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Can someone please tell me if they know of masters programs that deal with medical devices?

Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
I'm really interested in going to a grad school that will allow me to become involved with medical device development. Some of the programs I'm really interested in is
USC: Master of Science in Medical Device and Diagnostic Engineering
UCSD: Medical Devices and Systems

Can anyone please provide me with suggestions on what programs are similar to these?

Replies to: Can someone please tell me if they know of masters programs that deal with medical devices?

  • Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    Or even if it's not like those programs exactly, at least some programs that deal with medical device development?
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 10,162 Senior Member
    Such graduate programs usually require an undergraduate degree in engineering, preferably in biomedical or mechanical engineering.
  • Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    edited July 13
    Yes I have that. I finished my undergraduate biomedical degree last year and I'm trying to apply now.
  • oldschooldadoldschooldad Registered User Posts: 34 Junior Member
    Check out University of Minnesota. I don't know specifics, but university is quite active in this area with many collaborations/contacts/recruiting/research with local companies like Boston Scientific, Medtronic, 3M, St. Jude, and startups. Med device industry is big in Twin Cities.

  • Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    thanks!
  • Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    do you guys have any other suggestions? ill probably apply to U of M.
  • BeaudreauBeaudreau Registered User Posts: 972 Member
    @Vreddy704 - I have been looking at this because my middle son will be a junior this fall at Miami (Ohio), majoring in Biomedical Engineering with a minor in Mechanical Engineering.

    Check out Purdue. https://engineering.purdue.edu/BME/Academics/Graduate

    There are a lot of options at Purdue, but this one looks really cool: https://engineering.purdue.edu/BME/Academics/Graduate/Degree_Options/MS/BDDImmersion
  • Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    thank you! that does seem pretty good. ill look into it.
  • Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    maybe we can exchange schools we're interested in if u want to
  • AuraObscuraAuraObscura Registered User Posts: 556 Member
    edited July 15
    You don't really need a Master's in medical device development or a program that focuses on medical devices. Any program that builds your knowledge of advanced topics in engineering, be it mechanical, electrical, or CS, is what's most important. In other words, I wouldn't say it's necessary to look specifically for programs that deal with medical devices or that have "medical devices" in the name. Instead, look for programs that offer coursework in specific engineering topics that are relevant to your goals, or if you're aiming for a thesis MS, look for departments with faculty doing research in relevant and interesting areas.

    Most importantly, in the medical device industry, advanced degrees are good but experience is king. For example, just glancing at the coursework requirements for that USC MS in Medical Device and Diagnostic Engineering program, I'm more than a little skeptical that such a program would be of much help in the medical device industry. Of the 7 required courses, a whopping 3 of them focus on things like regulation, quality management, device development, etc. From the technical electives, they allow you to choose courses on Six Sigma, "Health Care Operations Improvement", and management of engineering teams? I can't imagine a hiring manager would place much or any value in any of these courses; in the medical device industry, hiring managers generally look for people who have actual experience with these things, not people who have just taken classes on them. If you're getting an MS in engineering for the purposes of getting into medical devices, you should be learning as much advanced technical material and gaining as many advanced technical skills as possible. Everything else is fluff, for the most part.
  • BeaudreauBeaudreau Registered User Posts: 972 Member
    @AuraObscura - Your points are good. I liked the Purdue program because it included two semesters of industry internships. Or course, someone really interested in this would need to find out where students actually work. Jobs at Stryker would mean a lot more than jobs with some regulatory body.
  • AuraObscuraAuraObscura Registered User Posts: 556 Member
    @Beadreau Just to clarify, I didn't mean that one should be wary of all programs with a focus on medical devices, just that they should be examined a little more closely. The Purdue program, in addition to requiring industry internships, also seems pretty technical, and would be an example of a good program. And you also bring up a good point with regard to student outcomes--it's a good idea to look at where graduates of these programs actually end up.
  • Vreddy704Vreddy704 Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    Thanks for that advice. That makes a lot of sense I”ll definitely expand and look in more places in that case. I’m planning on doing a non-thesis masters, so my plan then is to look through all the class syllabi for programs that do a good job building a strong knowledge base (regulation, quality management, device development) and preferably give internships and jobs afterward as well.
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