Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community polls, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

Engineering major with least amount of math?

racefamracefam Posts: 10Registered User New Member
edited October 2009 in Engineering Majors
I know, I know. Strange question. Bear with me - I'd love your opinions!
Thanks!
Post edited by racefam on
«1

Replies to: Engineering major with least amount of math?

  • ele902ele902 Posts: 274Registered User Junior Member
    I'm thinking environmental engineering....
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn Posts: 18,509Super Moderator Senior Member
    This question is asked all the time. Use the "Search this Thread" button. Type in "least amount of math." Down the page a little ways, you'll see a long thread on the subject.
  • alexithymiaalexithymia Posts: 182Registered User Junior Member
    I was under the impression that all engineering fields had to take the same amount of math; Calculus 1-3 and DIFEQ. Or maybe that's just my university.
  • static75static75 Posts: 904Registered User Member
    Civil engineering has less math than electrical and mechanical. B/c mechanical deals with dynamic structures, whereas civil deals with static. Electrical is very hardcore math because of digital logic too, etc.
  • fatpig554fatpig554 Posts: 432- Member
    I think probably civil, or bio? I don't really know.

    About EE: Actually I don't think there is much math in digital logic...anymore than say, in C programming. The most math-intensive branch of EE is signals (signal processing, wireless communication), maybe controls...the digital stuff is pretty easy.
  • static75static75 Posts: 904Registered User Member
    this is just what upperclassmen at my engineering college have told me. i could be wrong.
  • nshah9617nshah9617 Posts: 1,005Registered User Senior Member
    In terms of math classes, all engineering fields pretty much have the same amount and if not they are separated by 1-2 classes. Most engineers are required to take Calculus 1/2/3, Differential equations and maybe a Linear Algebra class.
  • aibarraibarr Posts: 4,248Registered User Senior Member
    Civil can have the least amount of math, but be careful. You'll end up taking the same number of mathematics prerequisites as everybody else, and if you end up interested in structural engineering and decide to subspecialize in that, then it's all over.

    And yes, this has been asked a million times, so if you search, you'll find all these opinions reiterated in some lengthy threads.
  • nshah9617nshah9617 Posts: 1,005Registered User Senior Member
    Also if you go to graduate school, all bets are pretty much off.
  • del_psidel_psi Posts: 229Registered User Junior Member
    "I was under the impression that all engineering fields had to take the same amount of math; Calculus 1-3 and DIFEQ. Or maybe that's just my university."

    Those are just prereqs. The actual engineering classes cover even more math. In my signals and systems class we are talking about convolution integrals and a couple of weeks we are going to start talking about fourier transforms. In my circuits class I'm using the results obtained from complex analysis to solve problems in the frequency domain.

    Based on what I've seen , civil or environmental engineering have the least math at the undergraduate level.
  • aibarraibarr Posts: 4,248Registered User Senior Member
    In my signals and systems class we are talking about convolution integrals and a couple of weeks we are going to start talking about fourier transforms. In my circuits class I'm using the results obtained from complex analysis to solve problems in the frequency domain.

    Helloooooo seismic analysis!
    Based on what I've seen , civil or environmental engineering have the least math at the undergraduate level.

    Helloooooo seismic analysis!
    Also if you go to graduate school, all bets are pretty much off.

    Not to get too repetitive, but guess what my civil engineering masters thesis was on.
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn Posts: 18,509Super Moderator Senior Member
    Seismic analysis? Was it in Texas? I was dumb and didn't take a class in seismic, because I figured I would be designing in TEXAS. Ha, the joke was on me when I ended up in Maine! Oh, well. (Instead, I took prestressed concrete, which isn't used much up here.)
  • eclecticisteclecticist Posts: 221Registered User Junior Member
    If you ask this kind of question, then you probably shouldn't be thinking about studying engineering...
  • aibarraibarr Posts: 4,248Registered User Senior Member
    Seismic analysis? Was it in Texas?

    Well, I took dynamics in Texas with the mechEs, so that covered the basics. Then most of my grad work was in seismic analysis, design, and retrofit... In Illinois. (The New Madrid Seismic Zone generates a lot of interest up there, so it's not as completely random as it seems.) Moved out to California for a year where I did nothing *but* nonlin seismic analysis, then back to Texas to actually design stuff. =)
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn Posts: 18,509Super Moderator Senior Member
    Yeah, people are always surprised when I tell them about New Madrid!

    DH got his civil license in CA, but hasn't gotten his structural there yet. He probably won't unless a hospital or tall building comes up. You don't need a structural license for a lot of stuff there, fortunately. He's a bright guy, but after his oral exam for the civil license, the examiners told him he needs to do a lot more studying to have any hope of passing the structural exam.
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.