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What is a good GRE range for Stanford and the ivies?

LionHeadedLionHeaded Posts: 365Registered User Member
edited January 8 in Graduate School
I realize that not all ivies may not the same lower limit so let's break it down between HYPS and the others.

Thanks in advance!
Post edited by LionHeaded on
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Replies to: What is a good GRE range for Stanford and the ivies?

  • elpopeelpope Posts: 326Registered User Member
    uh, it obviously depends on the program... obviously stanford PhD engineering is going to be a bit harder to get into than a masters in education at brown

    its dumb to say "the ivies" for grad school anyway... the best schools depend heavily on the field
  • LionHeadedLionHeaded Posts: 365Registered User Member
    Oh I'm sorry i forgot to add that the field is or rather would be, psychology. And it's not for a program choice, just for a discussion I'm having in general about the elite's schools gre cutoffs. I figured the ivies would be at the top.
  • 14_of_spades14_of_spades Posts: 222Registered User Junior Member
    What kind of answer are you looking for?

    >1300

    >1400

    >1500??


    Obviously, there's no one "answer" to this question.
  • PhD-Bound?PhD-Bound? Posts: 155Registered User Junior Member
    I agree with spades. My feeling is that the total package (GPA, research, letters, GRE, statements) counts more than the test scores.
  • sarbruissarbruis Posts: 290Registered User Junior Member
    1600 is pretty good.
  • undisclosedundisclosed Posts: 965Registered User Member
    Jesus Christ folks, of course there's an answer. He's not saying that GRE is the only thing that matters. He's asking for the range of scores for those admitted to these schools.

    Sheesh. People around here are so fast to 'impart' and appear clever, they lack common sense sometimes.

    I would say over 1300 is the minimum range for most top 10s.

    Though with HYPS I'd go as far as to say that it's 1400 to have a strong shot. Sure you'll find applicants with less but generally that's what i believe to be competitive.
  • 14_of_spades14_of_spades Posts: 222Registered User Junior Member
    Umm... chill out.

    So your position is that there "is" an answer?? Fine, let's go with that argument for a second.

    If you happened to notice, the average of my 3 answers is the answer given by you.

    That said, there are folks who had <1400 who got in, and certainly people with >1400 who didn't get in. As such, it's not really much of an "answer" is it?


    So no, there is no "answer". The GRE is important. A higher score is always better than a lower score. Scores above 1400 put you in the ballpark. But the same can be said for 1300. And for some folks, they might want 1500 before they start feeling safe.

    I don't see how your reply is any better than mine. Who's trying to appear clever?
  • molliebatmitmolliebatmit Posts: 12,306Super Moderator Senior Member
    I'm not sure I believe that all programs have a hard-and-fast GRE cutoff. Certainly many programs are willing to take international/English as a non-first language students with low verbal scores.

    To use UCLAri's metaphor, GRE scores are either a red or green flag on your application. But even if your scores raise a red flag, other parts of your application can mitigate the impact of those scores. It all depends on what the rest of the application looks like.
  • spleniumsplenium Posts: 9Registered User New Member
    For what it's worth, I was a student member of the admissions committee in a science PhD program at Stanford. GREs were simply not that important. Really bad scores can be a problem (especially math for us, and by really bad I mean less than ~60th percentile), but a good score is orders of magnitude less important that research experience/letters of recommendation, and substantially less important than undergrad grades/academic background.

    Think about it - at least in sciences and probably social sciences and humanities, admissions committees are looking for people who are going to do good lab work on one project for years. Why would you care very much how someone does on a three hour test? I like to tell people that grad school is a marathon, not a sprint, and I think that's true in admissions as well.
  • porkypigporkypig Posts: 144Registered User Junior Member
    My Ivy social science program uses GREs as a quick way to eliminate candidates on a first pass - below 1300 and something would have to make us take a closer look at the file, particularly if the recs are not from someone that is known to the committee...
  • snowcapksnowcapk Posts: 338Registered User Member
    While the average admitted applicant has a combined verbal and quantitative GRE score of 1350 or higher, candidates with lower scores will be given serious consideration if other parts of the application are extraordinary. We have admitted applicants with scores as low as 1200. (Harvard Psychology Dept. Website)

    OP, why don't you just call the others up and ask?
  • BurntToast1BurntToast1 Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    I got a 1290 GRE (730Q 560V & 4.0 writing) and got accepted to Stanford graduate ME as a top applicant. Don't look at these forums and freak out like I did after receiving your GRE score. Your future should not be decided on one test and the top schools are smarter than to judge you like that. GRE's can never help your application, only hurt it if you do really really poorly.
  • Lithium10Lithium10 Posts: 2Registered User New Member
    hey thats really awsome... i was looking for some one with a GRE score not <1300 and getting accepted by stanford...

    can u please share ur profile...i m fall 2011 aspirant...

    if u do not wanna go public with ur profile [PM me]
  • MmeZeeZeeMmeZeeZee Posts: 490Registered User Member
    Wait, isn't fall 2011 already done? Wouldn't you have to have applied already, like in January?

    Good luck. I have no idea, honestly, but I think that calling politely and asking a succinct question, if it is not too late to make a difference, is fine. The counselors should be able to tell you. Also, look at the average on their websites. They usually have it.
  • Lithium10Lithium10 Posts: 2Registered User New Member
    duh... MmeZeeZee i really doubt ur analytical skills now... i have already applied and 'aspiring' to start classes in fall 2011...anyways thanks for the concern...cheerz.
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