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Petroleum Engineering program at the University of Houston?

drill4itdrill4it Posts: 3Registered User New Member
edited March 2009 in Engineering Majors
I just found out that the University of Houston is starting an undergraduate program in petroleum engineering for the Fall of 2009.

How is the school for engineering?

Has anyone completed other engineering programs at the U of H? Is a 4 year completion track the norm or is it more like 5?

How do they stack up to programs like LSU or ULL for engineering?

Has anyone completed or currently enrolled in the Petro Eng masters program at the U of H?
Post edited by drill4it on
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Replies to: Petroleum Engineering program at the University of Houston?

  • ShacklefordShackleford Posts: 609Registered User Member
    Oh. Wow. I did not know that. I'm currently working on a physics BS there. It's about time they add an undergrad for petroleum engineering.
  • toadstooltoadstool Posts: 1,145Registered User Senior Member
    Never buy a car in its first year of manufacture, and never sign up for the first year of a new college program. Let somebody else work out the bugs.
  • HoustonOilers27HoustonOilers27 Posts: 77Registered User Junior Member
    Yeah, it's starting sooner than I thought. There aren't really that many kinks to work out, because their masters program is amazing, and the professors know what the hell they're doing. So you should be good... But yeah, I would go with either ULL or LSU to be safe, but it's your choice...
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell Posts: 2,294User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    Never buy a car in its first year of manufacture, and never sign up for the first year of a new college program. Let somebody else work out the bugs.

    It's an offshoot of an existing department. There isn't a whole lot that can go wrong.
  • drill4itdrill4it Posts: 3Registered User New Member
    That was my thought. It has the established Masters program as a blueprint for success. Devon Energy and Marathon Oil have committed to making sizeable donations over the next few years. Im going there next week to check it out and talk with someone in the engineering department.
  • Forever LSUForever LSU Posts: 419Registered User Member
    Go to a school that has a long history of alumni in petroleum engineering. Not too many people know what the university of houston is outside of houston. Also, what has been previously mentioned, they are going to have some serious kinks to work out in a new program. Masters programs and BS programs are two totally different things. Don't assume that because the masters program is great, the BS program will be easy breezy.
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell Posts: 2,294User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    What do you people think will go wrong? There's an established graduate program curriculum, so the core courses should be already developed, there are already industry connections, and there's an existing alumni base. There's an established faculty because the program is a specialization in Chemical Engineering. There's established funding. The department is already ABET accredited.

    What could go wrong? The worst case is that they're short on electives for the first few years, in which case you just take other engineering courses that are related.

    As for UH - as I said in the other thread, if you can get into one of the Tier 1 programs, go there. But if you're stuck in a Tier 2, UH isn't the worst place to be, especially if it's in-state and cheap.
  • HoustonOilers27HoustonOilers27 Posts: 77Registered User Junior Member
    I seriously doubt it's a specialization of CheE... haha god save us all... Somewhere on the engineering's home page it talks about the curriculum. It's going to be a pretty decent PE program, but what I like is that the curriculum is highly involved in business, such as energy finance and law. Also, it encourages you to pick a specialization early, mentioning the reservoir engineer specialization. And who cares about tiers... Unless you go to UT then don't open your mouth, just because their HUGE alumni base. Besides UT and A&M for ugrad, you can't go wrong. And it evens out, those two departments have enormous washout rates, 'cuz so many ppl major in it there. So you will definitely not be getting individual attention. It brings the cliche, 'sink or swim,' into the playing field. Sorry, but that's not cool. And plus it seems UT and A&M are a bunch of elitists, who can't get their heads out of their ass... But what do I know...

    I would say UH would be perfect. If you want an internship; you've got it! Need I say more... You could possibly get a part time gig if you had good enough time management skills.

    ALSO, why does it matter if the UH name doesen't carry outside of Houston? Seriously man, Houston is where you want to be! It's the energy capital of the US. Why go anywhere else? lol OKC, Tulsa, or the middle of nowhere. come on now...
  • MontegutMontegut Posts: 5,917Registered User Senior Member
    I found that the University of Louisiana at Lafayette has a petroleum engineering program?

    Any input on that?
  • Forever LSUForever LSU Posts: 419Registered User Member
    Is the program ABET accredited, now that is the question. If it has the accreditation, then go for it, usually though, when a new engineering discipline starts up, it takes several years to get accreditation. I doubt it does.
  • toadstooltoadstool Posts: 1,145Registered User Senior Member
    ---- Is the program ABET accredited, now that is the question. If it has the accreditation, then go for it, usually though, when a new engineering discipline starts up, it takes several years to get accreditation. I doubt it does.----

    Forever LSU is correct. By definition an ABET accreditation formal visit ( the last step) will not happen until at least one year of students graduate from the program. ABET does not certify programs before they start. Information on Uof Houston UNDERGRAD abet cert if a bit fishy.
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell Posts: 2,294User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    It appears, right now, that the degree is being offered through the chemical engineering department. The BS chemical engineering program is ABET accredited.

    A number of large schools do exactly the same.
  • HoustonOilers27HoustonOilers27 Posts: 77Registered User Junior Member
    03-11-2009 06:06 PM
    Montegut I found that the University of Louisiana at Lafayette has a petroleum engineering program?

    Any input on that?

    Yes, ULL has an excellent program. It's right in the heart of the Gulf of Mexico, along with a renowned chair; you will have many connections.
  • Forever LSUForever LSU Posts: 419Registered User Member
    Yeah, it will take several years to that the kinks out of the program as I said before. Go to a program that is already established as a said before. And chemical engineering has nothing to do with petroleum engineering. Unless they offer a double major in both. That would be a nice option. Most schools do offer that option for students who have proven they can handle the course load. LSU does a double in chem/petrol, and a double in mech/petrol
  • Forever LSUForever LSU Posts: 419Registered User Member
    ULL's program is ABET accredited, but it tends to fall at the bottom of the petrol rankings. Once again, going to a program that is more established and has a larger alumni base will give you a little of an edge, espeically if it is one of the texas schools. The the top ten is as follows.
    U.S. News Rank University
    1 Texas A&M University–College Station
    2 University of Texas–Austin
    3 Stanford University (CA)
    4 Colorado School of Mines
    4 University of Oklahoma
    6 Louisiana State University–Baton Rouge
    7 University of Tulsa (OK)
    8 Texas Tech University
    9 Penn State University–University Park
    10 New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

    The first 3 always rotate around the number one spot. The others just fall out in succession. I would stay away from the last two just because they aren't in the right place. Colorado has a very strong program though, despite being located in colorado. But that school is in it's own league as far as I am concerned. You can't find a better place to learn geology than colorado.
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