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Help me get to grad school...

gunitogunito Posts: 5Registered User New Member
edited November 2009 in Graduate School
I graduated this may with a 2.2 gpa, horrible, i know. Over the past month ive realized the the only thing im passionate about is psychology. Ideally id like to get into neuropsych or behavioral neuroscience. I thought about getting a 2nd degree, but i dont know if that will help. I moved away from where i attended school, so i dont know how to get my grades up. What can i do to go to grad school?
Post edited by gunito on
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Replies to: Help me get to grad school...

  • asian75asian75 Posts: 448Registered User Member
    no where. I am sorry, but most program require 3.0 to apply. Look for some state school in midwest maybe
  • ticklemepinkticklemepink Posts: 2,764Registered User Senior Member
    2.2 is not acceptable. You might want to consider going for a 2nd degree to bring it up to 3.0 or higher in order to get into any masters programs. Was your major in psych? If so, consider a related field like neuroscience or sociology or something like that.

    Also, what would you want to do with a graduate degree in psychology? You can still work in clinics as aissistants to beef up your work experience.
  • MomwaitingfornewMomwaitingfornew Posts: 5,821Super Moderator Senior Member
    Why would you want to go back to school after having struggled? Graduate school is much more intense than undergraduate.

    I suggest that you try to work for a bit (I know -- the job market is tough). Then take some courses at a respected university/college that are specific to the field you want to study so you can get your GPA up. If you don't get As and high Bs in those courses, then you'll have to accept that advanced study in that field isn't going to happen. You also might want to do some soul searching about why you had a 2.2. Was it because you partied too hard? Or was your major wrong? Did you not yet have the correct critical thinking skills? Did you simply hate studying or going to class? Once you have your answers, I think you can begin to formulate a plan.

    If you haven't taken upper level courses in psychology, then you probably don't have a solid idea of the field. Intro courses give only give you a taste. My D had no less than four friends who arrived at college wanting to major in psych. After the intro class, two decided it wasn't for them. The other two changed their plans after taking one or two more specific courses. My D, who considered it herself, discovered after taking upper level courses that she didn't like the "soft science" of much of psych and instead landed in the related, part-psychology neuroscience department where biology and chemistry play larger roles. You really have to get deep into a field and do well in it before you can determine whether it's for you.
  • Mr.ZooMr.Zoo Posts: 248Registered User Junior Member
    "GPA minimum requirement" is designed for people exactly like you----do not have any plans for life and dream of something you do not deserve

    Sorry for being mean, but you need to suffer the consequence of your own behavior

    to asian: I went to Ohio State, which is a state school in midwest, no way in hell he can get in :D
  • asian75asian75 Posts: 448Registered User Member
    Oh I didn't know that Ohio State has a minimum GPA requirement
  • Mr.ZooMr.Zoo Posts: 248Registered User Junior Member
    asian boi that's pretty mean man, dont look down on midwest schools!

    here is some real data, from: http://www.psy.ohio-state.edu/graduate/
    In considering your application for admission, we will pay close attention to the following:

    * Your undergraduate transcript, including grade point average and courses, and the quality of the undergraduate training you received. You must supply complete transcripts of all previous academic training, including the first semester or quarter of the senior year, if possible. We normally require at least a 3.2 average for admission, but an average higher than 3.2 will not guarantee admission.

    usually on admission office they will not set a hard in stone "minimum GPA requirement", reason is so they can recruit certain "special" person they want without breaking the rules, but the above guideline is clear enough on the GPA requirement, so unless your dad is George Bush, you will get filtered out the first round
  • sarbruissarbruis Posts: 290Registered User Junior Member
    You're probably going to need a second degree with a significantly higher GPA. Or maybe (maybe) two or so years of courses with a very high GPA. Also, research experience.
  • gunitogunito Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    1) I know 2.2 isnt enough to get in.
    2) I didnt struggle with anything. I had different priorities which put school on the back burner.

    I majored in psych and im interested in behavioral neuroscience and neuropsych. I understand what im asking and saying might be near impossible, but theres no reason to to act high and mighty. Im just asking to see if theres any possibility, and i pretty much already know the answer.

    I just want to know if a 2nd bachelors would help get to grad school (phd).
  • MomwaitingfornewMomwaitingfornew Posts: 5,821Super Moderator Senior Member
    I don't think you need a second bachelor's as much as you need to do the coursework. Enroll as a non-matriculated student at a respected university, and try from there.
  • gunitogunito Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    Would a second bachelors make a difference? Would taking a couple grad level classes plus a year or two or research and a high gre score give me a good shot? How many classes do i need to take?
  • roxannecellbioroxannecellbio Posts: 106Registered User Junior Member
    Judging from my own experience (I had a below-3.0 GPA from my first degree, raised it up to above a 3.0 and was successful in applying to grad school)...

    You have to be super patient in getting your grades up. I'd say take two years of classes in your field of interest (upper-level classes if you can), or enough classes to raise your total GPA to at least a 3.0 (whichever comes first, which will probably be the two years). Prove that you can do really well in those courses (get straight A's).

    Also, during this time develop close academic relationships with your course professors so you can get an excellent letter of recommendation. And at the same time, get into a research lab during those two years, and get a shining letter of recommendation from that professor as well. Do a summer research program as well, if you can, so you can get a second letter of recommendation from another professor who knows your research.

    So, it'll probably take you another 2-3 years until you can even consider graduate school. That's how I had to do it. (In my case, I did get a second bachelor's, but that's because my first degree was in Liberal Arts. I think in your case it's not necessary if your first degree is related to your field of interest).
  • supernintendosupernintendo Posts: 2Registered User New Member
    It doesn't look too good. Correct me if I'm wrong, but if you did 4 years with a gpa of 2.2, you'd need another 4 years with a 4.0 just to raise your average to 3.1, which is about what you'd need to get in.
  • roxannecellbioroxannecellbio Posts: 106Registered User Junior Member
    Yeah, that's a good point supernintendo. It probably would take about as many units as the OP has already taken to raise the 2.2 GPA to above a 3.0. But wouldn't it be conceivable that if the OP earns a 4.0 in challenging upper-level classes for 2 years, that would demonstrate a commitment to and aptitude for the field?
  • bluealien01bluealien01 Posts: 1,941Registered User Senior Member
    What do you do all day to get a 2.2 GPA? I have never quite understood what people do to get GPA's that low. It isn't that hard to show up for class, do the work on time, and ask the professors or a tutorial center for help if you aren't understanding something.
  • safetypin00safetypin00 Posts: 351Registered User Member
    @ bluealien01. you don't know the circumstances that people live in when they are in undergrad. one awful year can screw you over. not all students live in the ideal world where they can go to class and study without life interfering in the way, sometimes majorly. sick parent(s) and having many siblings to take care of is just one of the most ordinary ones that pops to mind. combined with not originally planning to go on to grad school it means they might not have decided early enough to take a year or two off during undergrad. sometimes it IS that hard to show up for class and do work on time. just combining the numbers of people that struggle with addiction and mental health issues (those 1-2% add up) alone means someone in your family or you even, can struggle and that impacts EVERYONE surrounding them, and sometimes MAJORLY.
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