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which is the engineering speciality w/ most demand?

tom725tom725 Posts: 586Registered User Member
edited September 2006 in Engineering Majors
Some people are saying its just not a good time to go into engineering. They say jobs in software eng is being out sourced and the demand for Aerspace eng is just too low.

So, basically is there any demand in Engineering?
Post edited by tom725 on
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Replies to: which is the engineering speciality w/ most demand?

  • designlessdesignless Posts: 17Registered User New Member
    engineers (new or experienced) at super low prices
  • katho11katho11 Posts: 1,533Registered User Senior Member
    Everything I ever see about BME says it's growing at a way faster than normal pace through 2014. Nanosystems Engineering's supposedly going to boom as well, but I dunno.
  • scorpscorp Posts: 994Registered User Member
    I treat engineering as a liberal arts major (still going for my BS though). Yay for business schools and law schools.
  • tom725tom725 Posts: 586Registered User Member
    i think majors w/ good demand in eng. are:

    1 biomed
    2 envirnomental
    3 agricultural
    4 industrial
    5 mechanical
  • aibarraibarr Posts: 4,248Registered User Senior Member
    Oh, there's plenty of demand for good engineers, everywhere. Don't let all these doomsday naysayers freak you out.

    I personally like the stability I've got with structural engineering, and civil engineering in general. The US's infrastructure is hitting the end of its lifespan, so civs are needed in spades to either do repair work to buy the government some time, or they're needed to build and expand the infrastructure. As a structural engineer, I've got a delightful amount of job security... When the market's good, people are going to be building, and I'll be designing structural plans for new construction. When the market's down, people are going to be investing in making their existing structures viable for a few more years, so I get to design repairs.

    (Sigh... who forgot to spray for **** this month...?)

    PS- Tom, industrial engineering? Seriously...? People aren't hiring industrial engineers anymore, they're hiring people from other fields, like mechanical engineering, to take those jobs... Industrial engineering programs are being cut right and left...
  • karthikkitokarthikkito Posts: 1,387Registered User Senior Member
    Everything I ever see about BME says it's growing at a way faster than normal pace through 2014.

    But how is the student body growing in relation to the demand? If the demand increases at a slower rate than the population of BioE's, it'll become increasingly harder to land a job.

    ;)
  • tom725tom725 Posts: 586Registered User Member
    really aibarr....could u explain more because i was considiring that major.

    what do you exactly mean? i thought the demand was pretty good.
  • tom725tom725 Posts: 586Registered User Member
    Quote:
    'Everything I ever see about BME says it's growing at a way faster than normal pace through 2014.
    But how is the student body growing in relation to the demand? If the demand increases at a slower rate than the population of BioE's, it'll become increasingly harder to land a job.'


    i think the no. Biomeds r increasin..it was about 7000 sth biomed eng in 02 and in 06 its about 10000 biomed eng
  • aibarraibarr Posts: 4,248Registered User Senior Member
    Main thing I've seen, as I said in my reply PM, is that operations management sorts of things have been taken over by people with other backgrounds, like mechanical engineering, or project management backgrounds, like MBAs.
  • peck191peck191 Posts: 531Registered User Member
    i agree with aibarr re IE...several schools are cutting the program all together
  • Cornellian#1Cornellian#1 Posts: 4Registered User New Member
    It also depends on which part of the country you are in....

    I myself am a Mechanical Engineer and for me a dream job would be working at a Car Company :). So, Midwest/West would be the ideal place. However there are lots of awesome jobs in the Northeast as well for Mechanical.
  • rocketDArocketDA Posts: 1,565Registered User Senior Member
    designless is retarded. no one listen to him/her.
  • sakkysakky Posts: 14,759- Senior Member
    PS- Tom, industrial engineering? Seriously...? People aren't hiring industrial engineers anymore, they're hiring people from other fields, like mechanical engineering, to take those jobs... Industrial engineering programs are being cut right and left...

    It depends on what part of IE and what part of the country you are talking about.

    I can agree that traditional factory optimization is on the decline and/or is being taken over by ME's. But other parts of IE, particularly the transportation and logistics part of IE, are growing heavily. As world trade expands and Internet commerce expands, more products have to be shipped to their locations, and so more people are being called to optimize supply chains and warehousing. Amazon, for example, hires a boatload of IE's every year to optimize its inventory and warehousing. UPS and FedEx live off of their optimized route schedules. These are topics for which ME's have little training, because you're not really dealing with machinery. Rather, you are dealing with inventory, supply flows, service levels, turnaround times, and concepts like that. It's "Imaginery Engineering" in a sense (that's what they say that IE's really are), but it's "imaginery engineering" with an important process, as a better distribution system can translate into big profits.

    I agree that many of these tasks are being taken over by MBA's. But you obviously can't get an MBA while you're an undergrad. So if this is the kind of thing you like to do, why not get an IE bachelor's, and then later consider an MBA? The IE then basically becomes a "mini-MBA".
  • redbeardredbeard Posts: 308Registered User Member
    I spent a little time dialing in the salaries of various engineers at various "levels" on salary.com. Their data is actually tabulated by zip code, so YMMV. I find that there's plenty of demand for engineers, at least where I live.

    Salary.com differentiates experience into five levels. Level I is just out of college, and Level V is between 8 and infinity years of experience. There are also three levels of "Manager", but the data is suspect. Managers, in their data base, earn only a few thousand more than level V engineers.

    Not all engineering disciplines are represented because this is taken from hiring data (and not from academic departments). Thus, this is the market "signal" about the demand, and not the supply signal.

    Here's the data (annual salary in thousands):

    Level BME....OR......Civ E........EE
    I.......50.3...58.3......54.7.......58.4
    II......58......71....... 66.6.......69.8
    III.....70.5....89........80.4........83.9
    IV.....82.3....116.2....93.5.......95.1
    V......95.5....132.6....100.8......110.7
  • tom725tom725 Posts: 586Registered User Member
    thats the average i'm guessing.

    i'm surprised to see E E's earn that much!
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