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GRE Scores for Engineering

lkf725lkf725 Posts: 4,781Registered User Senior Member
edited June 2009 in Graduate School
What are acceptable scores and what are good scores for grad school in engineering? How much do they care about verbal and writing scores?
Post edited by lkf725 on

Replies to: GRE Scores for Engineering

  • rogracerrogracer Posts: 1,204Registered User Senior Member
    According to US News, there isn't much difference in the GRE Quant scores for any of the schools in the top-30....all pretty much have averages over 750. But, I really don't think GREs are weighted that much for admissions...it's more about GPAs and professor contacts.
  • lkf725lkf725 Posts: 4,781Registered User Senior Member
    Thanks rogracer! Assuming 750+ quant score, do you think a mediocre verbal score (in the 500's) would be a deterrent to admission? Would that situation make it worth retaking the gre?
  • rogracerrogracer Posts: 1,204Registered User Senior Member
    Scores for verbal are in the mid 500 range....I don't see any schools with average verbal over 600. But again, I don't think GRE's are considered anywhere near as much as SATs where during undergrad.
  • lkf725lkf725 Posts: 4,781Registered User Senior Member
    Thanks again for your opinion. I would hope that 4 years of great grades, work experience and research would supercede a single test, but you never know!
  • joyjoy1321joyjoy1321 Posts: 125Registered User Junior Member
    For PhD in Engineering at a top school you want to have Math around 760-800. Verbal and writing can be much lower. Maybe mid 500's to mid 600s? Definitely don't need 700s in verbal. For writing, not sure. You probably want to get at least a 4.5.

    Basically when I was applying for PhD I saw the GREs as a gate. If you do "good enough" then they essentially ignore your scores. I think the GRE can really only hurt you. Recommendations and essays are much more important.
  • RacinReaverRacinReaver Posts: 6,598Registered User Senior Member
    I wound up with a 720Q/610V/5.5W and didn't have any problems getting into a couple of top-10 programs in my field. I should have done better on the math part, but, well, I didn't study at all and had no clue what kind of math was going to be on the test. Also should have reviewed some test taking strategies, since I wound up with six minutes left on the last problem (the adaptive testing is waaaaaaaay different than the normal standardized testing you're used to). :(
  • NewtonNewton Posts: 253Registered User Junior Member
    what if everythign else is good, but your verbal score is in 450-500 range?
  • Confused519Confused519 Posts: 12Registered User New Member
    What field are you in, and what was your GPA?
  • cosmicfishcosmicfish Posts: 3,316Registered User Senior Member
    In general, a 500V 4.5AW will clear the bar just about anywhere. A 450V 4.0AW will still get by, it just won't dazzle anyone. Below that and you probably have some explaining to do.

    The only places that will occasionally expect more are some of the Ivy's - not for any reason realted to engineering, just because those schools place more credit in being well-rounded.
  • BoelterHallBoelterHall Posts: 2,926Registered User Senior Member
    What's the average score for Stanford/MIT applicants?
    Most curious about verbal.
  • Blah2009Blah2009 Posts: 1,252Registered User Senior Member
    GRE scores are used as a minimum barrier. Great scores therefore will not significantly help you get in. GRE scores for stanford/mit are around 1380 with 790 math and 580 for verbal. it doesn't really matter though, since you can get substantially lower on verbal, and slightly lower in math. Your undergrad grades, research experiences, publications, occasionally interview skills, and letters of recommendation matter a lot more.
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