adjunct prof from GSU) use a GA tech-like grading scale that didn't give +s or -s.
  • bernie12bernie12 Posts: 2,604Registered User Senior Member
    Yeah, the bio dept. is probably kind of strict with grading if I remember. They curved down a bio 141 section my year. GSU does +/-, so I don't know where that dude got that idea from. I guess that Emory needs tiers. Many Tech classes are hard enough to the point that a B is a pretty good grade, but at Emory, a B- is the average grade (not as tough grading as Tech even many natural science courses here are tougher content-wise), thus a B is hardly considered good. Lumping every grade from 80-89 would be lame here I guess as most folks are getting these grades (whereas in many classes at Tech, a significant portion of the class makes C range scores and lower even after a curve). However, in easier Tech classes, they could benefit from +/-. I guess it just depends on the nature of the grade distribution for the class. Again for Emory, it's almost always low-mid 80s even in many sciences (course average, not test average), so differentiating Bs is a useful tactic. This often allows average to be centered at B-, not B because many actually get low 80s. And curved up classes are much easier to handle. In a class with an average grade of say 72, to achieve a "2.7" average, you don't have to take 1/3 of the 70 range scores and center them to a B and leave the others at a C. Instead, there is an actual grade for it, B- lol. Just center those in or around 72 to B- and maybe some of those with a high 70 (77-79) to a B. Though clearly the 80s and high 70s in reality are quite murky in terms of assigning a grade.
    I think they use the non +/- at Oxford.
  • emoryguy980emoryguy980 Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
    Does Morkin curve up? what is considered an A in her class? How about Calc since the professors are so random... Why does it have to be complicated lol, I guess I'll aim for 93+ (that was my goal in HS btw, and thats so weird how teachers can decide what is an A....)

    As far as human phys so there was no A-? Wow...
  • emoryguy980emoryguy980 Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
    Oh and I am a rising freshman so how do I get to the LL comments of professors?
  • bernie12bernie12 Posts: 2,604Registered User Senior Member
    I don't know if she does. Normally she doesn't. The only exception was one year, where her 142 class was doing really well on the midterms and then they got a 73 average on the final (must have been tough that year), so she scaled the grades a little. She made it so that the cutoffs were a little blurry (in other words, f a 91 may become an A as opposed to A-.
    Human phys. had an A- according to CollegeStu. At first, it wasn't going to and then the bio dept. intervened and said to apply +/-.

    On your desktop should be "college advising" (click on it). Then off to the right somewhere should be class comments.
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