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will i be able to survive engineering?

brahskibrahski Posts: 56Registered User Junior Member
edited July 2010 in Engineering Majors
I'm decent at math, I would say in the B range. Is engineering impossible for me? Or does the effort and time I put into it dictate my success in engineering coursework?
Post edited by brahski on
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Replies to: will i be able to survive engineering?

  • hasuchObehasuchObe Posts: 201Registered User Junior Member
    not only effort and time but how you go about asking questions and organizing what you have learned.
  • brahskibrahski Posts: 56Registered User Junior Member
    can you clarify a bit more, and you really didn't answer my question.
  • GLOBALTRAVELERGLOBALTRAVELER Posts: 2,845Registered User Senior Member
    It's not being decent at math but are you good at the APPLICATION of math to solve problems. Can you use the application of math for use in your physics or chemistry courses.

    Just being good at math won't cut it because is you are good at math and s-u-c-k at Physics then you won't succeed. That goes for other engineering courses like computer science, statics, statistics, etc.
  • brahskibrahski Posts: 56Registered User Junior Member
    idk really, I know that If I try I can do it.

    I haven't taken physics since high school, when I took it I did pretty good in it. Never took AP physics either.

    seems like you guys are just being discouraging.
  • GLOBALTRAVELERGLOBALTRAVELER Posts: 2,845Registered User Senior Member
    Engineering is one of those disciplines where you have to give it a try and see. I cannot say I am an undergrad engineering expert because technically I did not major in engineering as an undergrad (I did in grad school). I was a math/cs major and if you cannot apply the math concepts, engineering will eat you up.

    The good thing about engineering is even if you try for the first two years and change majors, you would have already went through more challenges academically and would be prepared for other majors.
  • brahskibrahski Posts: 56Registered User Junior Member
    eh w/e you still haven't answered my question.

    all I know is that if I focus and dedicate most of my time to it, I'll understand it. Idk if I can apply math to solve problems yet. I know that I'm decent at math. I'm going to go for it and succeed.
  • GLOBALTRAVELERGLOBALTRAVELER Posts: 2,845Registered User Senior Member
    To answer your question(s)...

    1) Yes, engineering is possible for you.
    2) Yes, the effort and time I put into it dictate my success in engineering coursework.
  • AndrewskyAndrewsky Posts: 172Registered User Junior Member
    I think this is why some schools have 3+2 programs. After 3 years you get a Bachelors degree and after another 2 you get an engineering degree. If you're not cut out for engineering you at least have something to fall back on.
  • alchemist007alchemist007 Posts: 419Registered User Member
    You will do fine. I was not a good math student in high school and I did terribly in high school physics. But once I got to college all it took was dedication and I have gotten through calculus 1 and calc 2 3 , physics 1 2. With As and Bs. You just need to be devoted to becoming an engineer. Nothing is impossible. Hardwork pays off!
  • EnginoxEnginox Posts: 828Registered User Member
    Will you be able to survive engineering? No idea. But you can prepare yourself now in order to increase your chances of survival. The mathematics you will find in an undergraduate science and engineering program will be mostly intuitive and application-based; in other words, it will be used to mathematically represent the physical world as accurately as possible but it will never be 100% exact/accurate. It will not be as rigorous as the kind of mathematics studied by pure mathematicians, who are mostly concerned with inflexible accuracy.

    What you can do now is review your algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Focus on developing your intuition and problem-solving skills. At the same time, make sure you understand the fundamental concepts of algebra. Developing a study plan, challenge yourself, and focus on things you can control now. You want to gain the ability to use the mathematics you learn to solve problems in the physical world. Go and prepare yourself, good buddy. Now.
  • alchemist007alchemist007 Posts: 419Registered User Member
    The Future is Now™
  • Experiment8Experiment8 Posts: 262Registered User Junior Member
    all I know is that if I focus and dedicate most of my time to it, I'll understand it.
    it'll probably be the same in your engineering courses then
  • Aggie10Aggie10 Posts: 60Registered User Junior Member
    No. You will not survive. You will die.
  • brahskibrahski Posts: 56Registered User Junior Member
    your mother will die
  • brahskibrahski Posts: 56Registered User Junior Member
    enginox thanks for the great advice.

    what are some good self teaching books to build my math skills? i already have taken calc 1 and got a B in it.

    and I might also pick up a self help book on physics as well.
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