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What can I do with a Biomedical Engineering B.S degree?

John117John117 Posts: 791- Member
edited January 9 in Engineering Majors
Title says it all. Also, how would you think about a M.S in Computer engineering after a B.S in Biomed engineering?
Post edited by John117 on
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Replies to: What can I do with a Biomedical Engineering B.S degree?

  • cyclone10cyclone10 Posts: 400Registered User Member
    you could get a B.S. in EE/CompE/ME etc... to M.S. in Biomed but not the other way around. Biomed curriculum is too weak
  • CSmajor5CSmajor5 Posts: 131Registered User Junior Member
    Biomedical engineer is little bit of everything and outcome of nothing with just B.S. . You can't do M.S. computer engineering with biomedical engineering because you have enough exposure to circuit, machine level coding, vlsi, and definitely no knowledge of transistor.

    Just apply to med / law school and see if you can get in unless you wanna redo your B.S. to go in computer engineer. Feel sorry for you. Btw what school did you do biomedical engineer?
  • cyclone10cyclone10 Posts: 400Registered User Member
    as I understand it the OP has not actually began undergrad studies?

    I think BME meshes real well for people that ultimately want to go to med school but still want a major that one: isn't a joke, two: will actually give them a good job if they should decide not to decide to pursue med school and three: not ruin their undergrad GPA if they should decide to go to med school...for these purposes BME meshes nicely otherwise i would consider a more standard degree such as ME or EE and then working or doing research in Biomed field amongst many other options
  • CSmajor5CSmajor5 Posts: 131Registered User Junior Member
    1) yeah its joke. You won't get a job related to biomedical industry unless you have least master. You learn few ME and EE in biomedical and call it a degree along with medical school prerequiste classes.
    2) if they pursue medical school and that's if.
    3) your gpa is important factor when you apply to medical school. Most student in georgia tech decide to go into industrial engineer and do medical school prerequisite courses since industrial engineer is joke.
  • thevidrohithevidrohi Posts: 73Registered User Junior Member
    1) yeah its joke. You won't get a job related to biomedical industry unless you have least master. You learn few ME and EE in biomedical and call it a degree along with medical school prerequiste classes.
    2) if they pursue medical school and that's if.
    3) your gpa is important factor when you apply to medical school. Most student in georgia tech decide to go into industrial engineer and do medical school prerequisite courses since industrial engineer is joke.

    Wait, what? I don't know what BioE/BME is like at all institutions, but at high-tier schools like Hopkins, Duke, Rice, etc., Bioengineering is one of (if not the) most rigorous majors offered. Sure, you may have to do a bit more legwork to find a traditional engineering job (after all, it's a new field, and many employers share the misconceptions quoted above), but plenty of BioEs that I know go on to work for Medtronic, Merck, National Instruments, etc.
  • CSmajor5CSmajor5 Posts: 131Registered User Junior Member
    a know a guy who graduate from Georgia Tech with biomedical engineer with just B.S. and had 3.5 GPA top 10%. He couldn't find the job related to biomedical engineer. The recruiter for Medtronic, Merck, National Instrument relate to Biomedical equipment will recruit people with least master in EE or BME relate to biomedical engineer. If someone gets the job with just B.S. would be consulting company with MBA to back up his Biomedical degree. In the career site for Gatech, qualification for Medtronic was MS degree and up. Trust me, with just B.S. degree, you won't go far in Biomedical Engineer area.
  • jfacjfac Posts: 115Registered User Junior Member
    Also you can do many biomedical eng. jobs with a degree in chemical engineering...

    right?
  • bmedudebmedude Posts: 13Registered User New Member
    How about a BioMed with minor / concentration in EE ? Does that open up EE gate for grad school wider ?
  • The LegendThe Legend Posts: 912Registered User Member
    You can get good jobs with M.S right? Maybe combine with EE or something.
  • concerned123concerned123 Posts: 322Registered User Member
    Absolutely false that you can't do anything with it and need a masters to find a job. I know someone who graduated from a top 10 college a few years ago w/a degree in biomed engineering - landed a great job w/a very well-known company and is now making 100k a year - not bad for a 25 year old. Very bright kid, very good school -now in grad school part-time.
  • TheMan777TheMan777 Posts: 685Registered User Member
    Yea - I am in BME right now as an undergrad. It is definitely not a joke - it is one of the most rigorous paths at my school. You cannot combine "engineering" and "joke" together - EVER. Its kind of silly that people make threads to bash other engineering majors and telling them that they cannot find jobs, when there are plenty of other degrees that will not net you as many job options besides teaching.

    Saying a B.S. in BME is useless just isn't true and saying that you won't find jobs with a B.S. in BME is also flat out wrong. There are people in the world getting jobs without degrees and plenty more who are getting by with an associates. It is a very new field - yes - so there are many many skeptics. And yes - it is not as diverse as getting a EE or ME degree. But that is far from saying that it is useless. It is still a growing field and current times cannot predict how the future will be...

    And you can definitely do a masters in computer engineering if you want to. Its possible, but difficult. I can agree that the BME doesn't plan you as well for a Computer Engineering degree as a EE or ME - but in general you still have some skills in programming, electronics, electric circuit theory... etc.
  • jadawsonjadawson Posts: 4Registered User New Member
    <= Graduated from USC with a B.S. Biomedical Engineering last year and regret it.

    I've applied to every biomed job from quality engineering, to research assistants, lab technician, and systems engineering. 500+ resumes sent no luck. Rejected from med school last year, rejected from GRAD SCHOOL for a M.S. BME two years in a row.

    I'm definitely not the MBA business type (not quite a business-savvy personality) and am not the debate-oriented lawyer type neither.


    Wasted time and money at a private university on a useless degree i'm better off pursuing a paramedic program at a trade school than competing for jobs with this year's graduating class.

    DO NOT CHOOSE THIS MAJOR, WHATEVER YOU DO!
  • dzhou92dzhou92 Posts: 29Registered User New Member
    Jadawson, was there something that you did to reject you for grad school? No offense, but seeing as I'm hoping to pursue this major, I'd hope not to get stuck later on in life :\

    For those who have already studied BME, is it better to go into a more math/physics-based school or a chemistry based school for BME?
  • DeucesDeuces Posts: 1,501Registered User Senior Member
    don't look at it as math/physics based vs. chemistry based.

    Look to see what schools specialize in and use their course offerings to figure that out.

    For example, @ UCLA there's plenty of work being done in cell+tissue engineering/biomaterials, microfluidic devices, and the study of drug release mechanisms (+ materials with controlled drug release). I remember Cornell having an optical focus, see what you're interesting


    Although, I think BME at the undergrad level is weak on the MechE/EE skills that I would've liked to have had. My undergraduate program (UCLA) sends 1/3rd to med school, 1/3rd to graduate school and another third to industry/other misc. I'm in the misc. category (looking at CS & consulting, finding my way to product manager/program manager roles in high tech)
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn Posts: 17,335Super Moderator Senior Member
    Deuces, that's what U. Texas told my son for distribution - 1/3, 1/3, 1/3. That's what appealed to him, since he has no clue at 17 as to what he wants to do. Good luck to you!
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