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why is industrial engineering considered easy compared to other engineering fields?

biggumtbiggumt Posts: 41Registered User Junior Member
edited January 2010 in Engineering Majors
??? Does it make it less in demand? I don't get why people take a shot at it, how does it matter? the pay is similar, there is actually a lot of opportunity and growth 20 percent from 2006-2016 according to BLS. but anyways can someone elaborate more about why it is "easier"?
Post edited by biggumt on
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Replies to: why is industrial engineering considered easy compared to other engineering fields?

  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell Posts: 2,294User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    anyone that thinks IE is easy needs to sit in on a stochastic optimization class.
  • purduefrankpurduefrank Posts: 485Registered User Member
    More or less I think that it's because there are a number of IE classes that aren't extremely technical. However, I have yet to meet anybody who says they've taken an easy linear programming or stoch methods class.
  • JapherJapher Posts: 1,350Registered User Senior Member
    because if purduefrank can do it anyone can ;)
  • aibarraibarr Posts: 4,248Registered User Senior Member
    Also, because of all the ice cream.
  • silence_kitsilence_kit Posts: 1,826Registered User Senior Member
    i don't know, maybe because the program is designed to be less demanding on the student?

    (i don't actually know if this is true or not)

    it is true that certain programs ask more from their students than others. To deny it (ice cream anyone?) is a serious act of wishful thinking. it doesn't really make for polite conversation though . . . also a program being more difficult doesn't necessarily make it more worthwhile.
  • cyclone10cyclone10 Posts: 400Registered User Member
    the curriculum in IE is composed of general engineering + business/management; so it is 'softer'.
    at my school they go by the name 'imaginary engineers'...but it's all good fun
  • biggumtbiggumt Posts: 41Registered User Junior Member
    according to BLS there are about 201,000 industrial engineers in America. DO all of them have industrial engineering degrees? Because I met a lot of engineers but have yet to meet an industrial engineer. Can an electrical or mechanical engineer essentially become an industrial engineer as well? Because I heard there are few schools that offer an industrial engineering degree. I think I read somewhere here that it was 23 schools that offered it. The numbers just don't seem to be right.
  • purduefrankpurduefrank Posts: 485Registered User Member
    because if purduefrank can do it anyone can

    yessir..

    One word: un-elite
    His uncle: doesn't make more money than you
    His SAT: lower than yours
    His major: easier than yours

    How does he do it all you ask? Strategically, like a consultant lurking in the background...
  • cyclone10cyclone10 Posts: 400Registered User Member
    There should be more than 23 schools... Small Privates and Publics also offer IE undergrad. In the state of Iowa I can say there are around 10 universities that offer IE but only 2 that offer other fields like EE, Mech E Civil etc...
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell Posts: 2,294User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    the curriculum in IE is composed of general engineering + business/management

    You see a huge variation between programs. Some IE programs are designed to be Operations Management (business) with calculus. Other IE programs are designed to be hard-core CS/Math hybrids. And some really aren't engineering (ergonomics, anyone?).

    A chemical engineer is a chemical engineer regardless of what school he went to; the quality of the programs and level of rigor are different, but the basic ideas covered are the same. Industrial engineering is not the same way. When someone tells you she's an IE, you immediately ask what school she attended, not to be pretentious, but to get an idea what sort of industrial engineer she is.

    But my point still stands - anyone that thinks IE is easier can sit in a stochastic optimization program. I've got graduate degrees from top universities in "real" engineering fields, and Stochastic Optimization is 5 times more difficult than anything I've seen at any level (including PhD chemical engineering).
  • purduefrankpurduefrank Posts: 485Registered User Member
    GP

    I'm curious as to what you think about Purdue's IE program? Ergonomics has crept its way into our curriculum despite my lack of enthusiasm..
  • JapherJapher Posts: 1,350Registered User Senior Member
    How does he do it all you ask? Strategically, like a consultant lurking in the background...


    verrry sneaky
  • G.P.BurdellG.P.Burdell Posts: 2,294User Awaiting Email Confirmation Senior Member
    I'm curious as to what you think about Purdue's IE program?

    Production and Manufacturing with some emphasis OR and Statistics. There's not a whole lot of supply chain or econometrics, from what I've seen. Overall I hear it's an excellent program.
    Ergonomics has crept its way into our curriculum despite my lack of enthusiasm..

    I know why IE's get stuck with ergonomics, but ergonomics is not something an IE should be doing, and it's not engineering. Most people (and companies) do not realize that there's an entire field called Industrial Hygiene that studies (among other things) ergonomics. If you want to someone to tell you how high a chair should be, go hire one of those graduates.
  • Bilind2007Bilind2007 Posts: 13Registered User New Member
    Industrial Engineering is basically an Applied Mathematics degree. Anyone who says it's easy does not know what their talking about. It may be one of the hardest engineering fields out there.
  • BowlesmanBowlesman Posts: 32Registered User New Member
    why is poli sci a joke compared to electrical engineering?
    haha im kidding... IEOR isn't that easy.
    but IEOR prolly have maybe 3 optimization/LP classes.... whearas for EE every class is math intensive. EEs have to try in every class. if an IEORer gets 3 Cs in the classes mentioned above, he could still bring it up by taking "engineering" classes in human behavior, workforce leadership/mgmt, product advertising design, etc.
    but it's skewed bc ppl are biased when they know admissions rates. it's kind of like saying MIT is much harder than Caltech because the admissions rate is 10 vs 16. (chances are you won't be sleeping/raging a lot at either place)
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