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Should I Pursue Need-Based Aid if FAFSA is High?

liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
Hello, my parents filed FAFSA early and our EFC looks to 50,000+ (which is accurate, considering my household makes almost 200k). On CommonApp, should I say that I want to pursue need-based aid even if FAFSA is above the tuition costs at the schools I am applying to? On FAFSA, we could send the results to up to ten colleges, so we did, but should we not even apply for need-based aid if we won't get anything? Or is there the slightest chance that we will? If it helps, some of the colleges I am applying to include Ohio State, Case Western, and University of Michigan.
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Replies to: Should I Pursue Need-Based Aid if FAFSA is High?

  • Erin's DadErin's Dad Super Moderator Posts: 34,279 Super Moderator
    Don't bother. You won't get any except for a student loan which you can get regardless of your answer. Certainly look at schools where you qualify for some merit aid.
  • liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    When I look at Case Western's website, apparently the tuition plus fees is around 60,000. Does this mean that I would get 10,000 financial aid if my FAFSA is 50,000? Or does FAFSA only represent tuition costs?
  • AroundHereAroundHere Registered User Posts: 2,227 Senior Member
    1. Case Western uses the Profile, which usually results in a higher EFC than FAFSA
    2. Financial aid isn't necessarily free money. Run the net price calculator on the Case website to get an idea of how they balance grants, work study, and loans in a package
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Registered User Posts: 82,433 Senior Member
    You might get a loan
    Case doesn't meet need
    Run the npc
  • billcshobillcsho Registered User Posts: 16,498 Senior Member
    More important. Talk to your parents and see how much they can afford. Many family cannot even provide the EFC.
  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri Registered User Posts: 5,750 Senior Member
    When I look at Case Western's website, apparently the tuition plus fees is around 60,000. Does this mean that I would get 10,000 financial aid if my FAFSA is 50,000? Or does FAFSA only represent tuition costs?

    None of the above. The EFC that's generated when you file the FAFSA only tells if you qualify for a federal Pell grant of up to ~$5k/year or not. The EFC cut off to qualify is about 5,000, so you won't qualify for one.

    To get an estimate of what a school might cost, run their Net Price Calculator. With a $200k income, you're probably going to have to look for schools that offer merit for your stats unless your parents can afford to be full pay. How much will they pay per year?
  • liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    Okay thank you all. My parents have their own retirement to worry about so I have to pay for most of college on my own, (they may pay 20,000 a year) which I am okay with. I think I may able to get merit through Ohio State. My stats are ok: 1550 sat, top 3% in my school, high GPA, ECs of #1 tennis singles player, 4 year varsity tennis and XC, oboe player, summer job, Perry Initiative Program, etc. but no hooks. If my goal is to get free tuition at a school, is aiming for Ohio State or Case Western too high to consider merit?
    I am also considering UPitt.
  • liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    Also, since my EFC is so high, should I not even bother applying for financial aid at the schools I am applying to because I am more likely to get merit aid?
  • liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    Also, since my EFC is so high, should I not even bother applying for financial aid at the schools I am applying to because I am more likely to get merit aid?
  • Erin's DadErin's Dad Super Moderator Posts: 34,279 Super Moderator
    What is your home state? I think Case may give you $15K/year but that would leave a lot to pay.
  • mommdcmommdc Registered User Posts: 8,634 Senior Member
    Yes, Ohio State and Pitt might possibly give you full tuition, but also apply to schools where you can get guaranteed merit.

    Did you apply to Ohio State and Pitt yet? If not do it real soon, send your test scores asap because they have to be there for tOSU merit deadline of Nov 1.

    Pitt scholarship committee will also start meeting in a few weeks, so applying soon is a good idea.

    What is your home state?
  • liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    Thanks ; I totally forgot to submit SAT scores to my colleges, I just did thanks to your advice. I'm from Connecticut.
  • mommdcmommdc Registered User Posts: 8,634 Senior Member
    I don't know how much instate UConn would cost, but maybe you can get scholarship through honors college so look at inststate options too.
  • liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    I am also planning to apply to UConn honors; however this year Uconn has been slammed with budget cuts from 100 million to 300 million for the next two years and thus many programs and its ranking will inevitably be affected. It's a good college though and affordable but a little too close to home for me.
  • liveluvsushiliveluvsushi Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    Yeah, @Erin's Dad I don't think I'd be able to afford Case if I "only" got 15,000 but I'm looking into its 6-7 year dental program which might be worth the loans. I'm from CT.
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