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Electricity and Magnetism

KidNovelistKidNovelist Posts: 581Registered User Member
edited May 2009 in Engineering Majors
I heard this course is extremely hard. Any recommendations on how to study for it? What review books/extra materials do you use?
Post edited by KidNovelist on
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Replies to: Electricity and Magnetism

  • PurdueEEPurdueEE Posts: 705Registered User Member
    I found it to be extremely easy and it was probably the course I put the least amount of effort and thought into. I also had an excellent professor, so your mileage may vary.
  • jr1038jr1038 Posts: 109Registered User Junior Member
    I found it to be extremely easy and it was probably the course I put the least amount of effort and thought into

    uh, yeah, me too... (I'm assuming internet sarcasm)

    I'm assuming this is for a junior/senior-level course--if so, check out the E&M book by Griffiths if it's not the assigned text for your class, it's a good book to ease you into the subject. Prepare for a lot of math--I've heard it said that "it's the course where you actually learn vector calculus," and I'd agree. Practice problems are very important.
  • PurdueEEPurdueEE Posts: 705Registered User Member
    I am being 100% serious. It was a very easy course and everyone I knew got an A or B with minimal effort. Homework assignments would frequently take ~30 minutes per week.
  • norris212norris212 Posts: 456Registered User Member
    I guess you probably had an easy teacher. In my class there were only a couple A's in a class of about 25. Out of the first 3 physics classes, E and M is definitely the hardest. I would just recommend getting a solution manual to your book or look on cramster.com to check your answers or get the solutions.
  • gthopefulgthopeful Posts: 1,828Registered User Senior Member
    E&M is the most computationally difficult area in EE. Even the simplest cases may not even be analytically solvable, especially once you start talking about fields from simple antennas. However, most of the hard stuff isn't covered in an undergrad class and so the best way to study would be to simply brush up on your vector calculus and really learn what curl and divergence and whatnot mean.
  • DocTDocT Posts: 6,675Registered User Senior Member
    I find these responses extremely interesting!
  • ken285ken285 Posts: 3,882Registered User Senior Member
    My professor graded so that most people got C's, and only a handful got A's.
    DocT wrote:
    I find these responses extremely interesting!

    Why so? If I remember correctly, you teach a physics course to engineers?
  • vblickvblick Posts: 464Registered User Member
    It was one of the harder Cmpe engineering classes I took. At Georgia Tech it's known as Emag, Re-mag, and Three-mag (figure it out). I found microelectronic circuits to be more challenging though. Getting an A or B with minimal effort says a lot about your professor. You could pick up a book but chances are that your teacher isn't going to teach out of one. Just study for it once you're enrolled in the class.
  • PurdueEEPurdueEE Posts: 705Registered User Member
    The professor was absolutely excellent, probably the best (or at least amongst the best) I had at Purdue. You could tell he cared about teaching and put effort into it. My class was fortunate as I believe this professor does not teach the class very often and most people are stuck with not quite as good professors. Around graduation, a lot of us were reflecting back upon our time in school and many people said the class was one of their favorites and one where they learned the most.
  • DocTDocT Posts: 6,675Registered User Senior Member
    I teach engineering E&M to EE majors. When I read that students spend 30 minutes per week or less on E&M homework, I laugh.
  • PurdueEEPurdueEE Posts: 705Registered User Member
    We were not assigned very many problems. At most an assignment might take a little over one hour. One assignment took 10 minutes.
  • pervezpervez Posts: 295Registered User Junior Member
    DocT, don't mind me asking, but where do you teach? Only if you can answer...

    Curiosity :D
  • DocTDocT Posts: 6,675Registered User Senior Member
    If your problem sets take that little amount of time, your course must be extremely watered down.

    Besides the math which can present some difficulties for some students, I find that people (including me when I took the course more than 30 years ago), have difficulty understanding how to start solving the problem. Also the concept of a field is problematic for a lot of students. Most EE's consider the course the most difficult that they ever had to take as undergraduates.

    I'm not going to say where I teach but it is in CT.
  • pervezpervez Posts: 295Registered User Junior Member
    DOCT IS A YALEEEEEE MAN.


    Is this E&M referring to the equivalent AP course (AP Physics C E&M), or is it specific to EE?

    If so, I honestly thought the two PhysC AP tests were a breeze, looking forward to pummeling college physics. I might retake in college to get a better understanding.

    If not....DOCT IS A YALE MAN
  • DocTDocT Posts: 6,675Registered User Senior Member
    "Is this E&M referring to the equivalent AP course (AP Physics C E&M), or is it specific to EE?"

    No, its very different. First there is a significant difference between physics E & M and engineering E&M. Secondly, AP physics C is the same as calculus based freshman physics albeit somewhat watered down.

    My kid took that AP course and I don't remember seeing Maxwell's equations written in differential form. By the way, although CT is a small state, there are other schools besides Yale.
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