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How do you "qualify" for in state tuition

collegebound41collegebound41 Posts: 1,267Registered User Senior Member
Obviously if you went to high school in that state.......,but i've heard there are ways around the system. Depending on the state of course, is it true that if you lived in that state and paid taxes for X years or went to elementary/middle school for X years you would get in state tuition? I've also heard that if you buy property in that and just held on to it(this used to work).

Any truth to these scenarios?
Post edited by collegebound41 on
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Replies to: How do you "qualify" for in state tuition

  • icedragonicedragon Posts: 2,170Registered User Senior Member
    No, you have to live in state for a year before you go to college
  • swimcatsmomswimcatsmom Posts: 15,013Registered User Senior Member
    No, no truth to those scenarios.
    Depending on the state of course, is it true that if you lived in that state and paid taxes for X years or went to lementary/middle school for X years you would get in state tuition?
    No it is not true.
    I've also heard that if you buy property in that and just held on to it(this used to work).

    Owning property in a state on it's own does not qualify you as instate for tuition. You (and more specifically your parents if you are considered a dependent student) have to show residency in a state. Live there, work there, drivers license, voting registration etc.

    Residency is usually based on the parent's current state of residency. Most States expect the residency to have been established at least a year before starting college - that is residency cannot be established while attending college in the State. For some states it may be 2 years.
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 37,140Registered User Senior Member
    i've heard there are ways around the system

    Simply not true in MOST cases. The bottom line is that to be considered for instate tuition as an undergrad, you PARENTS state of residency must be where you are attending college. It really doesn't matter where you live or what you are doing if you are under 24. You will be considered a resident of the state in which your parents reside.

    There are some exceptions...if you are an emancipated student, you could qualify for instate tuition on your own merits...but this is not an easy status to gain. It means that you have cut off ALL contact with your family...ALL. And in addition it means you have generated enough income to support yourself including food, clothing, rent/mortgage, utilities, insurance, EVERY living expense...because you are not getting any support from your family.

    PLEASE...I think you KNOW which state you have instate tuition in. Stop trying to think of a loophole. If you really want in state tuition, convince your family they should move to that OTHER state at the end of your junior year of high school.
  • NorthstarmomNorthstarmom Posts: 24,853Registered User Senior Member
    It depends on the state. Usually public colleges post their policies on their websites.
  • eucalyptus2eucalyptus2 Posts: 343Registered User Junior Member
    The only scenario possible to pay in-state tuition is if your parents are divorce and live in a different state from each other.
  • stillnadinestillnadine Posts: 346Registered User Member
    Some state universities, University of South Carolina for one, offers in-state tuition to out of state students who meet minimum GPA/Sat requirements. They also offer additional scholarships to such students. Some state univeristies are part of consortiums that offer in-state tuition to students from neighboring states. As Northstarmom suggests, check their websites for info.
  • notrichenoughnotrichenough Posts: 5,546Registered User Senior Member
    Some state universities, University of South Carolina for one, offers in-state tuition to out of state students who meet minimum GPA/Sat requirements.
    Do you have a link from U of SC's web site that describes this? I took a look but couldn't find anything that talked about this.
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 37,140Registered User Senior Member
    Some state universities, University of South Carolina for one, offers in-state tuition to out of state students who meet minimum GPA/Sat requirements. They also offer additional scholarships to such students

    This is NOT true. U of South Carolina offers instate tuition to students who receive certain scholarships...not based on minimum GPA/SAT requirements. In fact, the scholarship award criteria varies from year to year. Students who receive the McNair Scholarship get a free ride. The Cooper and McNair scholarships reduce tuition to the instate rate. Departmental scholarships in excess of a certain amount offer reduced tuition, but not reduced quite to the instate rate.

    BUT having said all of that, if you have really good stats, you might be eligible for one of U of South Carolina's fine scholarships.

    U of North Texas has a similar deal whereby students who receive scholarships in excess of a certain amount also get the instate tuition rate.
  • eucalyptus2eucalyptus2 Posts: 343Registered User Junior Member
    Also the in-state tuitions for students from neighboring states only applies if a specific major is not offer in the state one reside.
  • momofthreeboysmomofthreeboys Posts: 11,571Registered User Senior Member
    Also the in-state tuitions for students from neighboring states only applies if a specific major is not offer in the state one reside.

    Also not quite true, The western states have WUE which is not contingent on specific major. I believe other states have agreements also that are not contingent on the major. It is best to check websites for the specific requirements.
  • sk8rmomsk8rmom Posts: 5,746Registered User Senior Member
    College Board has detailed requirements for every state on their website. Suggest you start your search there as there are variations from state to state.
  • stillnadinestillnadine Posts: 346Registered User Member
    I did not mean to imply that every student with specific GPA/SAT is granted in-state tuition in USC, only that South Carolina is very generous to out of state students that they want to attract. Unlike North Carolina schools, which limit out-of-state students to a percentage, South Carolina is actively recruiting higher achieving students from out of state. And by "higher" I mean solid but not necessarily stellar stats. You can check the USC forum on CC for details about "who received what." About 30% of the students are OOS.

    The OP was asking about ways to go OOS but pay in-state tuition. One way is to look at state schools that want to attract rather than limit OOS. University of Wyoming also has a very generous program for OOS students.
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 37,140Registered User Senior Member
    Is it University of Minnesota that charges minimally more to OOS students?
  • collegebound41collegebound41 Posts: 1,267Registered User Senior Member
    ^^^thumper, i think so. But, they also have some program where bordering states also get in-state tuition
  • akckakck Posts: 285Registered User Junior Member
    While state universities may be hard to get in state tuition, it can be relatively easy to get in state tuition for community colleges. It can be as simple as showing a utility bill before enrolling. One of my sons went to one where they told him he just needed to enroll in one online class to qualify. Unfortunately, residency status at a community college won't necessarily qualify you for residency at the state universities.
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