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which colleges allow you to become instate after 6-12 months

somebeastsomebeast Posts: 334Registered User Member
Im from new york and i came to conclusion that all the huge famous with campus like feeling are not in new york.
I want to study somewhere else I would plan to live there forever if i get accepted .
now which schools from the big schools such as ohio state,michigan etc allow you to become instate after a year or have fee waivers or good financial support for those who need it?
Post edited by somebeast on

Replies to: which colleges allow you to become instate after 6-12 months

  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 35,891Registered User Senior Member
    If you want to be an instate resident for tuition purposes in Ohio OR Michigan...your FAMILY will need to relocate to Ohio or Michigan (whichever ONE you want for instate purposes) at LEAST 12 months prior to your enrollment in college in that state. The criteria for establishing instate residency in those states is stated on their websites. FAMILIES must establish residency in the state at least 12 months prior to the student enrolling in college. The STUDENT cannot establish residency in the state unless the parents do so. If the student has "independent status" (which is very difficult to attain if you live with your parents out of state in high school), the student would STILL have to reside and WORK in Ohio or Michigan for at least 12 months prior to college enrollment.

    If you are an undergrad residing in NY state, your state of residency is New York...and there are very few states where this could be circumvented. Ohio and Michigan will not likely allow you instate residency status (neither will CT, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, NC, Pennsylvania...and MANY others).

    Texas might allow you to do so IF you buy property IN YOUR NAME (the student's name) at least 12 months prior to college enrollment.

    The reality is your parents and you pay taxes to the state of New York and those taxes in part support your higher education options at your public universities in New York. Your family is NOT doing this in another state.
  • somebeastsomebeast Posts: 334Registered User Member
    Im in cc right now im almost 23 i will be 24 when i want to initiate this plan being independent then will be pretty easy still some schools allow you to become instate after a year so which one do?

    Like i said i would mostly likely stay forever in the state of my school.
  • sk8rmomsk8rmom Posts: 5,746Registered User Senior Member
    You have the whole SUNY system at your disposal and can't find a single school you like? Which schools have you looked at, what is your intended major, and what part of the state are you from? I can understand not wanting to live in NY for the rest of your life, but that $5K/year tuition is going to be VERY hard to beat...I believe I'd consider finishing up in two years with the least amount of debt and then relocating with the least amount of debt possible hanging over my head! Or are your folks willing to help pay for OOS expenses? Both Ohio and Michigan are going to be pricey for you and both have major budget problems of their own, having recently cut support for their instate students it seems unlikely they're going to give you much aid.

    Btw, with 27K students, the largest school in the SUNY system by far is UB. They're pretty well known and are a major research uni.
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 35,891Registered User Senior Member
    i will be 24 when i want to initiate this plan being independent then will be pretty easy still some schools allow you to become instate after a year so which one do?

    Where are you going to the CC....in NY state?

    MOST states do not allow folks (even independent students) to become instate residents WHILE they are attending college. It is highly likely that you will have to reside in and work in your "new state" for 12 months PRIOR to your enrollment in college as an instate student. Even independent adults need to adhere to the rules for establishing residency.

    If *I* wanted to go to UMich...*I* would have to move there now...wait a year, work etc...to establish instate residency for tuition purposes.
  • momofthreeboysmomofthreeboys Posts: 11,398Registered User Senior Member
    ^^Yes we've known a few young people who have moved to another state, worked for a year or two and returned to college to finish their degrees. In all the cases the kids were at least 24 and had lived for at least a year in that state. All were granted in-state tuition and most considered independent (as they were at least 24). One was younger than 24 so was not considered independent for financial aid but was considered a resident of the state as he'd been there for a couple years. When he turned 24 he was able to file FAFSA as an independent for his senior year.

    The key here is that most states will not allow you to go and take classes (as an out of state student) and convert immediately to instate after 12 months. Most will classify you as out of state and you will remain out of state if you start school immediately. Do your research carefully.
  • somebeastsomebeast Posts: 334Registered User Member
    what are some big out state schools that give good aid to oos students and perhaps transfers as well.
    Im going to ncc in nassu.
    I also complied my own friendly to oos list with schools with tution of 10k max per year for oos but i would like to go to better schools and perhaps pay 7k max oos with aid.
    another question do colleges notice if you took fluffy classes such as acting and voice?
  • sk8rmomsk8rmom Posts: 5,746Registered User Senior Member
    Yes, colleges notice...your entire transcript will be evaluated for course articulation as the school you transfer to will have to decide which credits they're going to accept toward their degree programs. Depending on your major at the transfer school, you may have to take additional classes or retake certain courses that don't exactly line up (ie. intro physics vs. calculus based physics) in order to satisfy their graduation requirements. Your transfer advisor will work with you on that once you're accepted but some schools have a course articulation system online. Not to beat a dead horse, but that is an advantage of staying in the SUNY system - gen ed requirements are the same systemwide so you're more likely to get credit for the courses you've already had.
  • thumper1thumper1 Posts: 35,891Registered User Senior Member
    Many schools offer their best aid to students as incoming freshmen. Transfers sometimes don't get aid at all. You need to check the schools.

    I think finding an OOS school where your OOS tuition is going to be less than $10K is going to be a challenge...U of Minnesota might be a choice. U of South Carolina too.

    But remember to add in housing...it's not free...

    Re: courses...yes they notice. The other thing YOU need to check is what it will take to complete your major. It is very possible that if you transfer, you will need an additional year at the big OOS university to complete your degree. That fifth year needs to be added into your costs.
  • somebeastsomebeast Posts: 334Registered User Member
    I can afford about 15k with boarding maybe strech to 18k
    A kid in my cc got 30k discount for nyu and he had a 3.5 would it be possible to get something like this for oos schools.
    also lets say i would continue in cc say in ohio are there any schools that have agreements with ohio state for articulation and grants.

    Im asking will it matter admissions wise ? not credits to be transfered wise
  • Erin's DadErin's Dad Posts: 18,776Super Moderator Senior Member
    First, you would STILL pay OOS rates. While you are attending CC in Ohio the clock does not start on your one year residency requirement. That being said,
    An articulation agreement also exists between Ohio State University and seven community colleges in Ohio, including Clark State Community College, Cuyahoga Community College, Lakeland Community College, Lorain Community College, Owens Community College and Sinclair Community College.
    FinAid | Other Types of Aid | College Partnerships and Articulation Agreements
  • robinsuesandersrobinsuesanders Posts: 485Registered User Member
    OP says:
    Im in cc right now im almost 23 i will be 24 when i want to initiate this plan being independent then will be pretty easy still some schools allow you to become instate after a year so which one do?

    The only way to get in-state tuition at another state's public colleges is to MOVE to the state and establish your legal domicile there *before* you apply (as a transfer student) to your public college of choice. Many state government web pages will have descriptions of what it takes to establish domicile in the state.

    To establish your domicile in the new state, you typically need to do all of the following:

    1) Live in the new state for at least 12 months WITHOUT taking any college classes, including community college classes.

    2) Get a full-time job in the new state and pay local and state taxes. The job doesn't have to be a great one, but it MUST provide you with enough income for you to support yourself!

    3) Fully support yourself for the year you are working and not going to school: You must be able to file both state and federal tax returns as your own dependent and you must not be listed as a dependent on your parents' tax returns.

    4) Physically stay in the NEW state except for (very) brief trips. In other words, you'll need to not go home for stays of a month or two at Christmas and in the summer time. Some states are more restrictive of this than others, so check the web pages. My D successfully established her domicile in MI after dropping out of college. When she later decided to return to college, she was classified as an in-state student there, but if I recall correctly, one of the guidelines her MI public school used for determining domicile in MI was whether a person spends more than a week or so out of state at a given time.

    5) Transfer your driver's license to the new state. If you own a car, transfer your car registration to the new state. Buy car insurance in the NEW state. This also means NOT driving a car owned by your parents with OOS plates.

    6) Register to vote in the new state.

    The twelve month waiting period, the job, the filing taxes as your own dependent, being physically present in the state except for short periods of time, and transferring your driver's license, car registration, and voter registration are all indications that you moved to the state for the purpose of establishing domicile, not just going to college. The fact that you'll be 24 (and can file the FAFSA as an independent student) when you apply for admission to the college will help IF AND ONLY IF you've already established domicile in the new state.
  • happymomof1happymomof1 Posts: 19,182Registered User Senior Member
    In Maryland, you are in-state for tuition/fees at community colleges after three months. 12 months residence is required for the public universities. For information about the colleges and universities in Maryland, visit MDgo4it
  • sk8rmomsk8rmom Posts: 5,746Registered User Senior Member
    I'm a bit confused...do you think that Ohio is somehow radically different than western NY? Have you ever been to the Buffalo/Western NY area schools? They are bordering and, having driven throughout and stayed in Ohio for many years, WNY is much nicer than many parts of Ohio (no offense to Ohio!). NYS student aid is, I'm pretty sure, significantly more generous as well. And your education wouldn't be interrupted to wait for residency (which would still result in a higher cost). I really think you should spend some time there and also check out your neighboring WNY options.
  • Erin's DadErin's Dad Posts: 18,776Super Moderator Senior Member
    Sorry Sk8rmom, offense taken. :) Actually you are right that WNY is much nicer than many areas of OH, just as many areas of OH are nicer than areas of NY. And you are absolutely correct that SUNY schools are less expensive than OH state schools.
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