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How hard it is to get accepted in American grad school with European bachelor degree?

IamMaryIamMary Posts: 1Registered User New Member
edited November 2012 in Graduate School
Hi, so I'm a sophomore at American University in Bulgaria, but I'm planning to transfer by the end of the year. So far I was not concerned whether the university of my future choice would have American or European education system, but I got worried after my professor told me that, American universities rarely accept applicants with European bachelor degree and it becomes much easier to get accepted at American grad school if you have graduated any American university in Europe. plus, they don't accept 3 years bachelor and bologna process and stuff like that. So, as far as I would like to pursue my masters later in the US I get concerned what kind of choice should I make? do you guys think that it is really like this, that American grad schools favor the ones that have graduated American university in Europe, and it is hard to get in with European diploma? did any one of you have any kind of experience like this? I am very concerned, because I really want to leave American University in Bulgaria (AUBG) and transfer to the I think is better, but if my professor is right, I will probably have to sacrifice myself and graduate from AUBG, which will be a disaster for me. Please help, I will really appreciate it
Post edited by IamMary on

Replies to: How hard it is to get accepted in American grad school with European bachelor degree?

  • happymomof1happymomof1 Posts: 19,627Registered User Senior Member
    Start here: EducationUSA | Study Abroad, Student Visa, University Fairs, College Applications and Study in the U.S. / America
    When you have read through it, follow the links to find the contact information for the advising center in your country. The counselors there can help you with everything.

    Each graduate program in the US sets its own admission policy. You have to contact the departments themselves, and ask about grad admissions.
  • b@r!umb@r!um Posts: 9,532Registered User Senior Member
    plus, they don't accept 3 years bachelor and bologna process and stuff like that.
    In my own personal experience, most American graduate programs accept European 3-year Bachelor's degree, but yes, there are a few that don't. I wouldn't worry about it though. If you find a program that wouldn't accept your European degree, cross it off your list and move on.
    So far I was not concerned whether the university of my future choice would have American or European education system, but I got worried after my professor told me that, American universities rarely accept applicants with European bachelor degree and it becomes much easier to get accepted at American grad school if you have graduated any American university in Europe.
    I can only share my personal experience, which may not be representative of graduate programs in other disciplines. But having talked to professors in my discipline who make graduate admission decisions, it seems that their bias against foreign degrees comes mostly from an uncertainty about the program: if they are not familiar with your undergraduate program, they might not know how rigorous your courses were taught or what your grades mean or whether they can trust your letters of recommendation.

    In my discipline, that's equally a concern for less-well-known American colleges as for universities overseas. (I.e. coming from an unknown American college would be no better than coming from an unknown European one.) However, it's not a bias that you cannot overcome. Many American graduate programs enroll more than 50% international students!

    Don't let your professor "guilt" you into staying at your current university if you don't think it's a good choice for you!
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