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How to Become Resident in WI/OH/IN?

RTHPRTRTHPRT Posts: 37Registered User Junior Member
Can out-of-state students become residents after one-year of enrollment in a state college? Do you need to be an independent student? pay state tax etc.? Anyone knows about the rules for the following states (colleges): Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana?

Thanks!
Post edited by RTHPRT on

Replies to: How to Become Resident in WI/OH/IN?

  • simbasimba Posts: 6,092Registered User Senior Member
    "Can out-of-state students become residents after one-year of enrollment in a state college?"

    In most cases NO.

    each state has different requirements. You may want to check with each state.
  • swimcatsmomswimcatsmom Posts: 15,029Registered User Senior Member
    Don't know the specifics for those States but every State I know of you cannot start school as a non-resident then become a resident. You generally have to have been a resident of the State at least a year - sometimes longer - before you start school. Otherwise everyone would go to school as a non-res then change after a year. Do a search at one of the State schools websites for residency requirements and you will find this is pretty universal.
  • volleyball0815volleyball0815 Posts: 128Registered User Junior Member
    Cousin from Ohio went to Purdue & was able to be considered in state by second year I think. Anway, I know he had to claim residency in Indiana (friends of the family that live in Lafayette actually) and he got an Indiana drivers license. Another friend from around here going to Purdue- family bought a house out there (their son went to Purdue also) & she's able to claim Indiana residency through that house.
  • hsmomstefhsmomstef Posts: 3,579Registered User Senior Member
    for each state school, just google the school name and "residency requirements" and you will usually get a link to the specifics. each state and school are different -- and usually very specific.

    keep in mind that if you are a dependent for Financial aid purposes, your state of residence is that of your parents no matter what you do. Only independent students can change their state of residence (and independent students are those that are 24 or older, married, have a child, have already earned a BA or served in the miltary)
  • sybbie719sybbie719 Posts: 16,931Super Moderator Senior Member
    attached is the college board guide to state residency.

    http://www.collegeboard.com/about/association/international/residency.html

    click on the state, it will tell you the requirements. Or you can contact the colleges directly to find out their guide to state residency for instate tuition aid purposes

    Most colleges do not allow you to be come a resident for the sole purpose of getting instate tuition.

    For the most part, as long as you are a dependent student, you will be a resident wherever your parents have their primary home
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 37,606Registered User Senior Member
    >>Can out-of-state students become residents after one-year of enrollment in a state college? >>

    Short answer...NO. Re: the story about Purdue above...I doubt that is still able to happen (if indeed it's even true). In Ohio...answer is NO. In Wisc the answer is NO. If your family moves to one of these states, you would be considered an instate resident after the family lives there for a year. Re: purchasing a house...the STUDENT would need to purchase the house AND show that he/she has earned enough money to support himself/herself in that house without parent support to be considered independent. Please folks...it is VERY hard to independent or gain in state tuition for college purposes only. In almost every case, the state in which your parents reside is considered the student's state of residence until they are 25.

    And most importantly...the requirement for being independent for TAX purposes is very very different than the requirement for financial aid purposes. For tax purposes, you can be independent if you are providing greater than 50% of your financial support. The finaid calculations don't care AT ALL whether you are declared a dependent or not on your parents' tax returns. To be independent for finaid, you must be over 24, or have a dependent child you fully support, or be married, or be an orphan, or be a veteran, or have your first bachelors degree. Simply moving to a state will not gain you residency either...even if you support yourself. AND in almost all cases, you cannot gain residency for in state purposes WHILE you are attending college.
  • dianab93dianab93 Posts: 4Registered User New Member
    What if your mother is from the state you want to take residency up in and her mother still lives there? Can you change your address to the grandmother's address, get a state driver's license, register to vote in that state, pay income tax in that state and then declare residency in that state?
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 37,606Registered User Senior Member
    >>Can you change your address to the grandmother's address, get a state driver's license, register to vote in that state, pay income tax in that state and then declare residency in that state?>>

    NO...I grew up in Ohio. My whole family lives in Ohio. Ohio has terrific public universities. My kids are residents of the state *I* live in (not Ohio), not the state their grandparents live in, or the state I grew up in.

    The state in which your PARENTS reside is the state of your residency for college instate tuition purposes in most cases. To become independent for financial aid purposes you must be over 24, or married, or the parent of a dependent child who you support, or have your first bachelor's degree, or be an orphan, or be a veteran. For finaid purposes, it doesn't matter where you pay tax, where you have a driver's license, or whether or not your parents declare you on their income taxes, or where you are registered to vote, or where your grandmother lives now, or where your mom used to live.
  • hsmomstefhsmomstef Posts: 3,579Registered User Senior Member
    thumper1 is correct -- your parents would have to move. Your residence is the same as your parents (regardless of where you live or who you live with) until you are independent (according to FAFSA rules).

    another item to note -- if you do not graduate from a local state high school, it automatically triggers a review of the residency status. In other words, if you apply to a school in Ohio claiming residence in Ohio, listing your grandmother's address and with an Ohio state driver's license your diploma from a Florida high school will have them taking a very close look at your claims of residency.
  • RTHPRTRTHPRT Posts: 37Registered User Junior Member
    If parents divorced and live in different states, can the student be considered resident in either state? Or, can it be changed to the state the student will attend college?
  • swimcatsmomswimcatsmom Posts: 15,029Registered User Senior Member
    If parents divorced and live in different states, can the student be considered resident in either state?
    I know one student whose parents are divorced and she went to high school in the State one parent resides in but is going to college in the State the non custodial parent lives in as an in-state student. I know another whose parents are not divorced but they are moving and one parent moved a year in advance while the other stayed behind (so she could finish her senior year out) and she is able to go in either State as an in-state. In both cases each parent has lived in the relevant State for over a year before the student will start college.
    Or, can it be changed to the state the student will attend college?

    I am confused by the wording of the question - It reads as if you mean a totally different State but that does not make sense as obviously you would not be able to do that. Do you mean changed to the State the parent lives in? If so - possibly - see above. Each State varies so check with the States in question. Most schools will list residency requirements on their web sites.
  • hsmomstefhsmomstef Posts: 3,579Registered User Senior Member
    if you are trying to establish residency where your non-custodial parent lives you need to really do some checking. As I said before, if you don't graduate from a school in the state you are planning on attending as an in-state student, it really gets some attention. Each school has very specific rules regarding residency and some may allow a student to declare residency with either parent and some may not -- that is one of those things to determine ahead of time and get it in writing!
  • swimcatsmomswimcatsmom Posts: 15,029Registered User Senior Member
    that is one of those things to determine ahead of time and get it in writing!

    excellent point
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 37,606Registered User Senior Member
    >>If parents divorced and live in different states, can the student be considered resident in either state?>>

    Your parent for residency purposes is the one where you live more than 50% of the time. AND the same parent is the one you will use on the FAFSA as your custodial parent. If you live with your dad more than 1/2 of the time, HIS state would be the state of your residency. If you live with your mom more than 1/2 of the time, then HER state would be the state of residency. And...anticipating your next question...you can't mix and match. In other words, you can't use your mom's income on the FAFSA because it's lower, and then put your dad's residence (if it's a different states) because THAT is the state where you want instate residency. Oh...and another one...if you attend private residential school in a state DIFFERENT from the one where your custodial parent resides, that won't give you in state residency in that state either.

    If you want to be a resident of a state for in state tuition purposes, your family should move to the new state sometime during your junior year of high school...or sooner.
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