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Need Help!!

SterlingboySterlingboy Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
Hey guys, I am currently attending UC Riverside as a Sophomore. I completed my high school in India and came here for my UGs. I am a citizen of USA but I am not a reaident of any state as my parents went back to India after I was born.
Now, I was told that I will be paying in state tuition after I become a reaident of California but UCR is still charging me for out of state. It says that I have to prove that I make the amount of out-of-state tuiton plus my expenses on my own. Thats the only way they will make me instate. That amounts to **** 70,000/year! Not even college graduates make that much! It such ****!
I really need your help, if anyone is going through a similar situation or anyone who has a solution to this, please share or else I won't be able to afford UCR
Post edited by Chedva on

Replies to: Need Help!!

  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri Registered User Posts: 5,691 Senior Member
    Students who go to CA for the purpose of attending college are classified as OOS students and will be charged OOS rates all 4 years with few exceptions. Who told you that you could be considered in state for tuition purposes? @auntbea may have some insight on the details. I don't believe you'll be able to get reclassified.

    How much can your parents afford to pay each year?
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 62,678 Senior Member
    You needed to establish your residency before starting college. Your parents do NOT let live in CA.

    In can't imagine how you thought you would be instate for tuition purposes.

    How have you been paying for your first two years of college?

    Where did you graduate from high school?

  • GumbymomGumbymom Registered User Posts: 18,429 Senior Member
    Living in the state alone does not make you eligible for in-state tuition. You have to establish yourself as an independent student or have you parents move back to CA.

    Undergraduates: If you’re a nonresident undergraduate student with nonresident parents, obtaining California residency for the purposes of tuition is extremely difficult (this includes transfer students from community colleges and other postsecondary institutions within California). Virtually all nonresident undergraduates with nonresident parents remain nonresidents for the duration of their undergraduate career at UC.

    Establishing physical presence and intent

    To meet these requirements, you must be continuously physically present in California for more than one year (366 days) immediately prior to the residence determination date (generally the first day of classes) and intend to make California your home permanently. You can demonstrate your intention to stay in California by relinquishing legal ties to your former state and establishing legal ties to California.

    Here are some ways you can establish intent:

    Remain in California when school is not in session.
    Register to vote and vote in California elections.
    Designate your California address as permanent on all school and employment records, including current military records.
    Obtain a California driver's license within 10 days of settling in California. (If you've never had a driver’s license in any state, then obtain a California identification card.)
    If you have a car, obtain a California motor vehicle registration within 20 days of settling in California.
    Work in California and file California resident income tax forms from the date of entry into the state. Income earned outside of California after that date must also be declared in California.
    Establish and maintain active bank accounts in California banks and close out-of-state accounts.
    Surrender all out-of-state identification (including driver's license).
    Establish a permanent home where your belongings are kept.
    Obtain a license for professional practice in California.
    You’ll need to relinquish out-of-state ties and demonstrate intent while simultaneously meeting the physical presence requirement.

    Absences from California

    In order to demonstrate intent, it is important to stay in California during nonacademic periods. If you’re a nonresident student who is in the process of establishing California residency, and you leave California for more than one month during the summer before the term in which you are establishing resident status, your intent will be questioned.

    Graduate and law students who must leave for nonacademic-related reasons for more than a month during the summer should contact the campus residence deputy to seek advice prior to leaving and filing for classification.

    Financial independence

    Nonresident undergraduates

    This requirement makes it extremely difficult for most undergraduates who are not financially dependent on a California-resident parent to qualify for classification as a California resident.

    If you’re an unmarried undergraduate under the age of 24 and your parent(s) are not California residents, you must be able to document (for example, using tax returns, W-2 forms, bank statements) that you have been totally self-sufficient for two full years prior to the residence determination date, supporting yourself, for example, through jobs, financial aid, commercial/institutional loans in your name only, and documentable savings from your earnings. This also means you can't have been claimed as an income tax dependent by any individual or have accepted gifts (cash or other support) that contributed to your subsistence for two tax years immediately preceding the term.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Registered User Posts: 82,278 Senior Member
    <<<
    Now, I was told that I will be paying in state tuition after I become a reaident of California
    <<<


    Who told you that?? If it was someone from UCR, then you should have gotten that in writing.

    >>>
    but UCR is still charging me for out of state.
    >>>

    As they should because your parents do NOT pay taxes there. Why should you get instate rates when your parents aren't Calif taxpayers??

    >>It says that I have to prove that I make the amount of out-of-state tuiton plus my expenses on my own. Thats the only way they will make me instate. That amounts to **** 70,000/year! Not even college graduates make that much! It such ****!
    <<

    Right.

    Why should you be considered to be independent of your parents when your parents are supporting you????
  • aunt beaaunt bea Registered User Posts: 8,052 Senior Member
    edited March 21
    It says that I have to prove that I make the amount of out-of-state tuition plus my expenses on my own.

    Yes, that is correct.
    You have to demonstrate that you are earning your expenses, on your own, without help from anyone and then, pay California taxes by filing a California Tax form 540 to pay California taxes. That means you need proof from a California employer, with legal documentation, that you are employed and that your earned income is shown on a W-2 Form and covers your OOS fees, your rent, your transportation, your utilities. It has to match your federal 1040 form.

    I don't know of too many students who can earn $70K per year, while going to school, without a degree.

    You were supposed to work for two years, prior to attending the university, begin your Residency determination date and start your budget sheet at that time. The budget sheets show your rent, food, utilities, transportation, health insurance and other miscellaneous costs and then include the cost of the university. The W2 and your taxes have to match your budget.

    Because that wasn't done, and your parents currently don't reside in California, the residency committee determined that you came to California for educational purposes, which means 4 years of full fees.

    The only students. who typically get in-state residency are students whose parents moved to California for a job change.

    California long-term residents pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in state taxes, so the children of those taxpayers pay in-state rates. OOS residents, regardless of being citizens, haven't paid into the state for those schools, so you pay an OOS rate. It is fair.
  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri Registered User Posts: 5,691 Senior Member
    There are a lot of US colleges that cost less than $70k/year. The SUNYs are ~$30k. Midwest colleges are probably less expensive than that. Private LACs can be a good option too. How much can your parents pay per year without borrowing?
  • SterlingboySterlingboy Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
    I was able to pay my first year tuition with savings and that wiped out all of it. They can pay about 10,000/ year at maximum.

    I appricaite your reply.
  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri Registered User Posts: 5,691 Senior Member
    edited March 21
    Okay, $10k/year is a start. If you file the FAFSA, as a junior and senior you can take the federal student loan ($7500/year). That gives you ~$17k to work with. Do you have any family in the US? If you could work over the summer you could probably raise ~$3k. Does the $10k include travel expenses and insurance? What's your major?

    Check through this list of low cost US universities. Make sure any you consider are nonprofit schools. Public universities are good. Go to the website of any college you're interested in to confirm their costs for an out of state student. Let us know which ones seem interesting. We may be able to offer some insight
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 10,872 Senior Member
    edited March 21
    Now, I was told that I will be paying in state tuition after I become a reaident of California

    Who told you that? The problem is you cannot become a resident of CA as a student.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 62,678 Senior Member
    If you want to stay at your current school...$17,000 is not going to cover the costs.

    Would you be willing to go elsewhere?
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 30,550 Senior Member
    edited March 21
    How much can your parents afford?
    You need to find an affordable college quickly because roughly in a week transfer admissions will be over and you'll be stuck.
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