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Harvard Program Fails Federal Gainful Employment Test, Pauses Admissions

Roger_DooleyRoger_Dooley Founder Posts: 106,392 Senior Member
Federal sanctions aren't just for predatory for-profits any more... The Harvard A.R.T. Institute (not to be confused with the plethora of Art Institute for-profit offerings in culinary arts, etc.) made the list of schools where the loan amounts don't lead to appropriate salaries. From the NYTimes:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/13/upshot/harvard-too-obamas-final-push-to-catch-predatory-colleges-is-revealing.html

The A.R.T. program has been selective, admitting only 24 students a year into a graduate program for "acting, dramaturgy or voice pedagogy." The average graduate of the program borrows $78,000 and earns a mere $36,000 per year. Harvard is pausing admissions to the program for this year.

This raises an interesting question... I am sure the experience is great and that the graduates are talented. I'm equally sure nobody would want to deny these students the right to spend a bunch of money to pursue their dream and work in a field they love. Even those who don't achieve stardom may make great artistic contributions and enjoy their work tremendously. Not everybody wants to work for Goldman Sachs or Google, nor should they. BUT, should the taxpayers support these students and incur a high risk of non-payment? And, even more important, should anyone be discouraging young people from assuming what will become a crushing debt burden?

A couple of more data points would be helpful, notably the longer term loan performance. Are there many defaults? How many are paid back early? Is family income a factor, i.e., could some grads from this program knowingly pursue a lower income career because their spouse/partner's income would allow both repayment and a reasonable lifestyle? Or, are young people signing off on big debt without a realistic picture of what their prospects are? Even if they don't default, will they spend a decade or more struggling to make ends meet?

Personally, I'd distinguish between a program like Harvard's and an online "computer science" degree that racks up the same kind of loans with little or no career benefit. But, non-profit colleges can definitely fail the gainful employment test. Here's a link to several versions of the list, which includes programs at George Washington University, the University of Florida, and other well-known non-profits:
https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/about/data-center/school/ge
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Replies to: Harvard Program Fails Federal Gainful Employment Test, Pauses Admissions

  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 61,505 Senior Member
    Yale masters in music performance are also fully funded.

    But really...LOTS of grad schools in the arts are NOT fully funded for all. They just aren't.

  • ZinheadZinhead Registered User Posts: 2,366 Senior Member
    Personally, I'd distinguish between a program like Harvard's and an online "computer science" degree that racks up the same kind of loans with little or no career benefit. But, non-profit colleges can definitely fail the gainful employment test. Here's a link to several versions of the list, which includes programs at George Washington University, the University of Florida, and other well-known non-profits:
    https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/about/data-center/school/ge

    What a bogus list. There are numerous majors with expected income levels in the $100,00 to $200,000+ range that are considered to have "little of no career benefit".

    This list in its current form provides little or no benefit.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 61,505 Senior Member
    The amount of forgiveness is $165,000

    And if this amount is forgiven...the student will pay taxes on it. But that's after 20 years of making the minimum payments ON TIME every month.
  • AlbionGirlAlbionGirl Registered User Posts: 773 Member
    I once saw someone encourage an aspiring social worker to go to a fancy private school she'd gotten admitted to - that cost $60,000 a year - because she could just borrow the money, pay 10% of her discretionary income, then pay for 10 years and get the money forgiven.

    This might end up being a serious mistake. Some people who thought they were in this program are having the rules changed on them retrospectively.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/20/your-money/student-loans/they-thought-they-qualified-for-loan-forgiveness-years-later-the-answer-is-no.html
  • calmomcalmom Registered User Posts: 18,400 Senior Member
    where students encourage other students to borrow large amounts of money because they can simply pay a little in income-based repayment every month and discharge it in public service loan forgiveness
    It's not just students - it is the schools as well. Schools offering MPA's or other degrees geared to government or public service encourage borrowing based on the IBR and loan forgiveness options. For example, see this presentation from NYU Wagner School of Public Service: https://wagner.nyu.edu/files/admissions/FPSLF_Program_Webinar_Slide_Deck.pdf

    I don't think it's a bad thing for taxpayers to support graduate education that leads to public service -- but I think that direct funding in the form of grants tied to the student's commitment to work a certain number of years in specified types of jobs makes more sense.
  • kelsmomkelsmom Super Moderator Posts: 14,234 Super Moderator
    edited January 17
    With PSLF, the amount forgiven is tax-free, which makes it a draw for some. This is the first year any borrowers are eligible for PSLF, and very few have actually qualified. There are a lot of caveats with PSLF ... only on-time payments count, only work at qualifying employers that is properly certified counts, 30 or more hours/week must be certified to count, payments made while in paid-ahead status don't count, etc., etc. I always caution my students that they may not qualify, the program may be modified or discontinued, etc.

    I believe that if IBR and PSLF are in place for some, they need to be in place for all. Who is going to determine what degree/program/school/tuition cut-off/etc. is "fair?" In other words, whose value judgment should count?
  • compmomcompmom Registered User Posts: 7,730 Senior Member
    What about grad programs in the arts at public universities? They are not for-profit. Are they considered non-profits?

    It looks like Harvard simply has to change the certificate program label to an actual master's degree and problem would be solved.
  • insanedreamerinsanedreamer Registered User Posts: 1,536 Senior Member
    Harvard can easily afford to give enough aid so those students don't have to take out loans, or at least not as much. Not sure why taxpayers should bear the risk of debt default when Harvard is sitting on billions.
  • musicmeritmusicmerit Registered User Posts: 1,060 Senior Member
    @thumper1 Yale School of Music is only fully funded because of a donation. You are right, most programs are not.

    "The Adams also contributed a gift in 2005, making Yale School of Music a tuition-free professional institution."
    http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2017/01/17/adams-center-for-musical-arts-opens/
  • kelsmomkelsmom Super Moderator Posts: 14,234 Super Moderator
    Yes, grad programs at public (and private) universities are at non-profit schools. It's not just the school designation - it's the program's curriculum that matters. If it's a certificate program, it falls under gainful employment rules. I suspect the programs at Harvard do not fit the definition of a master's program (there are standards, even in the arts). That is why they are certificate, and not master's, programs.
  • Roger_DooleyRoger_Dooley Founder Posts: 106,392 Senior Member
    Good points, @juillet. The forgiveness program is interesting, but would seem to carry a fair amount of risk, including tying the individual to limited employment options they may end up not liking. And, if the requirements are loosened, it could become another boondoggle in which taxpayers transfer money to high-tuition schools. I agree, too, about the family income bit... I was envisioning a scenario where the individual chooses lower-paying positions but could readily earn a higher income if personal circumstances demanded it. (E.g., a grad who chooses a part-time teaching position or opts to pursue random performance gigs because they don't have to worry about paying the rent/mortgage.) But, if the person is already near the max for their field, there's a definite risk of financial pain if the partner's high income goes away for any reason.

    I wonder how many respected music (or other arts) programs would fare if evaluated this way...
  • JenJenJenJenJenJenJenJen Registered User Posts: 671 Member
    I have an issue with the cut-and-dried nature of this article. Yes, people headed to Wall Street after grad school are going to be raking it in, financially -- good for them! -- but the business majors I met in college didn't LOVE financial firm careers, per se, instead they valued financially successful careers and the lifestyles that go with them. And those predatory for-profit and (particularily) "accredited online degrees" often take advantage of veterans and Americans down on their luck. Absolutely.

    But, what about those who value doing good and making the world a better place? Social work will never, ever pay Goldman Sachs money. The social workers I know have passion, though, for helping others. There is value in that. That's important.

    Similarly, art is important. There are the superstars who who to colleges and major in drama etc (Jodi Foster went to Yale) but there are plenty of artists, writers, stage actors and more who love what they do and can't imagine having a job which isn't creative. These people, these community theater stage directors, these local art show mounters, they a make OUR lives more interesting. We should see the value in those that put art out into our worlds as well.

    Future financial success is not the only measure of school outcome.
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